Which direction to rig whole macks

Discussion in 'Tackle and Rigging' started by hamptonsurf, Aug 20, 2009.

  1. hamptonsurf

    hamptonsurf Senior Member

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    I have more experience rigging dead baits for marlin etc., and alwys rig them with the hook point facing the tail. I do this because Marlin with move a bait around in their mouth i order to swallow it head first. Do Tuna do this? or do they just swallow it like a freight train the way they do everything else?
     
  2. red34

    red34 Guest

    Seems like you'd usually be drifting or bump trolling where you'd want to bridle hook it to the nose or eyes to keep the bait swimming with the boat and making it easier on the bait to stay alive longer.
     

  3. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    I have more experience rigging dead baits for marlin etc., and alwys rig them with the hook point facing the tail. I do this because Marlin with move a bait around in their mouth i order to swallow it head first. Do Tuna do this? or do they just swallow it like a freight train the way they do everything else?

    Live or dead?
    I rig them through the nose live,and with the point facing foreward dead.
     
  4. hamptonsurf

    hamptonsurf Senior Member

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    Interesting....I bridle them for live trolling (which leaves the point facing forward), but have always faced the point to the tail when drifting dead bait. Perhaps it makes no difference with these fish. Thanks Guys
     
  5. SpecialK

    SpecialK Super Moderator

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    I have always rigged them in the head hook facing forward. If drifting I will stash a small split shot in the belly to keep them belly down. I have never seen it done another way.
     
  6. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    tuna inhale baits - they don't chew or flip the bait around or anything. this is why it makes no sense to let the fish "run" with the bait after they take it. the longer you wait the more likely it is to be spit out.
     
  7. hamptonsurf

    hamptonsurf Senior Member

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    big distinction from marlin etc.
     
  8. nxtbgctch

    nxtbgctch Senior Member

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    Ive seen a number of big yellowfin caught with large marlin livebait. Seems they usually have the tail of the hardtail sticking out of their mouth when they come in. These were bridled 12-14" hardtails and the fish was allowed to run with it.
     
  9. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    Ive seen a number of big yellowfin caught with large marlin livebait. Seems they usually have the tail of the hardtail sticking out of their mouth when they come in. These were bridled 12-14" hardtails and the fish was allowed to run with it.

    if you're marlin fishing and you're unsure whether its a marlin or not then you're going to let them run. just watch videos of tuna underwater eating. they just engulf the fish.

    but i agree with bridling in general. keeps the bait alive and swimming the best.
     
  10. red34

    red34 Guest

    Bret,

    You wouldn't come tight immediately on a chunk or dead bait would you? When we're chunking blackfins with shrimp boat chum I generally have to let them run for a bit or the circle hook doesn't usually hang correctly.

    I found similar results with live sardines and anchovies in So Cal
     
  11. SpecialK

    SpecialK Super Moderator

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    Bret,

    You wouldn't come tight immediately on a chunk or dead bait would you? When we're chunking blackfins with shrimp boat chum I generally have to let them run for a bit or the circle hook doesn't usually hang correctly.

    I found similar results with live sardines and anchovies in So Cal
    I'll let them run for about 1.5 sec and just push the drag lever. Like Bret said, the tuna just inhale the bait.
     
  12. red34

    red34 Guest

    Maybe it's just with the free floating chunks then...or maybe I just suck at fishing ;)

    With the liveys, I missed 2 fish by the hook pulling when I would come tight. I was fishing live bait hooks rather than circles on the crew's recommendation. I would have felt more comfortable with circles, but I figured they knew what they were talking about. The yf I did catch was after a pretty long dropback and was still hooked in the corner of the mouth. The 2 I lost were probably Albacore too, which i have still never caught!!
     
  13. hamptonsurf

    hamptonsurf Senior Member

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    With a circle hook.....technicaly....they should be able to damn near swallow the whole thing and still have it work out of the gut to the corner of the mouth. Letting them run with a circle is NECESSARY....but completely different that a traditonal/non-circle hook. With circle, they start running and you just east the drag forward, that's the best way to have it slide out to the corner of the mouth, turn the corner and grab hold at the point.....then the hook works like any other hook once it has been set.