What gear will you use for 200lb tuna?

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by Minnow, Feb 13, 2009.

I f you get a change to catch you 200lb tuna, what kind of gear would you use?

  1. I would like to catch 200lb tuna on stand up /conventional gear.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. I would like to catch 200lb tuna on jigging gear, spinner or conventional.

    8 vote(s)
    17.4%
  3. I would like to catch 200lb tuna on spinner popping gear.

    10 vote(s)
    21.7%
  4. I would like to catch 200lb tuna on chair.

    28 vote(s)
    60.9%
  1. Minnow

    Minnow Administrator

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    If you get a change to catch you 200lb tuna, what kind of gear would you use?

    Spinner on popper for me.
     
  2. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    it doesn't matter, as long as i catch one

    BUT if i had to pick.......i guess jigging with a conventional first...then popping :)

    TJ im about to leave for the airport, i'll call you in a minute
     

  3. Bellyups

    Bellyups Senior Member

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    TJ, you know my answer:)! Spinner on a popper.
     
  4. Sea Crappie

    Sea Crappie Senior Member

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    popping gear, no doubt
     
  5. papio

    papio Senior Member

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    TJ, deep jigging with spinner hooked up to 200lb Large Eye. Man to animal, pound for pound, power cranking, cramped/locked/burining muscles - singing drag. Nuting beta than that, hehehe.
     
  6. pametfisher

    pametfisher Senior Member

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    I've had to make these decisions this winter and I just posted on another site so here are my thoughts:

    It's hard to know for sure what size fish we're going to see in CCB and on Stellwagen but I'd like to be prepared for fish in the 150 to 200 lb. range. Personally I like throwing poppers, etc. to the surface fish and jigging so I'm planning to upgrade reels, line and rod. Here's what I'm thinking:

    Line: Last year I bought a new reel that was supposed to have been loaded with 50# braid. After the season was over, tests showed that it was 30# line with an actual breaking strength of 40#. My plan is to upgrade to 60# braid if I can use all spliced connections and wind-on style leaders (still deciding) or to go 80# if I decide to tie knots. Wind-on leaders will be either loop-to-loop or spliced in.

    Reel: My Penn 950 SSMs are good to about 16-18 lbs. drag. I would like to get to 20-25#. I have purchased Stella 20K FA (older model) off eBay, to cut the cost of new 20K SW which is in the stratosphere. I thought about other spinning reels but top mounted drag washers (Spheros, Saragosa type) concentrate the heat in too small an area, IMO. 950 SSM and Stella are both bottom of spool drags. For me, the sustainability of drag level is important.

    Rod: I have St. Croix SWS70MHF. I'm trying to find a rod with enough backbone to throw heavy plugs & jigs, and with enough backbone to withstand 25-30 lbs. of drag, but also one that bends enough so that it isn't too long when pulling fish from below the boat. I'd like a lot more leverage during the lifting phase. I'd appreciate any recommendations. (??)

    Belt: Haven't decided yet but want one that will position my rod butt relatively low for leverage.
     
  7. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    Stand up fishing with a spinner. I don't care if it's a jig, popper, or a live bait. I just want the change to do it. I've tried it twice, but no big tuna around. Next trip is a very decent chance. I'm buying some new toy's to help out with my quest. It won't be a task for the timid.

    I'm figuring using at least 30#'s of constant fighting drag to have a shot without wearing out in a long battle. I don't want to hand off to another person because of a long arm burning battle. I went to bed last night with this subject in my mind. I now think I have a plan. I just need some more equipment and some luck with big tuna hitting my presentation.
     
  8. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    I'm trying to find a rod with enough backbone to throw heavy plugs & jigs, and with enough backbone to withstand 25-30 lbs. of drag, but also one that bends enough so that it isn't too long when pulling fish from below the boat. I'd like a lot more leverage during the lifting phase. I'd appreciate any recommendations. (??)


    Wont be too long(hopefully this summer) till theres a popping rod capable of 40lbs of drag:eek:


    d-a
     
  9. bigscrnman

    bigscrnman Senior Member

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    I would have to say spinning with poppers! My biggest to date on popper is 90# and that had me high as a kite for days!!!!
     
  10. gman

    gman Senior Member

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    if you use the rod correctly you can use heavier drag than stated by companies. Most mistakes are made because people high stick and break rods. Ive used rods way past their capabilities just need to know when to push limits and when to wait
     
  11. Bellyups

    Bellyups Senior Member

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    if you use the rod correctly you can use heavier drag than stated by companies. Most mistakes are made because people high stick and break rods. Ive used rods way past their capabilities just need to know when to push limits and when to wait

    I have learned not to bend a rod more than 90 degrees. After 90, IMO, you are simply further bending the weak part of the rod. If you don't let it bend more than 90 degrees, the rod is forced to continually bend further down the blank. This is just my opinon, but this is the basis for my desire for tuna blanks with slower action and tons of backbone, so when they are deep, you can really pull hard, as long as the rod does't bend more than 90 degrees at any one spot.
     
  12. Ricky-Ray

    Ricky-Ray Member

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    Conventional. Get that baby on the deck as soon as possible. As Bruce Smith, Captain of the Shogun once said. Once you hook onto a cow the clock starts ticking and the longer you have it in the water the greater the chances of you losing it, whether it be caused by you, fish, other anglers or whatever other reason.
     
  13. TBaker

    TBaker Senior Member

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    Conventional. Get that baby on the deck as soon as possible. As Bruce Smith, Captain of the Shogun once said. Once you hook onto a cow the clock starts ticking and the longer you have it in the water the greater the chances of you losing it, whether it be caused by you, fish, other anglers or whatever other reason.

    Not strictly true anymore. I grew up on the West Coast and if I still lived there, I'd probably say the same thing you are. But I've seen and used the new high-end spinning equipment and, trust me, in terms of strength and drag capacity, they'll handle those fish. So the argument that conventional is superior by definition doesn't wash anymore. There are 2 things that can give certain conventionals an advantage. 1) 2-speeds, and 2) lugs for the use of a harness. Note that not all conventionals have those advantages, btw.

    Now, the need for 2-speeds is debatable since many a huge fish has been caught on old single-speed reels. However, the use of a harness (or a chair) for fish that size strikes me as a virtual necessity regardless of your equipment (god bless anyone who doesn't need one for that fight! :eek: ). At this point, spinning rigs are more difficult to set up for the use of a harness, but not impossible. Riggged to handle a harness much like a conventional, the new spinning gear will bring one of those cows to the boat, no doubt. :)
     
  14. pametfisher

    pametfisher Senior Member

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    if you use the rod correctly you can use heavier drag than stated by companies. Most mistakes are made because people high stick and break rods. Ive used rods way past their capabilities just need to know when to push limits and when to wait

    I have learned not to bend a rod more than 90 degrees. After 90, IMO, you are simply further bending the weak part of the rod. If you don't let it bend more than 90 degrees, the rod is forced to continually bend further down the blank. This is just my opinon, but this is the basis for my desire for tuna blanks with slower action and tons of backbone, so when they are deep, you can really pull hard, as long as the rod does't bend more than 90 degrees at any one spot.

    I came to the same conclusion a couple of months ago and contacted a couple of major US rod makers who would have nothing to do with the idea. I'm delighted to hear you both say the same thing and I hope that one day the rod makers will catch on. (Overseas and specialized rod manufacturers seem to give a lot more information.)

    Going further with your 90 degree observations, at 0 degrees, a rod can take any drag that the reel seat will support, therefore rod manufacturers could give a really intelligent spec from 0 degrees to say 135 degrees and we would all know a lot about the gear.

    I too want a slower action blank with a lot of backbone so that the leverage is in my favor during the lifting phase. For now, I'm just testing each rod, one at a time, till I find the one that suits me.

    Now to rant a little more, one day line manufacturers will give us the typical breaking strength of the line rather than an often grossly de-rated number that makes knots seem stronger than they actually are ...
     
  15. kidflex

    kidflex Senior Member

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    spinner. popping preferably but jigging would be fine too.
     
  16. red34

    red34 Guest

    I just want to catch a really big fish on one of the new rods I've built.
     
  17. jig

    jig Senior Member

    1,325
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    I just need some more equipment

    LMAO
     
  18. ember

    ember Guest

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    • 200 on stand up-conventional, with a good harness and technique,its no big deal. You need to be in at least the 3's before it starts to become an even match
    • Jigging with spinning or conventional, I'm in,either way
    • Spinning popper-There it is,that huge boil on your plug is what its all about.If he misses 2 or 3 times before he gets it,so much the better.
    • Using a chair well on huge fish is an art that takes more than a few opportunities to get good at, but a 200lb fish would pretty much just be an excercise in reeling in.
     
  19. Bill Fisher

    Bill Fisher Senior Member

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    If you get a change to catch you 200lb tuna, what gear would you use?



    high gear!........

    i don't waste alotta time gettin'em in so i can move on to the next 200#er

    the 'bite' ain't gonna last forever ya know ;)
     
  20. Fish'nFool

    Fish'nFool Member

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    Jigging with a spinning rod on lighter tackle.

    I appreciate the fight and the sporting aspect to it as much as I appreciate the taste of tuna, so I am in no hurry to hustle the fish to the boat. I relish the burn and the sound of the drag - man against fish. If I lose a fish it will be back to fight another day and although my box might be empty, win-or-lose I still walk away gratified over the ensuing battle. FISH ON!