Twinspin

Discussion in 'Reels' started by Uncle Russ, Apr 23, 2008.

  1. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Last evening, I received my new Accurate Twinspin SR20 and SR12 (from Charkbait), each with a spare spool. I had the 20 spools filled to the brim with JB 80 and 65 solid, and the 12 spools, also to the brim, with JB 65 and 50 solid. I had not had a chance to see the 20 before, but I had seen the "little" 12 in Houston and had already fallen in love with it. It is a little jewel that looks, feels, and so far acts, like a tank. I may well end up using this reel more than any other non-bay reel I own.

    Both reels came with very large, attractive black nylon bags with cords and cord locks--something none of my other Accurates have had. They seem to provide the same bag, regardless of reel size.

    They both have a 5-1 gear ratio. The SR20 has the same sized "holy" knob as the SR30, but a shorter lever (for lack of a better word.) The 12 has a much smaller, more oval knob for it's handle. The threads (for attaching the handle to the reel body) on the 30 and 20 appear to be identical, but the 20 handle bottoms out if you try to attach it to the 30 and will not work. I have not tried it the other way around, but intend to do so. A longer handle on the 20 might be nice from a leverage standpoint, but I doubt it will work.

    Both reels sound and feel considerably smoother than their big brother, the SR30 with 6-1 ratio, but not, of course, as smooth as the Stella 20K or 8K.

    So far I have not had much time to try either. My only drill last night was to put the SR12 on the OTI 7 foot popping rod, tie a 7-turn surgeons loop in the 65 pound braid, and attach that to the hook of a Chatillon 100 pound scale. I cranked the drag up to 15, then 20, then 25, and the reel released line very smoothly and with no catching. I jerked fairly hard at all 3 settings (using a straight pull so as not to harm the rod) and there was no problem with smoothness.

    I should mention that the OTI rod takes drag at least 25 percent above its rating of 20 pounds, but I won't fish it that way. I intend to fish this reel on both the OTI 7-footer and the Smith KGS-70MH and there is no doubt in my mind that either would be fine for small to medium yellowfin. T.J. tells me the OTI rod will definitely land one but will just take a little longer--I'm not so sure it would take longer, given the fact that I probably would not go much above 20 pounds of drag on a popping rig myself.

    The only glitch I noticed is that the SR20 has an ever-so-slight roughness while cranking with no load, as the spool moves closer to the butt end of the rod. I tried this with both spools and could feel it in both cases, although less with one spool than the other. I intend to play with it some before crying foul.

    Tonight I am going check for maximum lock-down drag with a straight pull on both reels and put the 20 on the OTI 600 gram jig rod.

    I fell in love with spinning gear the first time I saw a Mitchell 300 back in the '50s. I hated what passed for bait casting reels in those days,--my first rig being a solid steel casting rod about 5 feet long with a Ronson reel--and I don't much like any of them today either. So I saved for months to buy a Mitchell for $9.95 at the old Texas Liquor Store in San Antonio (They also sold sporting goods--If you were old enough (which I was not until later) you could drive up on Saturday night, walk in and buy a case of Henry McKenna, a rifle, a couple of pistols, and a several hundred rounds of ammo, then pick up a couple of your girl friends, and drive around all night running over metal garbage cans, swilling whiskey, and firing odd shots in the air--and no one in San Antonio would even notice very much.) I never dreamed in those misty days of yesteryear that I would live to see the fruition of a spin-fisherman's dream--the Stellas and the Twinspins. I figure if I'm lucky, I've got about 20-25 years to enjoy them and I have no doubt they will last that long. So be nice to old Uncle Russ and I may name some of you in the will! But not you, gimmedeal or Drifter--not you!

    Russ
     
  2. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    Uncle Russ,

    You made a good choice with both the SR12 and SR20. I've been bottom feeding for a SR20 for over 4 months without any success. At least with charkbait, you get 10% off and free shipping with your Captain's card. I have a couple of the SR30's. One high gear ratio, one low gear ratio.

    They are by far the heaviest duty spinner on the market. Compare the frame and other parts with the Stella 20K and I would guess it is at least 33% stronger. The twin spins are a little heavier, but so what. You're not fishing for piggy perch with the reels.

    Yes, the Stella is a little smoother, but those twin spins aren't bad. Give it some hours of cranking and it will get smoother. I have a friend that has been using a few SR30's for a couple of years. They get smoother with time as the gears are so hard and machined with tight tolerances.

    Once I buy a SR20 I will play with the handles. For sure, the knob will be replaced. That's a fact. I hate that little golf size whiffle ball. I gather that from what you stated above, that the length of the SR20 handle is shorter than the SR30. There's probably a reason for that length difference. They probably figure people fishing with a SR20 want a faster line retrieve than the 30. Call Accurate and find out it the SR30 and SR20 handles are interchangeable.

    As far as Texas Liquor Stores. I grew up about one mile from the one on Broadway in Alamo Heights in San Antonio. My father took me inside that store at least a few hundred times. We hit it before each hunting or fishing trip. He would always buy his booze, ammo, guns and fishing gear before we hit the road. They even gave you a free cup with ice as you left. My father always wanted his "Roadie" cup so he mix a stiff one for the drive. Mother's Against Drunk Driver would freak out now if someone gave you a roadie cup.

    I continued the tradition until they closed the stores. In fact, when they were having a clearance, I bought over 300 of the "Pico" lures they had in inventory. "Pico" lures were hand made in San Antonio for over 40 years. I still have all the Pico's in their original boxes. The ones I got from Texas Liquor Stores for a buck and a half on clearance are now worth over 20 bucks apiece as Pico was bought out by Hebbon. Hebbon wanted to get rid of Pico because they were fish catching machines. The whole line was discontinued.
     

  3. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Wow, MrBill, that brings back memories--after I got the Mitchell, I mainly used it in stock tanks down on the family's place in Lavaca County. I used three lures and three lures only--the Tiny Lucky 13 for a floater, a Pico Chico for a crank bait (imitated those pond perch perfectly) and the old Abu Reflex. Then I bought the entire line of Mitchell's. I had them stored in a garage during the summer of '73 when I was on an internship in D.C. and let a filthy hippie (this guy looked like the dudes in the Cave man adds for Geico, but without the suits) who had lived in a cave out on Balcones escarpment, stay in my garage for the summer. The SOB sold all my rods and reels to buy dope and scandalized my neighbors by sitting out in the back yard with his hair down to his waist and nothing but a clear plastic loin cloth on, smoking weed and pure hashish out of a bamboo bong and and making sandals out of old tires to sell on the Drag. When I threatened to kick the shit out of him and call the cops he told me I was on a "White Power Trip", even though he whiter than I was. He also showed me a naked bas relief carving he had made of himself, covered with body hair and hung like a Clydesdale nailed on a cross--and told me he had planned to give it to my wife--but now he was keeping it. Ah old Austin--you couldn't live with it and you couldn't live without it. I haven't owned a Mitchell since--I may look for one on the internet. The scumbag hippie is probably working in high tech now and living in a Mcmansion.

    If anyone ever runs into an old Abu catalog with an article called "My Mitchell and Me," let me know what you want for it. I am definitely a nostalgia freak.

    But back to the Twenty-First Century: Which SR30 ratio do you prefer for jigging and for popping, respectively? As for handles, T.J. is going to help me put an ATD 50 type handle on the SR30 once we are on the Big E in July.

    Russ
     
  4. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    But back to the Twenty-First Century: Which SR30 ratio do you prefer for jigging and for popping, respectively? As for handles, T.J. is going to help me put an ATD 50 type handle on the SR30 once we are on the Big E in July.

    Russ

    Make sure you use locktite when replacing the handle. Replace it at the dock or soon after, as locktite takes about 12 hours to cure. You could use it right away, but better safe to do it in advance.

    The gear ratio depends on how you fish. If you are a power fisherman (one that likes to winch instead of using the rod) then the SR30L with the 4:1 ratio is best. If you use the spinner for trolling, I'd go with the SR30 6:1 ratio. That 6:1 ratio really comes in handy if you have a Hoo retreat and come back to-wards the boat. They're famous for it.

    As far as jigging and popping each ratio has it's advantages. Pencil poppers seem to work best if a constant motion is presented. Fast cranking with a horizontal left to right rod action without pauses gets most hits. The 6:1 is great for swimbaits as a faster retrieve is more productive. It's also good for ripping a 300 gm or less jig straight up for fast swimming fish like hoo's and blackfins.

    As for tossing popper's either gear ratio works fine. After you pop the lure, the normal two to three second pause before the next pop will give you plenty of time to take up the slack. You would also want the 4:1 ratio if you were jigging heavy jigs in deep water. You can last a lot longer with that low gear.

    After a hookup, the 4:1 sure is nice. It's 50% easier to crank. If you use the rod properly with short quick pumps, the 6:1 isn't all that bad. The best of both worlds (two speeds) would be perfect. One of these days, someone will develop a two speed spinner. I'm sure all manufactures have made attempts without success. It will happen, but both you and me will be lying horizontal under six feet of dirt before it's on the market:eek: .
     
  5. Gunsmoke

    Gunsmoke Guest

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    WOW,

    That Texas Liquor Store was the best.:) I really miss it. :mad: It was like a candy store for adults. All the liquor was on one half and the sporting goods on the half. They had great prices on guns and liquor. When I walked in they would welcome you from across the store by your name. I sometimes felt like Norm on Cheers on my entrance. :D

    I always told the manager that if he could build an upstairs and turn it into whore house it would be the "Complete Store".:) :) :) :) :) :) :)
    Guns, Tackle, liquor, ammo and women in one location. :D :D :D

    They carried S&W and Colt pistols along with Weatherby rifles and other every day brands. They would also mount your scope and bore sight it while you grabbed your liquor. I had an open charge account with no limit. My statements were huge from Dove Season till the end of Deer Season. It was always the first bill I paid. I loved that place.:rolleyes:

    Russ, put those twinspins to work. The more you use them, the better you will like them. If you drop a Stella from the flying bridge the spool will dent so bad you can't crank it. A twinspin on the other hand can withstand the blow and keep trucking. Think of those two brands as "Gas or Diesel". One is quiet and doesn't vibrate but needs a tune up or body shop now and then. The other one makes a little noise, but it just keeps going and going and going.
     
  6. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    All good info, MrBill, and thanks very much.

    Gunsmoke: that is good to hear from someone who has used them in actual combat a lot more than I have. In 1959, I bought my first deer rifle at TLS on San Pedro and Hildebrand. Pre-64 (well, duh) and cost me $49.95. Then I had them mount a Weaver K-4 on a side mount--only thing I ever killed with it was a squirrel that pissed me off over corn I had tossed out by hand--not many feeders in those days, and I damned sure didn't have one.

    Tonight, I did a little more testing, this time of all three Twin Spins, with the following results. All rods were held at a 45 degree angle and all loops were 7-turn surgeon's loops:

    1. Twinspin SR12 mounted on the OTI 7 foot popping rod, rated for 20 pounds max drag. Line was 65 pound JB solid. Drag locked down at 25 pounds give or take 2 pounds.

    1. Twinspin SR12 mounted on the OTI 7 foot popping rod, rated for 20 pounds max drag. Line was 65 pound JB solid. Drag locked down at 25 pounds give or take 2 pounds.

    1. Twinspin SR12 mounted on the OTI 7 foot popping rod, rated for 20 pounds max drag. Line was 65 pound JB solid. Drag locked down at 25 pounds give or take 2 pounds.

    2. Twinspin SR20 mounted on a Smith Nirai jigging rod, rated for 29 pounds max drag. Line was 80 pound JB solid. Drag locked down at 30 pounds give or take 2 pounds.

    3. Twinspin SR30 mounted on a 7 foot Accurate Calstar with no specific max drag and a reputation of being able to give a real man a hernia before breaking. Line was 130 pound JB hollow. Drag locked down at 45 pounds, almost on the money. I damned near died, pulling on it.

    So the 12 and the 20 are reasonably close in drag capability with the 30 way out in front, beating the 20 by 50 percent. All of the reels gave line out very smoothly at locked down drag--although I did not really try to warm the drag up prior to the tests as you are supposed to do.

    I would fish these rigs, respectively, at 20, 25, and 30 pounds max drag, and, subject to what others may say, I think it would be fun to fish the entire 76 hour trip with only spinners. I feel that the SR30 could be used to pull big AJ s out from a rig--but I'm just not the man to do it any more. If I got one on, with 45 pounds of drag, my fighting strategy would be to hand the rod to either Gunsmoke, MrBill, or gimmedeal and say--"Dude, you ain't shit if you can't land this fish." Then I would have my own tag ready. :)



    Russ
     
  7. ichibahn

    ichibahn ** Pak Lurah **

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    Uncle Russ,
    How much you pay for SR12 spare spool ?

    Freddy.
     
  8. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Freddy: The spare for the SR12 was $155.00 and that for the SR20 was $170.00. As I recall, the one for the SR30 is about $195.

    One feature I didn't mention (which I really like) that I'm sure everyone familiar with the reels knows about, is the fact that the drag setting is contained entirely within the spool. This means that you set the drag with the outer, graduated knob on the front of the spool, and that drag setting remains no matter how many times you detach or attach the spool using the inner, gnurled, nut. Thus, you can set the drag on your 65 pound spool to, say, 20 pounds, and that on your 50 pound spool, to 15 pounds and never have to worry when you change spools. I have tested this feature many times on the SR30 and it is golden.

    The other side of that coin is that you can also record the incrmental drag for each graduated mark on the drag knob, and, at least theoretically, change it while fighting a fish. On the other hand, it is not a series of clicks, so, in practice, it would be very difficult to do accurately and you would pretty much have to do it by feel. I tested this some time ago on the SR30 but cannot remember how much drag is indicated by each mark. And I don't think it is completely linear.

    Russ
     
  9. ballywhoo

    ballywhoo Guest

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    Uncle,

    Please to make sure you make out your will to Carlos and Lugo. Also we will be posting feedback on your equipment. We will be testing it offshore for ya.
     
  10. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    For all of you who have not met ballywhoo, let me formally introduce him to the Board: He is a native New Yorker, but in spite of that, every once in a while he comes up with a worthwhile opinion or a correct observation--just not often. He does happen to be the world's greatest fisherman--If you don't believe me, just ask him. ballywhoo and Drifter, and another guy named Steve (who has the good sense not to post too often) all work together. The first time I ever met ballywhoo, I was pissed off at him to start with because he had not shown up for one of my meetings. But after talking to him for about half an hour, I was glad he hadn't shown up! :) He was sitting in his office with a humongous unlimited Chair Rod that could have served as a tower crane and a humongous single-speed reel, and he was bragging about getting a good deal on the setup, so I knew right away somebody had seen him coming.

    Ballywhoo is a government employee. He bought a new dog and named it "Coffee Break".

    He's also one of the funniest guys you will ever meet. Only, don't laugh at him--he doesn't realize he's being funny. I have no doubt he will make some pathetic response to this post--but no matter--having a battle of wits with ballywhoo is like having a gunfight with an unarmed man.

    He takes his advice on buying tackle from Drifter, so you can bet he will end up with a bunch of broken gear.

    Anyway, the boy has the offshore bug bad. He can give you some excellent tips on how to tell your wife you are going fishing--just watch everthing he does and then---don't do it. The bottom line is that I'm about as likely to let him and Louis "test" my gear as Minister Wright is to be elected Vice President.

    Russ