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I tried something like that on a YFT a few years ago, and the skin sure as hell didn't peel off like that. Might try it again on blackfins. Sure looked easy.
 

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Normally the colder a tuna is, the easier the skin comes off. With most fish, if you leave them iced really well overnight, they dress easier and yield more.

Jim, you nailed it. THE COLDER THE BETTER!

IF YOU LEAVE THEM OVERNIGHT MAKE SURE THE BELLY/STOMACH DIDNT GET GAFFED IF THIS HAPPENS THE ACID FROM THE STOMACH WILL RUIN THE MEAT
 

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It's an Oregon guy that made that vid. That's the typical tuna that we get and pretty much the typical way we cark them. There's a group of fishers that go by the name Salty Dogs that's been a great mentor for many in the Northwest. NW Albacore fishing has been catching on like a wildfire and the Salty Dogs have been sharing the techniques on how to locate, catch and care for the tuna. The second the fish hits the deck it's brain spiked, cut and put in a bleed bucket then gilled/gutted, ice slurried then packed in ice with rock salt. The skin does pull right off and the meat is sushi quality.

Wish we had some BFT and YFT up here too.
 

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Thank you for awesome videos,I bet everybody learn alot
like me.Guy at fish market cuts the head so fast,I had the watch 3 times.Great information,thanks again
 

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I have found that Albacore skin is thicker and tougher, easier to remove. Then comes Yellowfin... then Bluefin... Skinning skipjack is a PITA, paper thin. I have seen people try that with Bluefin.... it is not nearly that easy. I have never tried it with Albacore becuase the skin comes off fairly easily with a knife. I don't think it would work like that for any other type of tuna.

With Bluefin, I loin them in quarters. Then I do not skin the whole loin even though that is prettier. I lay the quartered fish down on the skin. I run a fillet knfe between the skin and the meat until I go in about a one gallon zip lock size slice of meat....Slice that off. Then I repeat. Eventually all the skin is off and you know where the fillets are stored for transport.

Mike
 

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I've done it that way on BFT. It's pretty easy too do. Just start the skin and grab a pair of channel locks and pull. Do that a lot with stripper's too.
 

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I've done it that way on BFT. It's pretty easy too do. Just start the skin and grab a pair of channel locks and pull. Do that a lot with stryper's too.

I have seen it done. In my opinion, requiring channel locks makes it too complicated. (BTW, we used pliers) We had also ripped through the skin a couple times requiring two or three "pulls" per loin. At that point I said that a knife was just as easy.

Maybe I was pulling incorrectly.... ?

Never thought of it for Stripers.... hhmm?? Got me thinking. Thick scaly skin. I like the idea!!!!

Mike
 

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I do tuna differently! We bleed them and ice them down and when it's time to clean them, I get that job usually.

First thing is to remove the head and guts. I have a Japanese Deba knife for this :) I slice around the top of the head, just behind the skull (save as much meat as possible!) all the way down to the spine. I slit the throat so the entrails are exposed, but still in 1 piece. The Deba comes out and I twist and use the Deba on the spine between the bones to take the head off. Pull the head off and most of the entrails will usually follow. Then I clean out the body cavity and I am left with a headless and gutless tuna. The stomach lining protects the meat from that end; the only exposed flesh is around where I took the head off. I leave the tail on as a handle.

I differ a little depending on the size of the tuna. Smaller tuna, I will actually fillet like a regular fish, going right thru the horizontal bones with my deba and I get 2 fillets. I think break them down into the usual quarters by cutting along the horizontal bones, which are now exposed and visible.

With the larger Tuna, I lay the tuna on its side and starting at the tail (easier to find the bone structure with the smaller bones that are normally horizontal), run the Deba on the near side of the horizontal bones down to the vertical bones and use my fingers and a flexible fillet knife to get between the vertical bones and the flesh. I kinda roll the quarter right off of the vertical bones and use the knife to trim and cut as I go until the loin is removed. Repeat the same for the other 3 sides and I have 4 nice loins and very little wasted meat and it goes pretty quickly! The guys were amazed at how clean the racks where when I was done!

Found this on youtube tonight, very similar to how I do the smaller tuna with taking the head off, then filleting into 2 pieces, then breaking down into loins. I leave the skin and fins on and deal with them later in the process. I go from the tail to the head when filleting to make sure I am on the bones.
YouTube - How to Filet a Fish (Tuna for Sashimi)
 
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