Tsunami Swim Shad with assist hook for bluefin ?

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by ksong, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Here is Willie's 07-08 report with Capt Dom.
    They didn't show any respect for bluefin as they only threw lures like sluggo or Tsunami Swim Shad cheaper than one piece of bluefin sushi :)
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    What an exciting day out there with Capt. Dom, Mike (FishWisher), and Capt. Josh and Ross from the Yankee Fleet in Gloucester. We had been a bit on the fence about the weather on Tuesday afternoon, but decided to just go for it and deal with the conditions presented to us. If we caught a fish, awesome—and if we didn’t, at least we’d know we gave it a shot. I’d say it worked out for the best! The morning greeted us with only light winds, overcast skies, and good visibility, and although the wind would eventually pick up the rain never did find us. Mike was happy about that!

    We left the dock at 4:30 AM and an hour-long steam put us right in the zone in Cape Cod Bay (it was too snotty outside to make a go of it). Things started off right—we began smelling that adrenaline-inducing metallic tunoid odor in the air as soon as we throttled down, and had a triple-digit fish porpoise right in front of us even before getting a line wet! After seeing a few scattered fish, the real action began. Epic feeds began popping up, schools of dozens, even hundreds of fish of mixed sizes (everything from 30-200-pounders) crashing bait all over the surface! Dom put us right into the meat the first few times, but our excitement got the better of us and what ensued was an absolute circus—tangled lines, botched casts, and the like. Shame! We did manage to put a few casts right into the melee, but didn’t get any takers.

    These remarkable surface blitzes continued for quite some time; we’d go up on ‘em, put a variety of baits into ‘em (Slug-Gos, Sea Dogs, plastic swimmers, and soft-plastic swimbaits), but wouldn’t get any takers. I had a fish track my Slug-Go all the way to the boat, but I may have been retrieving it too fast and the fish didn’t take it. Didn’t think you could retrieve too fast for tuna but I guess when they’re not super-hot a slower twitching retrieve might do it. Ross also had a fish smack his Slug-Go as soon as it hit the water but he couldn’t get tight to it in time and it spit the bait. Eventually, Josh hooked a fish—also on a Slug-Go—cast into the blitz. But during the first run, something happened and the braid broke right above his Albright. We think that maybe another tuna’s tail had hit the line, or maybe a shearwater? Weird stuff. Anyway, after the first hour and a half, we’d had plenty of shots but no tuna in the boat. But at least most of the nervous energy was gone, and we actually were able to work and communicate with one another while casting to fish. An amazing thing, that teamwork stuff.

    We continued to execute the run-and-gun, coming up on fish—sometimes big pods, sometimes just singles and doubles—but had a tough time cajoling them into eating a bait. Eventually, however, Mike came through, hooking up on a rig that he’s been talking about for the last few years to anyone who would listen—a soft-plastic swimbait rigged with an assist hook! To be more specific, a 7-inch Tsunami swim shad with the stock hook cut off, the assist hook put on a solid ring, and the solid ring attached to the swimbait via a split ring. He lightly hooked the assist hook in the shad body to keep it from fouling. I’m sure he’ll be happy to provide some more details .

    As we expected, Mike proceeded to own that fish—12 minutes from hookup to deck, circles and all. Dom put the straight gaff in her and, animal that he is, hauled it over the rail unassisted. The fish taped out at about 60 inches and was an estimated 110 pounds.

    In the middle of cleaning up and getting ready for pictures, we saw more fish busting just off the bow, and went off to chase them. Once again, Josh, Ross and I put baits right into the madness, but came up empty. Smart fish! We never did see what the fish were feeding on, and the stomach of Mike’s fish was empty so I guess we’ll never know. Once things settled down, we got our pictures taken (a trying ordeal given Mike/Nancy’s reluctance to dirty his bright-white sneakers and fancy rain gear with tuna blood) and went back on the hunt.

    We continued to see scattered schools of fish, but after about 10:00 AM the surface action had for the most part tapered off. We came up on a couple of pods over the next few hours but once again had no takers. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the east-northeast at about 15 knots and it looked like it was going to become sporty in a hurry, so we elected to pack it in for the day.

    Thanks to Dom for bearing with us during the early-morning insanity—way to keep it together, Ahab. And thanks for turning a marginal weather day into a great success. Can’t wait to do it again! Josh, Rosco, and Michael: a pleasure as always.

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  2. gimmedeal

    gimmedeal Senior Member

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    'metallic tunoid odor' I like it a lot. Congratulations on the catch. You never know what lure's gonna be the one on a given day. Looking forward to Oct when I get my turn.

    Fred
     

  3. Enoch

    Enoch Senior Member

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    Awesome creativity for Capt Dom.
    There is some good stuff happening here... Now I really wish I can be up there throwing 7" storm shads with you guys!
     
  4. fishingeek

    fishingeek Senior Member

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    Nice work Guys!!! Frustrating to see that many fish and not getting them to eat:mad: but you stuck it out and went home with the prize:)
     
  5. ty2philly

    ty2philly Senior Member

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    Awesome creativity for Capt Dom.
    There is some good stuff happening here... Now I really wish I can be up there throwing 7" storm shads with you guys!

    Awesome report.

    Enoch,
    Now we know what else to get for next weekend.
     
  6. fish4stripers

    fish4stripers Senior Member

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    Awesome job guys! Nice creative way to beef up those swim shads
     
  7. Eastern Tackle

    Eastern Tackle Senior Member

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    Awesome job guys! Nice creative way to beef up those swim shads


    I'll bet you could do that with all kinds of different baits. Great idea guys.

    Pretty work as always Dom.
     
  8. TBaker

    TBaker Senior Member

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    To be more specific, a 7-inch Tsunami swim shad with the stock hook cut off, the assist hook put on a solid ring, and the solid ring attached to the swimbait via a split ring. He lightly hooked the assist hook in the shad body to keep it from fouling.

    Gotta love the creativity! Makes perfect sense, but not many people would try it. Great thinking! Btw, with a swim shad the action does effectively force you into a slower retrieve so maybe that was key.

    Great work, Dom and crew! We'll be back up soon! :)
     
  9. Enoch

    Enoch Senior Member

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    Awesome report.

    Enoch,
    Now we know what else to get for next weekend.

    LOL, Ty do you dare go to pick up some of them?
    I will watch you pitch that thing and wait before I latch one on. :eek:
     
  10. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Here is another writeup of the trip by Mike who caught tuna.

    First of all, I’d like to offer heartfelt thanks to Captain Dom for his drive, skill, determination, passion, and last but no least – his angelic disposition in the face of an unbelievable fustercluck created by what he so naively assumed were a team of expert anglers, who turned into a quartet of gibbering idiots when confronted with a pod of breaking fish. I’ve been there before, I knew I was powerless to stop it, so I just let my adrenal gland ride out the shaky-handed tunnel vision idiot phase of the proceedings without being too hard on myself and others around me. Except Willy – I yelled at him for no reason, but it was all tongue in cheek. I’m sure he enjoyed it. Seriously, if you have any interest at all in this sport, and watching triple digit tuna go airborne 50’ away doesn’t melt down your medulla oblongata, you should sell your Stellas and buy a nice set of golf clubs. Speaking of breaking fish – I’ve only seen shows with numbers and size to match what we’ve experienced yesterday once before – fishing YFT bird schools outside of the Clarion buffer zone on the Excel. It looked just like that, except for P-town in the background. This is sick, sick stuff. And I don’t mean P-town. Unfortunately, the fish we were after spoiled the analogy by being a hell of a lot harder to hook. There were only three boats out there, we had plenty of easy shots at the fish, and yet were rewarded with just a handful of hits from the targeted species. If my aim was to put meat in the boat rather than participate in gratuitous stunt fishing exercise, I’d insist that we stow the artificials and egg beaters, and pitch live baits with Avet 30’s or equivalent gear.

    As it were, I elected to go with a lure that I felt was the closest to real thing. I was going to keep quiet about it, as I certainly wouldn’t want to hurt Tackle House’s profit margins by suggesting that a $1.50 Tsunami will outproduce $60.00 Slutty Balyhoo, or whatever they call those lovely plugs, but Willy let the cat out of the bag. Lose lips sink corporate ships, young man. The above mentioned swimbait certainly looked very life like in the water, and my confidence in it was further buoyed when I claimed the prestigious title of shearwater high hook. When it got bit by the right kind, it was a very soft take on a slow retrieve. Initially I thought I had another bird, but then it gave a couple of headshakes as I reeled tight, and went down in the water column instead of up. The fish took what seemed like a whole minute to figure out that it was hooked, and then decided to cook my Zebco, which I screwed all the way down during the first run (it still wasn’t tight enough for our captain). This was the squirrellest fight I ever had with a tuna in that size class, probably because of the shallow water. It charged the boat twice so fast that I had trouble keeping up with it, and then proceeded to go under the boat at inopportune moments during the fight, which forced me to dunk my rod at least three times and wait it out. Once the fish settled, it was inevitably and savagely Dominated. There really isn’t much more to tell, other than that for once, the quote of the day belonged to yours truly: “Piece-of-sh!t-made-in-China, don’t fail me now!”

    In conclusion, I’d like to say that it was a fantastic day on the water despite the less than ideal conditions, owning in no small part to the make up of this charter. I hope we can manage to do this again.
     
  11. VaRandy

    VaRandy Site Sponsor

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    I would appreciate someone going over the rerigging of the Tsunumi. I am guessing a bait needle was needed?

    Thanx in advance

    These lures were made in Japan and then discontinued and were to be made in China. I didn't think they ever started that back up. Does anyone know?
     
  12. Albiemanmike

    Albiemanmike Senior Member

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    Kil,
    Mike's story was awesome and I laughed out loud reading it. Very articulate and hilarious at the same time. Sounds like you guy's really had a time of it, good that is.

    As for the rigging of the swim bait it looks pretty straight forward from the picture.

    1. Cut factory hook off of bait.
    2. Insert heavy duty split ring into eye of bait.
    3. Install solid ring onto split ring.
    4. Install assist hook onto solid ring ala butterfly jig.
    5. insert assist hook lightly and shallow into swimbait to alleviate fouling.

    I would assume that the assist hook and associated rigging is all pretty much carried outside of the swimbait so no need for rigging needle or complicated technique. I think part of the original creator of this great idea was to keep it simple and cheap and he accomplished that in spades. I only wish I had thought of it myself but thanks go out to the guy who did think of it and for the guy who shared it with us all I hope your buddy doesn't string you up for sharing his idea.
     
  13. bigscrnman

    bigscrnman Senior Member

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    had similar idea a while ago , glad they tried with the Tsunami shad but I think any large shad will work.
    This is what I was fouling with on my shads , I rig the assist hook true the swim bait making sure that the hook comes out from the belly right under the gills. Them I attached a fisherman 250lb ss swivel with a split ring , split ring true the eye of the hook.
    Personally I think that options are endless when it comes to fishing , if you have imagination just give it a try it might work or not at least you,ve tried


    ;) Why don't you send me a couple of those to "test" behind some shrimp boats later this month!?!?!?:D
     
  14. jig

    jig Senior Member

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    I love to create as much as everyone. But sometimes our creating is just for the sake of creating. The lure I have caught more yft on than anything is the simple storm wildeye, either in 6in or 9in, stock. I realize for you might need a bit more stout hook for bft, but the lure itself is a fishcatcher. just food for thought before we all spend $30 modifiying a $2 lure.
     
  15. Albiemanmike

    Albiemanmike Senior Member

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    the stock hook will not stand up to the BFT that are in residence in CC Bay right now unless you are lucky enough to hook into the smaller variety in the 40-50" class and even then I know some guy's had problems with that size fish and Owner jigs last year. I think Kil's modification is right on the money for using the swim baits for these fish. Doesn't hurt the action of the bait and gives you the needed hook strength to land these beasts.