Tady / Salas jigs; Tuna Sniper rod

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by JayP, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. JayP

    JayP Member

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    I'm fairly new to vertical jigging but did a fair amount off the coast of VA last year and had success with bluefin, cobia, and bottom fish. Mostly the fish that we caught were within 30 feet of the bottom, and it seemed easier to mark bait and and/or fish on the sonar down deep where there's less noise and the sonar cone is bigger.

    On some days we outfished the trollers and chunkers, but on other days the trollers were catching fish up in the water column when we weren't seeing any fish or bait on the sonar. I know the fish were in the general area from the trollers catching them, but jigging up in the water column felt like finding a needle in a haystack and we didn't have much luck with that at all. I'm pretty sure if there were fish within striking distance they would have hit, unless they were scared off by the boat... How close beneath the boat have you caught tuna?

    On the West Coast fishing sites there's a lot about Tady and Salas style jigs / irons where you cast out as far as possible, let the lure sink and then retrieve it and it has a swimming action. They use them for YFT, wahoo, and a bunch of other species. I'm just curious why nobody on these forums has mentioned this style of lure? Is it that they're not as good on the East Coast or Gulf for some reason, or maybe people just haven't tried them much?

    Anyway I went ahead and bought some just to try to fill that gap between vertical jigging and popping, hoping to cover more water than vertical jigging but still get down maybe 50 feet below the surface. These jigs are about the same weight as poppers and probably could be thrown well with a a popping rod, so I'm looking at getting a OTI Tuna Sniper to serve dual duty to throw these jigs and poppers, but can't decide between the 60 and 80 lb rod. The 60 lb one would probably cast these weights farther but I'm not sure how much fish handling capability would be lost vs. the 80 lb rod(?) All the tuna I saw last year were under 100 lb, but we caught or hooked up with several in the 80-90 lb range and I was using 16 lb drag.
     
  2. papio

    papio Senior Member

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    I still use my Tadys and Salas jigs from time to time. I caught my first YFT on a Tady and still use them for topwater and sub surface application. I like to skip the lure across the water which drives the tunas crazy. I carry a variety of Tadys, Salas, and Sumos along with a good mix of Japanese style long /short jigs. Works for me.

    Why not PM TJ and request to have both rods send to you for fondling then u can decide which u want. But be warn, you're likely will want to buy both, hehehe. Good luck and good fishing.
     

  3. mcgolfer

    mcgolfer Guest

    jayp
    the 40/60 tuna sniper will fit your application best. the 60/80 might be overkill for those smaller tuna's.....
     
  4. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    I recommend 60/80 Tuna Sniper as I expect bigger bluefin in 100 -150 lbs tuna, but don't expect to catch many tuna casting Tady/Salas unless you cast several hours like trolling.
    Most tuna on the lumps are deep near the bottom. I found they start biting as soon as sun is up and stop biting by mid days.
    The reason we don't use West Coast irons, they don't work as good as our tuna jigs like hammered diamond jigs, metallic sardine jigs, Luhr Jensens' Stinger, Seven Sea's Hooker jigs, etc. They were desinged mosly as casting irons though some are for deep jigging. Among West Coast irons, I found sumo jigs work best. But I can be wrong as I didn't spend extensive time for West Coast irons.
    Fishordie said Raider irons work great for tuna for him.
     
  5. Grescobia

    Grescobia Senior Member

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    I have used the tady jigs scooting them across the surface when the ytf are around at night and have some of the most vicious strikes that almost pull the rod from my hands. Its a great way to catch yft at night .The trebles have to be replaced with a siwash hook as the trebles were constanly being straighten out .
     
  6. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    I have used the tady jigs scooting them across the surface when the ytf are around at night and have some of the most vicious strikes that almost pull the rod from my hands. Its a great way to catch yft at night .The trebles have to be replaced with a siwash hook as the trebles were constanly being straighten out .
    I always thought West Coast casting irons should work for yft or bft at floaters at night as they are feeding close to the surface.
    But there is minimum surface action in Va water.
     
  7. JayP

    JayP Member

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    I recommend 60/80 Tuna Sniper as I expect bigger bluefin in 100 -150 lbs tuna, but don't expect to catch many tuna casting Tady/Salas unless you cast several hours like trolling.
    Most tuna on the lumps are deep near the bottom. I found they start biting as soon as sun is up and stop biting by mid days.
    The reason we don't use West Coast irons, they don't work as good as our tuna jigs like hammered diamond jigs, metallic sardine jigs, Luhr Jensens' Stinger, Seven Sea's Hooker jigs, etc. They were desinged mosly as casting irons though some are for deep jigging. Among West Coast irons, I found sumo jigs work best. But I can be wrong as I didn't spend extensive time for West Coast irons.
    Fishordie said Raider irons work great for tuna for him.
    We also found that the bluefin bite slowed down by around 11 AM but picked up again around 2-3 PM. The bait and fish seemed to disperse on the sonar and looked like the bait was rising off the bottom during that time. Or maybe the bait and tuna were blending in with all of the surface noise on the sonar? We had luck with hammered diamond, OTI jager, and Shimano butterfly.

    During times when vertical jigging isn't working, at least this is something else to try. I don't expect to catch a whole lot casting these irons - it seems like blind casting is still a needle in a haystack only with a bigger needle. Trolling is probably the most effective way to catch fish blind, but I prefer a more active style of fishing. In some situations like maybe over the canyons or where there's some kind of indicator like slicks, birds, floating objects, or rips to concentrate fish, the odds might go up considerably. I'm also hoping to maybe luck into a wahoo or something in deeper water, or at least a gaffer dolphin or something.

    We didn't see any YFT last year but I'm hoping maybe some show up this year. From what I'm reading on these forums people haven't had a whole lot of luck vertical jigging for YFT so that's one reason I'd like to try out these jigs, which from what I'm reading have kind of a slower swimming action that the fish might prefer, and I figure if they work for YFT on the West Coast maybe they will work on the East Coast also.
     
  8. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Yes, they bites later sometimes, but not always.
    My theory is they actually leave the lumps in midday and spreaded out as I don't see many marks in mid day and I don't see many marks until sun is up.
    When yft are around they hit jig deep. I caught many yft on jigs at parking lot, hambone or hot dog areas years ago when yft were around.
    I rarely caught any tuna on jigs less than 50 ft except in Gulf of Mexico.
     
  9. Tunanorth

    Tunanorth Senior Member

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    The "West Coast" jigs like Tady, Salas and Sumo have worked great every time I have visited "back east", mostly Florida.
    My first trip to Islamorada in 1991 resulted in our party literally using up Bud and Mary's Marina's YEARLY allocation of amberjack tags in just 3 days of fishing.
    As we headed home, we asked if they would start fishing with jigs more often, the reply was: "That was interesting, but we don't fish that way here."
    They also work very well in Hawaii, Panama, Costa Rica, Giant halibut and lingcod in Alaska, and I have even heard about NZ.
    Essentially if you have "warmwater" species like tuna, amberjack, wahoo, yellowtail [kingfish], etc. they will work well.
    Like anything, there are plenty of subtleties and specific do's/don'ts to catch the most fish.
    Also like anything in fishing, the best choice can change quickly, and "Japanese-style" or even "Nordic-style" offerings work best.
    Best suggestion would be to simply hang out on one of the California sites like Allcoast or Bloody Decks to catch some of the many details.
     
  10. califisherman

    califisherman Junior member

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    I use the Tady and Salas all the time here in the Gulf 45 and 77 blue and chrome blue and white white and red. Last trip 77 blue and chrome was the ticket.It out performed all the other top water baits.
     
  11. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    i always bring tady's along on GOM trips........but rarely use them due to fancy swimbaits working so well :) that being said I definitely think they'll work great and do plan on using them.

    I am bringing some to panama to try there as well for roosterfish and perhaps tuna. my fear with smaller lures and having cuberas around is that its easy for a cubera to put a small lure in its mouth completely, and bite through your leader.

    as always, you never know until you try it.
     
  12. Tunanorth

    Tunanorth Senior Member

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    Bret,
    I have never found roosters to be very willing biters on California-style jigs [iron as we call them], other than very rarely while using the "skipjig" technique.
    However, I have caught a fair number of roosters on "normal priced" swimbaits, although I have refused to throw those expensive $40-plus versions anywhere there are fish with teeth around, I'm sure they'd bite those!
    Cuberas [and most snappers] do enjoy the western jigs a lot.
    I think it's on the Pesca Panama website's front page, there's a pic of a nice snapper [pargo down there] with a blue/white Salas 6X in its mouth.
     
  13. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    im going to bring quite a few lures to panama, including the irons. thanks for the tip though.......this will be my first roosterfish assuming i catch one
     
  14. JayP

    JayP Member

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    1
    The "West Coast" jigs like Tady, Salas and Sumo have worked great every time I have visited "back east", mostly Florida.
    My first trip to Islamorada in 1991 resulted in our party literally using up Bud and Mary's Marina's YEARLY allocation of amberjack tags in just 3 days of fishing.
    As we headed home, we asked if they would start fishing with jigs more often, the reply was: "That was interesting, but we don't fish that way here."
    They also work very well in Hawaii, Panama, Costa Rica, Giant halibut and lingcod in Alaska, and I have even heard about NZ.
    Essentially if you have "warmwater" species like tuna, amberjack, wahoo, yellowtail [kingfish], etc. they will work well.
    Like anything, there are plenty of subtleties and specific do's/don'ts to catch the most fish.
    Also like anything in fishing, the best choice can change quickly, and "Japanese-style" or even "Nordic-style" offerings work best.
    Best suggestion would be to simply hang out on one of the California sites like Allcoast or Bloody Decks to catch some of the many details.
    Thanks for the encouragement, I'm heading to Key West next month and am taking an assortment. I'm thinking they should be good for cudas, crevalle jacks, cobia, and king mackerel for starters, and other things down deep out past the reef. One thing I can't wait to try is throwing a big surface lure like a 7X or 7X super on the flats and skitter it across the water, and hopefully get a 20+ lb cuda to explode on it...now that would be quite a sight in shallow water! We saw some big ones last year.
     
  15. Bellyups

    Bellyups Senior Member

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    How many people tip these jigs with strips of bait? I remember fishing an offshore rig in the GOM one winter about 11 years ago with one of my westcoast buddies and he caught 9 big redfish on a salas tipped with a strip of fish while we caught one redfish on livebait. A redfish isn't a yft, but these jigs work for reds under the right circumstances.