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Seems on another board the claim is that mono would win. I find it hard to believe, but I thought someone here might have done some actual testing to know for sure which would win out. Anyone checked this out before?

So the scenario is say, 100# mono vs 100# spectra (or both at 60#), both lines cross or wrap and both fish are still taking line. Which line will tend to break first?
 

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Seems on another board the claim is that mono would win. I find it hard to believe, but I thought someone here might have done some actual testing to know for sure which would win out. Anyone checked this out before?

So the scenario is say, 100# mono vs 100# spectra (or both at 60#), both lines cross or wrap and both fish are still taking line. Which line will tend to break first?

Unsure about exactly what your asking, but if the spectra is taught it will cut the mono rather quickly

d-a
 

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Unsure about exactly what your asking, but if the spectra is taught it will cut the mono rather quickly

d-a

Exactly!
 

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he's saying if equal pound test spectra and mono cross each other with a fish on both lines which line will cut the other line....






and the answer is.........































SPECTRA EASILY!!! ;) :p
 

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Part of the issue is that Spectra melts at about 150 Deg C and nylon melts at about +220 Deg C and leads some to believe that nylon will outlast the spectra

The key issue is pressure, spectra is a lot thinner than nylon for the same BS and for the same tension spectra exerts about 4 times as much pressure on the nylon as the nylon exerts on the spectra.

In the situation of the query its likely both will survive.if both anglers are smart & back off the drag till the crossover is sorted.

In the real world of a variety of situations there is no guaranteed winner.
basically whichever is moving the faster is likely to survive the longest.
Whichever one stops moving under pressure while the other keeps moving will lose.
 

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dennis is correct if you cross lines and one line is stripping off a reel and the other stationary the moving line wins . blue fin fishermen loose a few anchours to nylon cutting thick anchour ropes on the fishes first run .
 

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I had small fish 74" that was about 300lbs bite two lines once. It hit the planer which was pretty much all spectra, then ate the center rigger on its way out of town, which was all mono and floro.

After pulling on the two lines equally for during the first run, the mono broke.

Just a related story. When I landed it, I recovered both rigs from its mouth. It was sort of weird, because at first I had thought it was two different fish and one had broke off. He wanted to be much bigger than he was, but I can assure you he won't get any bigger. :)
 

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I have to disagree about whichever line is moving wins and stick with just spectra wins. I've hooked fish on mono that were peeling line and crossed a stationary spectra rig and next thing I know, before I can even blink, my line was sliced right through like a hot knife through butter. Maybe it's only me but I could never image mono winning against spectra. Maybe pametfisher wants to give us the physics on this?! :)
 

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The Physics of the situation of one moving & one stationary line
is that heat is generated by the friction.
the moving line is only subjected to minimal friction and heat in any portion and is rapidly cooled as it moves past the stationary line.
The stationary line however is subject to heat buildup in the one place and melts.............. as water cannot get in to cool the contact point and both spectra and mono have low thermal conduction properties , so the water on the non-contact area cannot cool the line as fast as the friction is generating heat in the contact area.

It might seem counter-intuitive as both lines are immersed in water, but a Polyethylene anchor rope is melted by thin spectra or mono passing over it.

Heat is the typical issue in crossed lines not abrasion.

Where crossed lines are observed with significant lengths of what appears to be surface abrasion this is typically the result of friction generating sufficient heat to soften the surface and be "balled" by the other line slipping down it.
( this is the same effect caused by pulling a Uni knot together dry ...........same deal when pulling even a wet Uni knot...........so pulling it down should be SLOW ).

Real abrasion can be experienced from braided spectra which has a buildup of dried salt in the braid. Salt is very abrasive & is slow to re-absorb into solution in the water. The wear rate from abrasion is much much slower than the heat from melting, as the increased friction from any salt buildup increases the friction and thence the rate of heat generation.
 

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I have to disagree about whichever line is moving wins and stick with just spectra wins. I've hooked fish on mono that were peeling line and crossed a stationary spectra rig and next thing I know, before I can even blink, my line was sliced right through like a hot knife through butter. Maybe it's only me but I could never image mono winning against spectra. Maybe pametfisher wants to give us the physics on this?! :)

DenisB gave a good description of where the heat gets generated. The stationary line is a sitting duck ... or should I say roasting duck?

One more knot example: if you take a P.R., SIG, MID, and it slips on the Mono/Fluoro a quarter to a half inch while it's being tightened, the braid will usually snap immediately ... if you're lucky. If you're unlucky, you just go fishing with a heat damaged line. Of course the same is true with any knot in braid.

More good reasons to use loops and hollow-weave line! ;)
 

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On my recent EXCEL trip, one angler was hooked up to a huge yellowfin, around 350lb said Captain Fleck when he saw it at deep color. He was on the bow, fighting the fish for over an hour. Another angler in the stern (124 feet away) hooked a striped marlin and that fish ran straight up the side of the boat. His spectra sawed right through the 300lb wind-on leader instantly and there goes the tuna.
 
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