Slow Jigging and Light Jigging Thread

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by angryangler, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    I've been mixing in slow jigging in some and sometimes all of my jigging outings. It's a great piece to add to your artificial or jig fishing arsenal. Slow jigging seems to be sweeping all over the world, as I receive lots of information from many forums and social media. I can say that on behalf of myself, that it has produced some great catches and more often strikes than other jigging methods. It's a continual learning process and I feel that if we share our experiences we can learn together.

    I just wanted to start this thread so that we all could share what we know about this fairly new technique. I will continue to pass on good info for all of you who are interested.

    Here is just a start. This is a video that explains the basics. You gotta start somewhere and I feel like this a great video that is very clear on important components and methods.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxMtPcjVGgc#t=20
     
  2. Depraved

    Depraved Cabo is a POS

    927
    164
    The 2 palms made is great also
     

  3. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    Do you have one Depraved? I'd love to know more about the model or models you have. Our market is limited to a few rods here in the US.
     
    Nick Mosaquites likes this.
  4. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
  5. Depraved

    Depraved Cabo is a POS

    927
    164
    I was actually referring to the 2 slow pitch videos palms made. I do have a palms 634sf but haven't had a chance to use it yet unfortunately.
     
    angryangler likes this.
  6. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    Let us know once you do. I am personally interested
     
  7. Depraved

    Depraved Cabo is a POS

    927
    164
    Will do, I have only been tog fishing lately and they don't hit jigs for me lol
     
  8. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    I've never Tog fished, but wonder if an Inciku in a brown/blue color might entice them. Very slow presentation. Blue body and brown/glow squid drifting on the bottom, simulating a crab???
     
  9. HungryJack

    HungryJack Member

    4,686
    1,608
    I can guarantee you,
    the day the first jig was ever used,
    wherever in the world that might have been in past history,
    the very first time the jig was used,
    and subsequently afterwards for hundreds of years,
    "slow jigging" was the technique.

    While maybe "new" to the high tech jigging crowd,
    it was invented on day one of a jig being used.


    Congrats on realizing that keeping the jig in the strike zone,
    instead of speed trolling it through the water column, is more productive.
     
  10. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    Yes, I realize what you are saying Hungry. I'm not that wet behind the ears.

    I know what bucktails, viking jigs, diamond jigs, jig heads with rubber bodies are used for and that are continuously being used. I wouldn't discount those at all.

    However metal jigs, again Designed by the Japanese, with a flat side and a rounded, keeled side are what we now call slow jigs. They come in various shapes, some tailweighted, some centerweighted and when coupled with the right rod, reel, and technique present, in my opinion, a very different way that definitely works.

    Thanks for your input :)
     
    Hoogan likes this.
  11. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

    11,821
    1,393
    Cod jigging has been around for several hundred years. Squidding used for cod jigging which is a kind of slow jigging has been around at least 50 years.
    You get some idea from slow pitch jigging from Japan and you can develop your own jigging style.


    ----------------


    www.jignpop.com
    www.jignpopforum.com
    www.blackholeUSA.com
     
  12. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    In slow pitch jigging, the "Fall" of the jig is what gets the strikes. Some slow jigs slide, some wobble, some slide and wobble and they all have different hang times. Some slow fall and some a fast erratic fall.

    Here is a quote from Sensei Totos of Japanese Anglers secret (He is the pupil of Sensei Sato who has been given credit for developing the style of slow jigging)

    "You never know what triggers the fish to react to your jig, but basically, the slow-pitch jigging has learned that it’s when the jig is on its side, the horizontal position, and when the jig is falling, going downward, that it attracts most bites. In other words, these are the moments when the jig is free on its own, when you are not doing anything to the jig. Slow pitch jigging wants to maximize those moments. You do less. Get the jig horizontal. Let it swim on its own. And let it fall."

    What I've come to notice, to be the difficult part is the preparation. Tying your own proper slow jigging hooks, having an arsenal of slow jigs that work in different currents, for different targets, and different depths and then by your own trial and error figuring out what works best in your current situation. Having the right rod for either a long jerk style or for slow jerk. You have to learn the tackle and you will then open up more possibilities.

    Again, I am way at the beginning of the learning curve but I am eager to learn. I have been at it for at least a year now and prior I was utilizing other techniques such as inckiku and mai dai jigging. These have all been successful so I am intrigued to learn more.
     
  13. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

    11,821
    1,393
    Which Evergreen slow pitch jigging rods do you want to have ?
     
  14. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

    11,821
    1,393
    East Coast Style Slow Jigging

    Slow jigging has been around in the East Coast for decades.
    The concept is somewhat different from Japanese style slow pitch jigging style.

    There are two different styles of East Coast slow jiggings. One is to lift jigs slowly and drop and the other is to crank jigs slowly and drop.

    The concept is to imitate injured bait fish. The first style is to imitate injured bait fish escaping/falling slowly and the second style is to imitate injured bait fish moving slowly.

    The first technique is widely used for tuna, cod, seabass, grouper or snapper, etc.
    The second technique is used for cod or seabass. I even caught grouper using this technique.


    -------------


    www.jignpop.com
    www.jignpopforum.com
    www.blackholeUSA.com
     
  15. HungryJack

    HungryJack Member

    4,686
    1,608
    Maybe not wet, but certainly damp back there.
    And brainwashed from very effective marketing techniques.

    All those shapes you describe have all been produced by jig makers in many countries
    around the world, including the US many decades ago.

    New names were given to them, such as, centerweighted and tailweighted, etc,
    and they become a new technique/invention to those wet behind the ears,
    lacking the history, experience and knowledge to know any better.

    FYI- the very first jig ever used in history was an Asymmetrical jig,
    but according to you that would be a recent invention by the Japanese.

    Most people on this site never jigged before 2000,
    fishermen with a bit more fishing experience have fished the many
    methods that are supposedly new techniques today.

    Only thing new today in the jigging world compared to yesterday,
    is the fisherman willingness to spend obscene money on jigs,
    and the amount of new terminal tackle created in response to
    the declining fishing and knot skills of today's "fisherman"
     
    Accolade and Kblue like this.
  16. HungryJack

    HungryJack Member

    4,686
    1,608
    Anybody with any jigging experience using a conventional reel could have told you the bites come on the fall.

    All the modern jiggers with their spinning reels, miss these bites, because of reel choice.
    Next the marketing guru's will tell you that a conventional reel is required for proper slow jigging.

    Reread your paragraph, you are in love with the tackle, not necessarily the fishing itself.
    Hundreds of millions of fish were caught slow jigging in the past, with rods that were designed
    for bait fishing or even trolling, using the jigs available at the time.

    All it takes to get your jig sideways, the Japanese secret of slow jigging
    is putting slack in your line on the drop.
    This can be done with any rod, including a broom stick,
    or no rod at all, with a hand line.

    Today, the fishermen needs specialized rods, jigs, swinging hooks, to do the same,
    which is catch some fish ?????

    Like micro jigging,
    buying specialized tackle to catch trash fish.
     
    Kblue likes this.
  17. BloodyL

    BloodyL Member

    119
    12
    Well aren't you the oracle of all things jigging related!
     
    Bshaw, DoubleA, tugasangler and 6 others like this.
  18. angryangler

    angryangler Senior Member

    3,324
    585
    Thank you Kil for your input. You have proven yourself to be an accomplished angler and jig fisherman by your wonderful reports and pictures of caught fish.

    Some people just talk about fishing and have nothing to show and then speak into the forum and forum members in a condescending tone. All that does is ruin a thread that may benefit others.

    Let's keep it positive and current. It is now 2015 and we are aspiring to use cutting edge tackle to produce phenomenal catches.

    I just got a Limited Shimano Ocea Jigger 1500 HG, I haven't put line on it but I'm quite excited to put it through its paces. I have been using Trinidads for my slow jigging reels, which have been great
    for the OJ has some great bells and whistles.



    My next purchase is likely to be an Evergreene Poseidon slow jerker 634. This is, what most hardcore slow jiggers, believe to be the "Holy Grail" or the chosen rod.........lol

    Here is a pic of the new OJ 1500 HG Limited, she's waiting for her Poseidon..........lol

    20150102_111109.jpg
     
  19. Mark Harris

    Mark Harris Junior member

    579
    331
    Getting back to the point of this thread.,.....

    I think this video is very useful. Whilst it is clearly aimed at Blue Blue jigs from a jetty, the techniques demonstrated are very applicable to any slow fall jig, from a boat or land-based.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2gEqXbjoDQ
     
    angryangler likes this.
  20. Mark Harris

    Mark Harris Junior member

    579
    331
    Whether you need to spend a lot of money on specialist kit for this type of jigging is totally up to the angler.

    Personally, even though I REALLY enjoy this type of jigging, I do not do enough of it to warrant spending $1,500 or so on a specialist rod and reel. Instead I improvise using a longish standard light jigging rod and a 4000 sized spinner.
     
    cubanfishermar and lite-liner like this.