Rod Spining

Discussion in 'Rods and Rod Blanks' started by Stryper, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. Stryper

    Stryper Senior Member

    782
    5
    Hi Ya'll,
    A friend gave me a couple of prototype jigging rods, (he's an importer)
    and I thought being I didn't have any money in them I would get the guides set as a spiral/acid wrapped configuration.
    So I went to my local wrapper and he spun the rod and seems they are both off as to the spine. So once he showed me how to do it, I tried the rest of my rods to practice/check my newfound knowledge.
    Seems all but 2 were spot on!! but the ones that were not are my latest hitech 2 piece rods which shall remain nameless. They seem to have been wrapped 180 off. I am going to check out some others where I got them to see if I just got unlucky as it were.
    But now, I can check any rods I buy out in the future though. Do ya'll regularly check spining before you buy rods?
     
  2. hamptonsurf

    hamptonsurf Senior Member

    1,263
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    seems odd to me....are you saying they were built as a conventional should bend, but with spinning guides?

    If you pick up a rod that is already built and j=you even give it a wiggle, you should notice if it was correct or now. Were these 2 piece rods 7 foot 6, by any chance?
     

  3. SteelingHeads

    SteelingHeads Senior Member

    731
    13
    Stryper,

    If the spine was 180 out as you say, it shouldn't matter. You can build on either side of the spine. What you don't want is a rod that is 90 degrees off on the spine. I understand what you mean though as a rod has a natural slight bend that is normally on the spine.
     
  4. Taz575

    Taz575 Senior Member

    1,334
    9
    The spine will change when you build it due to the guides supporting the blank. Honestly, I don't even bother to spine my rods, but build on the straightest axis. Spining doesn't really mean much anymore because the spine changes depending on where the wraps of material overlap in the actual blank, especially composites. The tip, mid and butt section can have spines in different places! Most spines aren't even 180 degrees apart. Spine doesn't matter as much as people try to make it out to!

    Spine has nothing to do with rod twist either, like most try to claim! I've built tuna trolling full roller guides off spine (on the straight axis) w/o any twisting. Spinning rods are stable due to the guides being on the bottom, and spiral wraps bring the line to the bottom, which makes it stable. Conventional rods are unstable due to gravity; the line wants to go to the bottom and will often twist the guides that way.

    If they are 180 degrees off, it could be for a reason. Hard spine down, better ability to fight the fish. Soft spine on the bottom, may be better casting, according to the old rules that many makers don't follow anymore because they didn't make much difference!

    A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing, as is shown here. Now you are sour on certain rods because of a supposed spine issue? You don't want to mention names, but you list OTI as the brand in the top of your post! The 2 that were off are 180 degrees to the supposed spine, yet you are all in an uproar about it??? Unless you are in a casting competition and may win by a foot or two (if it makes that much difference!), spine the blanks. Spining isn't all it made out to be, many old school rod builders make it out to be some mysterious secret. My rods cast long and straight w/o spining them!
     
  5. Stryper

    Stryper Senior Member

    782
    5
    I tried to delete this thread when I realized I had posted the manufacturer. My sincere appoligies.
    I really don't think I will have my drag so hi as to ever break the rod so its really a non issue.
    As for being sour on a brand, considering I bought 5 new OTI's in the last 3 months? I actually really like e'm.
    A little knowledge being a dangerous thing ? I kinda proved that eh? <g>
    But back to the spining/splining thing, your take is it's irrelevent then? My point was I tried out my other 11 rods and other than the 2 freebies I just picked up, they all flopped the same.
    I'm not going to lose sleep over it, just found it to be curious. And once again I appoligise if I disparedged anyone, I like my OTI's.
     
  6. Taz575

    Taz575 Senior Member

    1,334
    9
    LOL! I just ordered 7 OTI blanks this week :)

    "Spline" has an interesting history. It was actually a typo in one of the original rod building books that people caught and ran with it!! Kinda funny when you think about it! It was supposed to be "spine", but "spline" made it in the books and has been used since!

    Spine has a VERY small effect on the rod, but I would bet 99%-99.9% of people couldn't notice a difference. That tiny amount that would notice it would be a very advanced casting person or a very light power rod with a very noticeable spine. I started off spining my rods, and then during testing and use, found no difference in how they fish or cast that I could tell! People figured that the Hard Side on top would make it cast better because it would push more on the lure and increase the speed slightly. They also say the hard side down would put more pressure on the fish because the fish will have to work against a stiffer part of the rod. In reality, you don't notice it. The casting advantage is moot because who can cast in a perfect plane anyway?? Also, casting rods are supposed to be cast with the spool perpendicular to the ground, so the spine would have to be 90 degrees off to benefit the casting!

    When I was spining rods, the tip, mid and lower section would be different. It depends on where you check the spine! These were St Croix blanks, too...very straight and nice! It doesn't hurt the rod to spine it, but just because a rod is off spine doesn't make it a bad rod! If you think about it, the guide feet will make the blank feel stiffer because they splint the blank a little, but the extra weight softens the action a little because it is adding more weight to the blank, so it feels that the spine is aligned with the feet on many rods! Make the rod a little heavier and softer feeling, then put metal splints lined up on one side, and it would feel like it was the spine!

    I build on the straightest axis, that way everything is lined up. If there is a curve in the rod, I would rather have it on top of the rod so the weight of the guides will straighten it out, which usually works very well! That way the rod tip is lined up with the reel and guides, so it will cast straighter.

    Spine has a small effect on the rod, but it usually isn't very noticeable at all. I haven't noticed it affecting any of the rods I have built, and neither have my customers!
     
  7. DANTE25

    DANTE25 Senior Member

    311
    1
    I HAVE TO DISAGREE WITH THE LAST POST WHEN IT SAY'S THE SLPINE DOSENT MATTER. IN FACT THE SPLINE ON A ROD MEANS A LOT. THIS IS ALSO THE REASON I WILL ONLY FISH A CUSTOM ROD, 99 PERCENT OF THE STORE BOUGHT RODS YOU BUY ARE NOT SPLINED CORRECTLY THUS THE REASON FOR ROD BREAKAGE AND PEOPLE SAYIGN THERE ROD IS LEANING ONE WAY. I WAS ACTUALLY GOIGN TO START A POST ON THIS

    ACID WRAPPED RODS, OK THESE RODS MIGHT LOOK GOOD BUT THERE IS NO REASON FOR THEM, IF YOU HAVE A GOOD ROD BUILDER WHO KNOWS HOW TO PROPERLY SPLINE HIS RODS AND PUT THE GUIDES IN THE CORRECT PLACMENT YOU WILL NEVER HAVE THIS ISSUE, I HEAR PEOPLE CRYING ALL THE TIME ON HOW THERE CONV ROD ROLLS ON THEM AND THEY DONT FEEL THE STRAIGHT STRENGHT THEY NEED, REASON BEING THERE ROD IS NOT SPLINED CORRECTLY. A ROD WILL ALSO ROLL TO THE SPLINE THUS THE REASON FOR THE ROLLING IF BUILT CORRECTLY YOU WILL NEVER HAVE THIS ISSUE I HAVE BEEN USING NORMAL CON RODS FOR YEARS AND HAEV CAUGHT HUNDREDS OF TUNA WITH OUT A ISSUE, SO BEFORE YOU GO OUT AND SPEND EXTRA MONEY ON A ACID WRAPPED ROD TAKE MY ADVICE.
    DANTE
     
  8. paul708

    paul708 Site Sponsor

    4,184
    197
    i build on spine.
    i was taught that way.

    some say it doesnt matter. i have not bought into that web findings yet.

    we teach our students to build on spine.
    there are a few engineers in our club that have done test about spine. and effect, WE build on spine.


    conventional rods will always have the line trying to get to the bottom, which will cause some twist and torque..as more pressure is applied.
    even if built on spine.

    ACID Does keep the rod stable..and doesnt cost EXTRA

    so if you go acid you should not have to PAY MORE..
     
  9. Eastern Tackle

    Eastern Tackle Senior Member

    1,660
    33
    i build on spine.
    i was taught that way.

    some say it doesnt matter. i have not bought into that web findings yet.

    we teach our students to build on spine.
    there are a few engineers in our club that have done test about spine. and effect, WE build on spine.


    conventional rods will always have the line trying to get to the bottom, which will cause some twist and torque..as more pressure is applied.
    even if built on spine.

    ACID Does keep the rod stable..and doesnt cost EXTRA

    so if you go acid you should not have to PAY MORE..


    This post is exactly why you build ALL my rods. Plus you build on a two guide transition.

    .....My conventionals will always be acid wrapped, because it is simply the best way to fish conventionals.

    I caught a tuna once.
     
  10. Taz575

    Taz575 Senior Member

    1,334
    9
    First off, caps lock being stuck on is considered yelling and rude.

    2nd off, I disagree with your post. I have built numerous rods and have played with building on spine/off spine and seeing the difference it makes, which in my testing has shown it makes very little difference and most people cannot tell the difference! What they can see is that the rod is kept much more stable while fighting a fish, reeling, etc, with the spiral wrap and they have less forearm and wrist fatigue after fighting the fish. I built a 40-100# Calstar 655XH tuna trolling rod off spine with a full set of All American rollers. No twist; the rollers are fairly low to the blank and the rod has enough stiffness to it to not make it twist, even when dealing with higher amounts of drag. I prefer to build on the straight axis so everything lines up the way it should. People notice straight, but are usually clueless on spine unless clued in by some "master rod builder" who has to educate his customers on how much a difference "spine" or "spline" makes on the rod and why they should buy from him and then teaches them how to "spine" every other rod in their arsenal to convince them they need to buy more of his rods. How many people noticed any "spine" issues with their rods until they were clued in by the rodbuilder?

    Rod twist has nothing to do with spine. Period. The spine changes on the blank depending on where you measure it. Try it some time with a blank, not a built rod! The guides, wraps, epoxy, etc all affect how the rod will bend and it's "spine". The composite blanks really show this because of the different materials meeting at different points on the blank. I've tried it with several blanks and the tip, mid and lower portion of the blank have the spine are different areas. So which do you use??? I've never felt a spinning rod twist in my hands from being off spine, have you??

    Twist on a rod is from gravity. The fish don't always fight nice and straight up and down. If the line moves out from the center of the blank (how far off it can handle w/o rolling depends on the guide height, AKA leverage the line has against the blank), the line will try to go to the bottom of the rod and will pull the guides that way. Lower guides will reduce this tendency to twist, as will stiffer rods. A tuna rod that barely bends won't twist much because it is the blank itself resisting the twisting! A limber jigging rod for tuna will often twist a good amount because the blank will move and flex easily. I've seen conventionals rods twist the guides 90 degrees to the side on tuna. Rod twist like that is not good for the blank and is worse on the blank than building off spine!

    Acid rods sometimes cost less, because less guides and smaller guides can be used to achieve correct static testing due to the fact that they do not have to keep the line off of the blank. I did some conventionals and I was able to use much lighter and smaller guides on the spiral wraps compared to the conventionals on the same blanks due to this, which makes the rod lighter, more sensitive and saves on component cost and labor.

    Spine has little to due with rod breakage. The vast majority of rod breakage while fishing has to do with "operator error", which few people like to admit. Fishing a rod way outside of the line/lure ratings, high sticking it, slamming it down into a rail, locking down the drag higher than the rod is designed to handle, a defect in the blank, etc cause more breakage than spine does! The majority of rods are broken in transit (car doors), so how does spine affect this? Like I said before, I've built rods off spine and on the straight axis of the blank, and I haven't had breakage problems. Static testing, guide placement, height, etc are all things I tweak so that they are right for each rod I build. Some issues of using guides that are too tall, not testing the guide placement against the amount of drag the rod can handle, etc can lead to problems that are unrelated to the spine, but many still try to blame the spine!

    Spine is a concept that has been examined by numerous people. Many builder still build on the spine; nothing wrong with that and it may give the rod a teeny bit of an advantage, but in reality most people wouldn't notice the difference. Most people, however, would notice a crooked rod and not want to buy it! Most of the spines on rods are not 180 degrees apart anyway, so if you build on one spine, it will be off on the other one. Also, with casting, you would have to cast in a near perfectly straight plane in line with the spine to reap the benefits of it. When casting bait casting reels, most turn the reel to one side, so the spine would be 90 degrees to the left or right for casting, and would be worse for fighting fish and cause twist according to you! So are those rods properly spined or not?? Most factories build on the straightest axis because people don't want to buy a crooked rod. Most of their breakage is from operator error, not from building off spine!

    It's funny how people mention spine with conventionals, but never mention it with spinning rods usually. Spinning rods are stable due to their guide setup (guides on the bottom, line in the bottom of the guide, gravity pulling the line down, etc), so there is no twist. On a conventional, the guides are on top and everyone assumes the twist is due to being off spine, never thinking that the guide placement may be causing it! I've seen rods built on spine twist under heavy loads and I have seen rods built off spine not twist.

    Like most things, there are two sides to every argument. I build on the straightest axis for the vast majority of rods I built because that is what customers want. A customer will not want a rod that is crooked but built on spine, and it sucks to have to ship blanks back and forth to get a perfectly straight one (it is very rare to have a perfectly straight blank!) and delay the customers order. Spining does not hurt the rod and may enhance it slightly, but for the vast majority of anglers out there, they will not feel the difference. Line twist is from gravity, not the spine! Some rodbuilders try to tout spine as the end all be all to rod stability, but through extensive testing, rodbuilders have found that spine matters, but not nearly as much as some people try to make you think it does! If you want to spine your rods, knock yourself out! Me, I'm going to build on the straightest axis and keep doing spiral wraps. If a customer requests that the rod be spined, fine, I will, but I will tell them the rod may not be straight.

    Here is something to think about. Say a blank has a hard spine at the top and a soft spine on the bottom, 180 degrees apart which is rare! The natural curve of the blank is with the soft spine on the bottom, hard on the top, which will give slightly better casting distance. This natural curve is one of the ways to find the spine (hard spine). According to you, the rod will be more stable. If the hard side is down, the fish will feel the "straight strength", but may not cast as well, and will be more squirrely in its handling because it is NOT how the blank wants to bend! So proper spining to YOU is to have the soft side down, which will give less power to the rod, but according to YOU, people want the "straight strength" of the rod, which would be hard side down. Which do they want???

    I've built rods off spine, and after they are all finished, the wraps will change the feel of the blank and make it feel like they are built on the spine.

    Well, I gotta get up early to go hunting tomorrow, so I will end it there for tonight!
     
  11. paul708

    paul708 Site Sponsor

    4,184
    197
    First off, caps lock being stuck on is considered yelling and rude.

    2nd off, I disagree with your post. I have built numerous rods and have played with building on spine/off spine and seeing the difference it makes, which in my testing has shown it makes very little difference and most people cannot tell the difference! What they can see is that the rod is kept much more stable while fighting a fish, reeling, etc, with the spiral wrap and they have less forearm and wrist fatigue after fighting the fish. I built a 40-100# Calstar 655XH tuna trolling rod off spine with a full set of All American rollers. No twist; the rollers are fairly low to the blank and the rod has enough stiffness to it to not make it twist, even when dealing with higher amounts of drag. I prefer to build on the straight axis so everything lines up the way it should. People notice straight, but are usually clueless on spine unless clued in by some "master rod builder" who has to educate his customers on how much a difference "spine" or "spline" makes on the rod and why they should buy from him and then teaches them how to "spine" every other rod in their arsenal to convince them they need to buy more of his rods. How many people noticed any "spine" issues with their rods until they were clued in by the rodbuilder?

    Rod twist has nothing to do with spine. Period. The spine changes on the blank depending on where you measure it. Try it some time with a blank, not a built rod! The guides, wraps, epoxy, etc all affect how the rod will bend and it's "spine". The composite blanks really show this because of the different materials meeting at different points on the blank. I've tried it with several blanks and the tip, mid and lower portion of the blank have the spine are different areas. So which do you use??? I've never felt a spinning rod twist in my hands from being off spine, have you??

    Twist on a rod is from gravity. The fish don't always fight nice and straight up and down. If the line moves out from the center of the blank (how far off it can handle w/o rolling depends on the guide height, AKA leverage the line has against the blank), the line will try to go to the bottom of the rod and will pull the guides that way. Lower guides will reduce this tendency to twist, as will stiffer rods. A tuna rod that barely bends won't twist much because it is the blank itself resisting the twisting! A limber jigging rod for tuna will often twist a good amount because the blank will move and flex easily. I've seen conventionals rods twist the guides 90 degrees to the side on tuna. Rod twist like that is not good for the blank and is worse on the blank than building off spine!

    Acid rods sometimes cost less, because less guides and smaller guides can be used to achieve correct static testing due to the fact that they do not have to keep the line off of the blank. I did some conventionals and I was able to use much lighter and smaller guides on the spiral wraps compared to the conventionals on the same blanks due to this, which makes the rod lighter, more sensitive and saves on component cost and labor.

    Spine has little to due with rod breakage. The vast majority of rod breakage while fishing has to do with "operator error", which few people like to admit. Fishing a rod way outside of the line/lure ratings, high sticking it, slamming it down into a rail, locking down the drag higher than the rod is designed to handle, a defect in the blank, etc cause more breakage than spine does! The majority of rods are broken in transit (car doors), so how does spine affect this? Like I said before, I've built rods off spine and on the straight axis of the blank, and I haven't had breakage problems. Static testing, guide placement, height, etc are all things I tweak so that they are right for each rod I build. Some issues of using guides that are too tall, not testing the guide placement against the amount of drag the rod can handle, etc can lead to problems that are unrelated to the spine, but many still try to blame the spine!

    Spine is a concept that has been examined by numerous people. Many builder still build on the spine; nothing wrong with that and it may give the rod a teeny bit of an advantage, but in reality most people wouldn't notice the difference. Most people, however, would notice a crooked rod and not want to buy it! Most of the spines on rods are not 180 degrees apart anyway, so if you build on one spine, it will be off on the other one. Also, with casting, you would have to cast in a near perfectly straight plane in line with the spine to reap the benefits of it. When casting bait casting reels, most turn the reel to one side, so the spine would be 90 degrees to the left or right for casting, and would be worse for fighting fish and cause twist according to you! So are those rods properly spined or not?? Most factories build on the straightest axis because people don't want to buy a crooked rod. Most of their breakage is from operator error, not from building off spine!

    It's funny how people mention spine with conventionals, but never mention it with spinning rods usually. Spinning rods are stable due to their guide setup (guides on the bottom, line in the bottom of the guide, gravity pulling the line down, etc), so there is no twist. On a conventional, the guides are on top and everyone assumes the twist is due to being off spine, never thinking that the guide placement may be causing it! I've seen rods built on spine twist under heavy loads and I have seen rods built off spine not twist.

    Like most things, there are two sides to every argument. I build on the straightest axis for the vast majority of rods I built because that is what customers want. A customer will not want a rod that is crooked but built on spine, and it sucks to have to ship blanks back and forth to get a perfectly straight one (it is very rare to have a perfectly straight blank!) and delay the customers order. Spining does not hurt the rod and may enhance it slightly, but for the vast majority of anglers out there, they will not feel the difference. Line twist is from gravity, not the spine! Some rodbuilders try to tout spine as the end all be all to rod stability, but through extensive testing, rodbuilders have found that spine matters, but not nearly as much as some people try to make you think it does! If you want to spine your rods, knock yourself out! Me, I'm going to build on the straightest axis and keep doing spiral wraps. If a customer requests that the rod be spined, fine, I will, but I will tell them the rod may not be straight.

    Here is something to think about. Say a blank has a hard spine at the top and a soft spine on the bottom, 180 degrees apart which is rare! The natural curve of the blank is with the soft spine on the bottom, hard on the top, which will give slightly better casting distance. This natural curve is one of the ways to find the spine (hard spine). According to you, the rod will be more stable. If the hard side is down, the fish will feel the "straight strength", but may not cast as well, and will be more squirrely in its handling because it is NOT how the blank wants to bend! So proper spining to YOU is to have the soft side down, which will give less power to the rod, but according to YOU, people want the "straight strength" of the rod, which would be hard side down. Which do they want???

    I've built rods off spine, and after they are all finished, the wraps will change the feel of the blank and make it feel like they are built on the spine.

    Well, I gotta get up early to go hunting tomorrow, so I will end it there for tonight!
    i am sure you an dante will have alot to debate...

    i do like what you say here...........................................
    Spine is a concept that has been examined by numerous people. Many builder still build on the spine; nothing wrong with that and it may give the rod a teeny bit of an advantage, but in reality most people wouldn't notice the difference. Most people, however, would notice a crooked rod and not want to buy it! Most of the spines on rods are not 180 degrees apart anyway, so if you build on one spine, it will be off on the other one. Also, with casting, you would have to cast in a near perfectly straight plane in line with the spine to reap the benefits of it. When casting bait casting reels, most turn the reel to one side, so the spine would be 90 degrees to the left or right for casting, and would be worse for fighting fish and cause twist according to you! So are those rods properly spined or not?? Most factories build on the straightest axis because people don't want to buy a crooked rod. Most of their breakage is from operator error, not from building off spine...............................................................

    you say about, spine giving a teeny advantage.
    and most factorys building on straight axis..

    i will give MY CLIENTS the teeny advantage..
    they want more than a factory rod.

    i dont ask my clients if i should build on spine..i DO iT, its just what i do.
    i Guess that being taught by some old RODCRAFTERS, we are set in our ways:D :D


    also a great point about rod twist. and gravity
    thats pretty much what i say in my Video.

    that why we do acid.
     
  12. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

    11,826
    1,415
    Dante,
    You saw all my jigging rods are acid wrappped and you make me look bad. :)
     
  13. red34

    red34 Guest

    I have never built an acid rod, but I can see the advantage. This used to be a cool test of how an acid rod will correct itself in a swiveling rod holder to "right" itself even with the weight of the reel on top.

    Acid Test - Spiral Wrapped Rod Casting Tests

    Maybe someone can find this test somewhere else or they'll fix it...
     
  14. Enoch

    Enoch Senior Member

    2,763
    27
    Advantage or not, acid wrap for me is preference.
    Building on spine is not. That is necessity.

    I agree with both opinions. I prefer spine wrap and if It's up to me for preference only, I'd go with acid wrap.


    I honestly believe a good rod builder can show you the difference and advantage of extras they suggest in a rod.
     
  15. Taz575

    Taz575 Senior Member

    1,334
    9
    Honestly, in the 70 or so rods I have built, I haven't noticed the spine really affecting anything to any appreciable degree that I can tell, whether its casting distance or stability. So I build on the straight axis. It's that simple. The stability issue is why I go with a spiral wrap, especially for jigging so the line doesn't loop around the tip top. I've been building for less than 2 years, so maybe as I go along, and learn more as I go, I will go back to spining rods. Just because a rod ISN'T built on the spine doesn't mean it is a bad rod, and just because a rod IS built on the spine, doesn't mean it is the best rod out there! There is information backing up both sides of the argument, so I will keep building on the straight and testing them out. Who knows, maybe next year I will be spining them again! That's what I love about rod building; its a continual learning process!
     
  16. DANTE25

    DANTE25 Senior Member

    311
    1
    WE ALL HAVE OUT OPINIONS AND WE ALL HAVE THAT RIGHT, ALL IM SAYING IS ALL OF MY RODS ARE BUILT ON THE SPLINE THE CORRECT WAY AND I HAVE NEVER IN MY LIFE HAD A ISSUE WITH THE ROD TWISTING ON ME AND I HAVE CAUGHT WELL OVER 100O TUNA, IM NOT TRYING TO START ANY ARGUMENTS IF YOU LIEK ACID WRAPS THEN GO FOR IT, THEY DO LOOK VERY NICE, AND WHO KNOWS MAYBE I WILL FISH ONE, ONE OF THESE DAYS, BUT ALL IM SAYING IS IN MY OPINION IT IS NOT NEEDED. I KNOW THERE ARE SOME GREAT ROD BUILDERS ON HERE WHO MAKE TERRFIC RODS SO IN NO WAY TO I MEAN TO OFFEND ANYONE.
    DANTE
     
  17. DANTE25

    DANTE25 Senior Member

    311
    1
    sorry for the caps i always have it on for work
     
  18. jig42na

    jig42na Spinal Rods

    786
    1
    i build on spine.
    i was taught that way.

    some say it doesnt matter. i have not bought into that web findings yet.

    we teach our students to build on spine.
    there are a few engineers in our club that have done test about spine. and effect, WE build on spine.


    conventional rods will always have the line trying to get to the bottom, which will cause some twist and torque..as more pressure is applied.
    even if built on spine.

    ACID Does keep the rod stable..and doesnt cost EXTRA

    so if you go acid you should not have to PAY MORE..

    I concur!!! But then again we learned from some of the same "Sen-Sa's" and hang with similar groups.
    I get picked on some of my personal builds as the logo on the blank will not look right, because I move the spine. Some of them won't be spined on the dominent spine. My Black Devil Label was spot on, but I went 180 with it so now my logo is upside down...i don't care.

    PAUL: Do you know anyone wanting to sell a bed extension for the rod lathe. I got a new table and have room now for another section. Thanks
     
  19. Capt Richie

    Capt Richie Site Sponsor

    2,894
    211
    When you spine a rod it jumps or rolls to its path of least resistance...Its were the blank want to lay under load..Why would you not want to build were the rod want to fish..

    I have built & fished hundereds of rods I found it makes a difference..More on lighter blank the say tuna stand-up blanks..So if you build & fish mostly tuna rods I can see you thinking its not so important...But it is.......

    GUSA United Composite make Duel Helix blanks ..One of the atvantages of these blanks is they reduce blank twist..Every blank wants to twist unless its built as a spinning rod...Why would they go through all the troubble to make these blanks if blank twist didnt matter..If you build on the spine you reduce blank twist.............. Like Paul said teeny advantages..I think a little more than tenny......
     
  20. DANTE25

    DANTE25 Senior Member

    311
    1
    agreed 100%

    When you spine a rod it jumps or rolls to its path of least resistance...Its were the blank want to lay under load..Why would you not want to build were the rod want to fish..

    I have built & fished hundereds of rods I found it makes a difference..More on lighter blank the say tuna stand-up blanks..So if you build & fish mostly tuna rods I can see you thinking its not so important...But it is.......

    GUSA United Composite make Duel Helix blanks ..One of the atvantages of these blanks is they reduce blank twist..Every blank wants to twist unless its built as a spinning rod...Why would they go through all the troubble to make these blanks if blank twist didnt matter..If you build on the spine you reduce blank twist.............. Like Paul said teeny advantages..I think a little more than tenny......