New Fin Nor spinning reel, 60# drag

Discussion in 'Tackle and Rigging' started by Minnow, Sep 30, 2006.

  1. Minnow

    Minnow Administrator

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  2. bellyup

    bellyup Member

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    I must say I like the size of the spool's posterior drag washers but the front stack looks awefully small. The price is right too, if it holds up. It doesn't have many bearings and the bail system looks a little weak.
     
  3. Minnow

    Minnow Administrator

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    The bail and anti reverse are my main concern.
    $170 buck for a reel that produce 60# of drag is a bargain LOL, I said that when Okuma first come out with their spinners.

    Who will be the first ginny pig?
     
  4. ALW

    ALW Senior Member

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    We tried out a prototype Zebco in the same price range on the TBB trip and it worked great. Looks like there will be some good lower cost spinning reels.
     
  5. Minnow

    Minnow Administrator

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    ALW,

    Do you have picture for that Zebco?
    How smooth is it? and how much drag that reel produce?

    thanks
     
  6. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    Fin Nor's were great reels in the old days, but they also spent a lot of down time in the repair shop. When Penn came out with the international series, Fin Nor lost its big game market share. Then, Shimano kicked Penns butt with the introduction of the tiagra series. After that, Accurate came into the big game market with a great product.

    This reel is marketed against the new penn spinfisher if you look at the comparison chart. For the money, it probably is good reel. But this and the new okuma vsystem spinners aren't designed to fight YFs. Most people on this board are YF fisherman and these reels might get you one or two before something breaks. But, there is a huge market for reels selling around 200 bucks and I'm sure they will sell a bunch of these new spinners, but not to me. I buy for the long term. I think it's better to buy the best from a established manufacter that will back it with parts and service in the future. I

    In ten years, if you pull out a stella, saltiga, or twinspin of today, it will still work fine and you will be able to get it serviced. I'm sure there will be major improvements in the next decade and that is what keeps the tackle industry into our wallets. Were all suckers when it comes to new products. We just keep buying and buying.
     
  7. Minnow

    Minnow Administrator

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    Well said MrBill.

    That's why I am planning to get Stella in near future.
    I don't want to waste my money on lower end reel then ended up spending more money to upgrade it. JMO
     
  8. jt2hunt

    jt2hunt Senior Member

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    tj, you know the stella is the way to go
     
  9. ALW

    ALW Senior Member

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    Minnow. The prototype Zebco spinner is very smooth. I measured 20 lbs max drag. Would fish it set to 15 lbs. I did not fish it. My son and Newman fished it. It's very not as heavy as the Penn 9500. Newman caught some big YF's with it. I will weigh it and get a picture soon.
     
  10. newman

    newman Senior Member

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    It is a larger size of an existing premium spinning reel in an 80 size and it was VERY SMOOTH! I landed a 60# YFT on the rig and the only thing I would have changed was the 6' rod it was mounted on! LOL! I wasn't getting the distance on my spinner (need to change the line) and could actually cast farther with the Boca 80 and 6' Quantam/Zebco 400 gram jigging rod.

    Considering the initial drag settings most anglers use for their popper setups is between 15#-22# I would not hesitate to buy one of these reels and mount it on a 7'-7'6" 50#-60# rod for poppers and swimbaits.
     
  11. Gdownunda

    Gdownunda Junior member

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    I have used the FINNOR spinning reel to catch Samsonfish (similar to yellowtail kingfish) and can assure you it's a very solid reel with a quality drag system. It makes the Penn look very clunky indeed.
     
  12. mcgolfer

    mcgolfer Guest

    gdownunda
    welcome to the site. i think your samsonfish resembles our gulf of mexico amberjacks. great fighting fish and tasty....rick
     
  13. Gdownunda

    Gdownunda Junior member

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    Thanks for the welcome mcgolfer. You're spot on, the samsonfish or sambos as we call them are very similar to amberjacks and they often school together. Where I fish is west of Rottnest Island off the coast of Fremantle. You may have heard of Fremantle because that is where the 1987 America's Cup was held. We fish in water varying in depth from 80-200m (about 650 feet). On the floor of the Ocean are sunken ships and sea containers, which have fallen off ocean going container ships. Bad news for them, great news for us. These objects attract Samson breeding aggregations over the summer attracting fish in the 100's of thousands. So dense are the fish schools that jigs are mostly taken on the drop, with fish varying in size from 40-100 pounds. The fishing is unbelievably good, but one gets bored from catching the same species over and over, hence I have come to this sight to learn about catching the yellowfin tuna which also frequent the waters. I look forward to learning from you guys.
     
  14. Deep_Sea_Gull

    Deep_Sea_Gull Lifetime Supporting Members

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    Welcome aboard Gdownunda.

    That's an impressive report for the Finnor reel. I'm sure that those sambos fight if they resemble the yellowtails and amberjacks.
     
  15. Gdownunda

    Gdownunda Junior member

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    Thanks for the welcome Deep Sea, the samsonfish (named after the mythical strongman) certainly do fight hard, but the great thing is, they are so common that first time fishermen are guaranteed to catch a fish anyone would be proud of. But we do make them earn it. It's a bit of a common gag on our boat to "initiate" newbies. Knowing that a big fish will strike within seconds, we get the first timer to do the first drop of the day and watch as they engage the the drag. Firstly, it's a look of complete shock as they are nearly pulled overboard, then it's a look of pain as they have just had their arms pulled out of their sockets. It is usually at this point that I like to ask if they are getting a bite. Then finally they give a look of delight as they have just caught the biggest fish of their life and can't wait to do another drop. It's great fun and a fantastic opportunity to test gear and refine fighting techniques. Bent arms don't last long against samsonfish.
     
  16. Ragman

    Ragman Moderator

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    Glad we have Aussie representation G!

    Feel free to ask any questions regarding YFTs!

    This fishery is just really getting discovered, but the Gulf of Mexico has always had people chasing snapper, grouper, king mackeral and other bottom dwellers, including the AJ.

    We also have a lot of Blackfin tuna, similar to Albacore.

    Welcome and I would love to chase Samsons! Will they come up for big topwater baits or mostly jigs?
     
  17. Gdownunda

    Gdownunda Junior member

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    Hi Ragman,

    Thanks for your kind offer of advice. One thing I've already noticed about American fishermen, is just how helpful you guys are (unlike many Aussie fisherman who guard their secrets) and it's a real credit to you guys. The area I fish is quite heavily fished by people trolling lures where they have limited success on what we call spanish mackeral (I think they are the same as your Kings), YFT, wahoo and blue, black and striped marlin. Whilst trolling, I've noticed vast numbers of bait balls about 100-150 ft from the surface and I intend to jig these schools this season (starting January). To be honest I don't know if I will have any success, but my theory is that surface lures (skirts) don't get down to where the fish are likely to be (around the bait balls). We also have FADs on the edge of the shelf that attract Mahi and ocassionally marlin and I bet there would be some massive bottom fish at the bases of them. So I'm yet to try my theories but I suspect we're about to open up a whole new fishery down here and I'm really excited about it. So if anyone can think of a tip they've used in a similar situation, I'd be grateful to hear it. Also if you guys are ever in Perth from December to February I'd be delighted to take you out.

    To answer your question, the samsons are breeding and do not take baits, but they do take jigs. We suspect the jig just annoys them. When you bring a fish to the the boat, it is followed up by other fish which would most likely attack a popper. Another technique which has been used (not by me) is to drop a jig without a hook. When the jig is brought to the surface, it brings fish with it and then they can be caught on saltwater fly. However, because the fish are usually in deep water and we wish to release the fish in the best possible condition, I use heavy gear (PE 8-10) to bring the fish in at at steady rate that minimises lactic acid build up, but does not burst the fish's swim bladder as well as providing a real work out for the angler.
     
  18. Dr Jeff

    Dr Jeff Member

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    I just pre-ordered a S95 for my NOV. Big E trip, from TD.they have 7 coming(hopefully)next week. 6 are sold.Hurry if you want one.
     
  19. paml

    paml Junior member

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    Hi I was ondering if you could give me the gps mark for the sea containers out from Rottnest. I have heard heaps about it but have been unable to get gps spot Thanks Pam Thanks for the welcome mcgolfer. You're spot on, the samsonfish or sambos as we call them are very similar to amberjacks and they often school together. Where I fish is west of Rottnest Island off the coast of Fremantle. You may have heard of Fremantle because that is where the 1987 America's Cup was held. We fish in water varying in depth from 80-200m (about 650 feet). On the floor of the Ocean are sunken ships and sea containers, which have fallen off ocean going container ships. Bad news for them, great news for us. These objects attract Samson breeding aggregations over the summer attracting fish in the 100's of thousands. So dense are the fish schools that jigs are mostly taken on the drop, with fish varying in size from 40-100 pounds. The fishing is unbelievably good, but one gets bored from catching the same species over and over, hence I have come to this sight to learn about catching the yellowfin tuna which also frequent the waters. I look forward to learning from you guys.