More killer whales in the Gulf

Discussion in '360 Degrees Lounge' started by gimmedeal, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. gimmedeal

    gimmedeal Senior Member

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  2. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    You better hope whatever they tradiationally feed on is doing well, or we may have some new residents in the GOM eating fresh sashimi.
     

  3. gimmedeal

    gimmedeal Senior Member

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    I know. When a pod of 6 were seen earlier this year off Texas, that didn't seem to be of much concern, but HUNDREDS? This area isn't all that far away and I'm curious if they might affect the fishing this winter in LA.
    I'd love to see em though, but I like my yellowfin tuna.
    Doug said that even blackfin were scarce on the trip. when Scott gets back we should hear about the fishin.

    Fred
     
  4. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    Adult orcas eat 500lbs of food each day. 100 orcas will eat 50,000lbs of tuna in a day. Let's say there were 200 orcas in that area. 100,000lbs of tuna would have wiped out Horn Mountain's fish. Onto greener pastures!
     
  5. Bellyups

    Bellyups Senior Member

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    I just came back from the 36 hour trip from Daulphin Island, AL. No hint of a YFT at the 3 deepwater rigs we visited! There was no surface action nor bites on chunks. Even BFT were rare. We trolled the rig for a hour and a half before chunking and barely caught a thing. There was a good pod of what we think were dolphin. These animals did not come close enough to the boat for me to positively ID.
     
  6. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    did you catch grouper, aj, anything else?
     
  7. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    did you catch grouper, aj, anything else?

    Yes limits of Aj's lots of grouper and scamp. We also caught more kings that any one needs too plus atleast 200 of the endangered red snapper.

    d-a
     
  8. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    lol...yeah im gonna write a report when i can think straight...but i caught a snapper on each drop.
     
  9. fonz

    fonz Member

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    Could a Killer Whale swim fast enough to catch Tuna? I wouldnt think so,,,
    Maybe they can??

    Maybe they are just scaring them away??
     
  10. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    They work together to surround a school of fish and have their way with them. There are several types of orcas, Offshore, Resident and Transient. Some orcas specialize in marine mammals and others don't. Atlantic orcas travel in large groups to work together while fishing . I just hope they move on, but, like gimmedeal, I would like to see them as well.
     
  11. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    Could a Killer Whale swim fast enough to catch Tuna? I wouldnt think so,,,
    Maybe they can??

    Maybe they are just scaring them away??

    they may not be as fast, but they're about 80xs more intelligent.
     
  12. kidflex

    kidflex Senior Member

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    they were definitely dolphins. i am currently having trouble with image shack, will post a report later
     
  13. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    they were definitely dolphins. i am currently having trouble with image shack, will post a report later

    Yea what we saw at the first floater was Dolphins. However the Killer Whales had been there 2 days before chasing tuna.

    d-a
     
  14. Riott

    Riott Guest

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    Actually they are fast... Killer whales are among the fastest swimming marine mammals. Killer whales are apex or top predators in the ocean. Known as "wolves of the sea", killer whales often hunt cooperatively in pods for food; working together to encircle and herd prey into a small area before attacking. When hunting a large whale, a pod of killer whales may attack the whale from several angles. They may also slide out onto sandbars or ice floes in pursuit of prey and are capable of hitting ice floes from below to knock prey into the water.
    Their food sources must be threaten for there to be so many pods in the gulf... either that or global warming is affecting the migration of their food sources.