Leader length

Discussion in 'Tackle and Rigging' started by Brokejeep, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. Brokejeep

    Brokejeep Senior Member

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    I am trying to get my new stuff ready to go and need to know how long the leader length needs to be and what type of line is best?
    I have a TLD 50 I am putting 80 power pro and a Cabo 80 and 60 with 65 power pro
     
  2. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    Broke

    On the chunking reel I use @ 25 feet of floro. On the popping rod I use 3-6 feet of 100 lb mono. On the daytime deep dropping I use @ 10 feet of 100-200 lb depending on if I am getting cut off. If I was using 1 reel for chunking and deep dropping I would have loop to loop connections so I could change out easily.

    You will have plenty of time to get your reels ready once you get on the boat.

    d-a
     

  3. Brokejeep

    Brokejeep Senior Member

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    Thanks for the help. I think I will pick up some things and then wait till I get on the boat. Is it much of a problem to get help once on the boat?
     
  4. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    No you will find that there will be lots of guys willing to help you out

    d-a
     
  5. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    As Doug says, you have plenty of time to change your terminal gear while under way and almost anyone will be willing to help you. I would not have believed it, had I not seen it with my own eyes, but Doug and TJ were even tying those God-awful Page Ranking knots using a bobbin in 6-8 foot seas. After receiving and distilling a lot of advice from folks on this board, I have come to pretty much the same conclusions as Doug--with a couple of exceptions:

    If using the same rig for deep drop and chunking/live flyers, I tie either a 7-turn surgeons loop (if line is hollow--I don't do the braided loop although that is definitely stronger), or a 40 turn Bimini if using solid line. Then I try to find out whether, after making bait, we will be deep dropping or heading straight out to the tuna grounds. Usually, you will stop for bottom fishing first. In that case, I just tie on a 300 or 400 pound ball-bearing snap swivel, using the offshore swivel knot. All of my bottom rigs (or anything the deckhands make up for us) start with a big barrel swivel, so you can easily attach any bottom rig from an 8-ounce snapper rig to a 6 pound cod-sinker rig. (If you ever decide to build your own rigs from scratch for really huge fish, scan MrBill's posts for the one in which he shows how he makes them.)

    After bottom fishing, when I really, really know for certain that we are headed out to the deep water, then I just cut off my loop, re-tie it, and slip on a pre-made, store-boughten wind-on leader (I have got to where I only bring 80 and 60 fluorocarbon.) and the hook goes on that. I have had good success with a 4 turn, non-improved clinch knot, although most will vote for the Palomar or one of the more exotic, newer knots. One thing--although I have limited offshore experience, I have been fishing for nearly 60 years, and I cannot impress upon you how right the folks are who stress that your knots should be very carefully tied, lubed with spit if in mono or fluoro, and drawn up and TESTED! So on to jigging:

    When I first started out asking the same excellent questions you have been, the general consensus was to use a windon leader of from 17 to 25 feet. I believe it was Rick (mcgolfer) who goes with a somewhat smaller leader, but since they sell them regularly in 25 foot lengths, I just settled on that. As you probably know, most people tie a good, round cross-sectioned solid ring onto their leader. (Here, I personally use the 4-turn non-improved clinch knot, though I am definitely in the minority on that) Then you attach a strong split ring to the solid, and your jig goes on that. If using assist hooks, you loop it (or them) to the solid ring.

    For casting, a lot of folks don't mess with fluoro, although some do. It is dark and then you pop or retrieve the lure, the leader is harder for the fish to see. The more accomplished caster you are, the better you can use a long leader. I am terrible, so I use only about two feet. Also, since I can cast with the knot outsided my rod tip (due to the short leader), I don't have to mess with the Page Ranking knot for smooth transition from braid to mono. I know that is the best method and someday I will no doubt have to learn it--but for now, I use a 40-60 turn Bimini, joined to the mono leader with an old-fashioned Albright knot--carefully, carefully tied.

    Russ