Jigs for Yellowfin on 76 Hour Trip

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by Uncle Russ, Apr 4, 2008.

  1. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    This question is aimed primarily at Kil, but advice from anyone would be appreciated. I (and I’m sure a few others who will be going on the 76 hour trip over July 4) could probably use some advice on what kind of jigs to take along.

    Kil, I re-read your post from last November on the gtpopping.com forum: jigging yellowfin - jigs and rigs

    I saw at on that thread that for yellow fin you recommend a slow stroke and shorter jigs in the 6 inch to 8 inch range from 250 – 250 grams in weight. I intend to do almost all my jigging with the OTI 300 gram rod or possibly occasionally the Nirai with the Twinspin.

    As to particular jigs, based on your advice, I am thinking about the following:

    The OTI Jaeger jig and the Butterfly regular jig. Am I on the right track with those as opposed to the longer jigs?

    Also, I would assume from what you said on the other board that the best strategy would be to drop the jig down about 100 – 200 feet and then use the slow jigging method. Thanks very much.

    Russ
     
  2. LEXPRO

    LEXPRO Senior Member

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    On the TBB 06 trip i noticed some of the larger blacks and small yellows caught deeper on very long heavy jigs. There was a strong current..
     

  3. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    You never know about those tuna. They eat just like us. Sometimes we want a big steak, a greasy Mexican dinner, Italian food, Oriental food, hamburger,....etc. They normally hit a jig that gives out a signal like the bait they are feeding on at the time.

    The biggest YF I ever saw hit a jig, hit a little 4 oz diamond jig that was coated with a luminous rubber coating. That jig was also being cranked in as fast as possible with a jerk motion. That same jig caught three YF's over 100 pounds that night. The tuna were also only at a 75 foot depth when they hit.

    I truly believe that a glow jig or at least a partial glow jig works best if fishing at depths of 150 feet or more. Don't be afraid to send it down 300 to 500 feet. From what I've seen the tuna at these great depths like a very slow retrieve if any retrieve at all. Just bouncing it a little or lifting your rod will do the trick.

    Remember, tuna go deep to cool off. When their body temperature gets high, they slowly sound downward to cool off. They aren't as active at deep depths as they are nice and cool. Hell, I don't want to move when I'm in front of a nice air conditioner combined with a ceiling fan on full blast.

    They do this about four times in a twenty-four hour period. They hunt the whole water column up and down durning their depth cycle. That's why sometimes you see a top water bite only last for an hour. They get hot slowly retrieve back down to cool off. It you see a topwater bite that goes on for hours, it's because the water temperature is comfortable for them up top. That's one reason why the GOM has the hottest top water bite in late Oct to late Dec.

    Current plays a big part in jig selection. That's a big factor. If the tuna are deep with a heavy current, big out the 500gr jigs and hope they get down.
    On those days or nights with no or little current a smaller jig in 150-200gr works great. I'm tired of typing, so that's my two cents for this Friday afternoon.:)
     
  4. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Wow. Pretty detailed info, MrBill. I had heard some of that but not all--puts a lot of it in perspective. Thanks.

    Russ
     
  5. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Russ,
    I am thinking what tackles and what jigging tecniques to recommend at Canyon Runner fishing seminar in Newport, RI as many jig fishermen in New England are heavily influenced by Shimano Butterfly jigging system and by charter boats guides in Cape Cod Bay who are specialized in light tackles.
    You can catch a tuna on a kayak with a great fun, but you can not say a kayak is the best boat to fish tuna. :)

    The problem is tuna can be caught by many different ways of jigging. Anyone who caught tuna only by one specific method believes the method he uses is the best way to catch tuna. Tuna jigging is evolving.
    My way of jigiging is not for everybody and it can not be the best way.

    Using 200 - 300 g jig doesn't mean you got to use 200 - 300 g rod. :)
    I prefer 400g and 500g jigging rod for tuna.
    90 percent of my tuna catches on jigs were made in depth between 80 ft - 150 ft.
     
  6. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    There were time I couldn't lower my jigs past 50 ft. :)

    [​IMG]
     
  7. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    thats a nice problem to have!
     
  8. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Thanks everyone. Looking forward to meeting you guys. I think I will bring the OTI 300 and 600 gram rods and the Nirai spinner (500g).

    Russ
     
  9. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    Russ,
    Don't forget to pack some poppers. :D
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Ragman

    Ragman Moderator

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    Hey Uncle Russ!

    Also remember the sub-surface swimming jigs. You've got the Shibuki and the Baby Runboh and the Tuna Pen (sinking model) worked for me when the topwater bite just wasn't there.

    The pink color happened to work best on my last trip, but the dark blue for some reason didn't get as much YFT attention as the pink.

    I think you can get them at PLAT.
     
  11. STx Fisherman

    STx Fisherman Senior Member

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    Mr. Bill....

    That looks like a popper parade....lol.

    Thanks for the insight on how the yft slow down at 300 feet or deeper because of the colder temperature. That is an excellent explanation as to why they hit slower jig movement.