Jigging - Conventional vs Spinning

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by HUNTER II, Jan 29, 2008.

  1. HUNTER II

    HUNTER II Guest

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    I'm sold on the virtues of jigging and since I don't have an unlimited budget I'm trying to sort out whether I should buy a spinning based setup or a conventional based setup. Both seem to have their +'s & -'s. I am leaning towards spinning because I think that the rig is more versatile as it can be used to jig and pop and for me it seems easier to implement the jigging technique. I fish out of the Gloucester Massachsetts area and will be targeting school Bluefin Tuna in the 50 - 150 lb range. The setup that I am looking hard at is a 5'8" Trevala F XXH spinning rod with a Spheros SP18000FB. Your thoughts on the setups and gear being considered are requested.
     
  2. dt300mm

    dt300mm Junior member

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    I'm sold on the virtues of jigging and since I don't have an unlimited budget I'm trying to sort out whether I should buy a spinning based setup or a conventional based setup. Both seem to have their +'s & -'s. I am leaning towards spinning because I think that the rig is more versatile as it can be used to jig and pop and for me it seems easier to implement the jigging technique. I fish out of the Gloucester Massachsetts area and will be targeting school Bluefin Tuna in the 50 - 150 lb range. The setup that I am looking hard at is a 5'8" Trevala F XXH spinning rod with a Spheros SP18000FB. Your thoughts on the setups and gear being considered are requested.
    I have that rod, the 5'8" Trevala F XXH spinning rod, and can't imagine getting a 150lb. tuna up with it. I used it on one trip for Yellowfin. I had it bent into the reel seat trying to get a 50lb ish yellowfin's head turned. My 2 cents - get the OTI rod. No experience with the Shimano spinner.
     

  3. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    from what i've seen from the trevalla rods - i agree, they're like noodles.
     
  4. shanker

    shanker Senior Member

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    I had that same idea, to jig and pop with the same rig, well, after using my spinning rig setup for a season, ive now dedicated it to a popping rig and got a dedicated conventional Jigging righ with an Avet JX and Calstar 700H rod..

    I absolutely LOVE my spinning rig, but its not as comforatable to jig with as my conventional setup, its more clumsy....the ultimate jigging rig would be a star drag reel rather than a lever drag though....
     
  5. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    I still prefer conventional based setup for jigging tuna. But everybody has different taste and opinion.
    5'8" Trevala F XXH and Spheros Sp1800FB might be good for 50 lbs school bluefin, but not for 100-150 lbs. If you fish in Massachusetts, you never know what you catch next as big bluefin sometimes mix with school bluefin and those big fish probably can destroy your light setups.
    You eventually save money by investing adequate quality rods and reels from the start.
     
  6. lite-liner

    lite-liner troll enforcement Staff Member

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    Just my own opinion, but the Trevalla series has no business w/ any tuna over 40#. Here's a pic of Andrew Whitman on a larger model tuna w/ an XXH version, I beleive. lasted about 5 min's.:eek:

    the OTI 5',6"/ 400g or 600g jigger in the spinning version is prob. the best rod you're gonna find under $300
    Islander's in Galveston has the SeaMajic "dragonfly" series, which works awesome, & inexpensive, but I'm spoiled on the OTI foregrip.
    As far as spin vs. conv.? that's a personal preference thing, but I will say it seems I can get and hold a better "rhythm" while jigging
    w/ spinning tackle. I fish both ways, leaning towards conv. as the tackle requirements get heavier. mostly cause i'm too cheap to buy a Stella!:rolleyes:
    .tight lines
    -Brian
     

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  7. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    Just my own opinion, but the Trevalla series has no business w/ any tuna over 40#. Here's a pic of Andrew Whitman on a larger model tuna w/ an XXH version, I beleive. lasted about 5 min's.:eek:

    the OTI 5',6"/ 400g or 600g jigger in the spinning version is prob. the best rod you're gonna find under $300
    Islander's in Galveston has the SeaMajic "dragonfly" series, which works awesome, & inexpensive, but I'm spoiled on the OTI foregrip.
    As far as spin vs. conv.? that's a personal preference thing, but I will say it seems I can get and hold a better "rhythm" while jigging
    w/ spinning tackle. I fish both ways, leaning towards conv. as the tackle requirements get heavier. mostly cause i'm too cheap to buy a Stella!:rolleyes:
    .tight lines
    -Brian

    LOL - that was hilarious watching that.

    shimano has great marketing to be able to sell those rods in such volume. I like my rods to have a sensitive tip - but at least have some damn backbone.
     
  8. Sea Crappie

    Sea Crappie Senior Member

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    I don't figure you'll be too happy popping w/ that trevala (even if ya like it for jigging). Popping rods really should start at 7ft, and if you're doing daytime popping for bluefin, I'd bump it up to at least 7.5ft.

    You can jig with a long rod, but you can't pop with a short one. So to me, if you want one rig to do everything, a 700 or 800 series calstar, or one of OTI's 80lb popping rods.

    And really, trevalas are made in a pasta shop, steer clear.
     
  9. gman

    gman Senior Member

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    I personally prefer spinning for both jigging and popping. Up in the Northeast distance is everything if your chasing pods of bluefin tuna so I would say a minimum popping rod of 7' but prefer 8'. Its not like party boat casting where the fish are all around the boat, your chasing the pods with a CC and trying not to spook them

    I've said it before, the trevala rods are great inshore rods but not suitable for any tuna over the 50
     
  10. Fishhead56

    Fishhead56 Senior Member

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    Hyper Man with 70-80 lb YFT on a Pasta Rod.
    He had the Energy but really couldn't transfer
    it to the fish.
    This forums archives are full of similiar shots.

    No back bone = no lift.


    FYI.
    Also just noticed 360tackle Leap Year 30% web special.
    That would be big $$$ savings on a Great rod.
     

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  11. fathom

    fathom Lifetime Supporting Members

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    The advantage of conventional is to have 2 speed reel. You will apreciate it when you hook a larger tuna.

    If you can only afford one setup a power gear spinner with 7' rod with 80lb. rating will cast popper or jig.
     
  12. HUNTER II

    HUNTER II Guest

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    I'm definetly hearing to stay a way from the Trevalas. Just for my edification are you guys talking about the older style trevala (TC4) or the new style TC4F - I went to a seminar this weekend and the Shimano rep swore that the new TC4F woould not noodle like the old TC4. The first 2.5 ' noodles and then the last 3 +' are supposed to be stiff as a ____ . The theory is that the rod moves the fishes end of the lever back closer to the fisherman which moves the advantage away from the tip. The noodling part is important for creating the correct jig action.
    I have been building rods for years and built a spinner based on a 7' Calstar Grafite 700H. Last summer I cast into a school of what we thought were 75 - 90 lb BFT's. As soon as my lure hit the water my buddy said he thought I might be sorry - 1.5 hrs later I had a 125 lb fish with in 50 ft of the boat but I couldn't finish it because the blank rolled up on its self. It was rough and I was tired so I palmed the 14000 series Spheros (which worked like a charm) and broke the fish off. I checked the drag and the scale read 18 lbs. I took 6" of the end and gave up some casting distance, but significantly stiffened the rod. It will now lift a 25 lb weight which I am using as a standard. As a popping rod it will be fine, but I think it now is too stiff to be an effective jigging rod. Tore my achilles right after that so I was done for the season.
     
  13. DeepBlueGulf

    DeepBlueGulf Senior Member

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    The Trevalas do not have any lifting power, but if you use a 2-speed conventional reel, you can lay the foregrip on the rail, and point the rod at the fish and reel him in using low gear. Not easy, and not fast, but better than trying to lift the fish with a noodle rod. In my opinion that goes for all the conventional rods that start bottoming out, you've got to point and reel.

    Spinners you cannot do that with, and if you have a high gear ratio, well, then heaven help you! I haven't even fished it, but I've already thought about swapping my new Sustain for a Twinpower, just to get the lower gear.

    DBG
     
  14. Sea Crappie

    Sea Crappie Senior Member

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    Maybe i'm missing something here, but how is it your rod lifts more weight now that you've trimmed the tip? The deflection profile of the 700H remains the same, you've just made the rod "feel" stiffer. Another way of putting it is the lock-up point is no further from your hands than before the trimming, meaning the length of your effective lever on the fish remains unchanged (at least w/ the rod bottomed out).
     
  15. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Once you get brainwashed by Shimano's propaganda and their personnel, there is no cure but to use their products until you realize by yourself after buying and using them. :)
     
  16. HUNTER II

    HUNTER II Guest

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    Sea Crappie - Not sure where you are coming from - the CALSTAR SPECS for this rod are 700H - 7' - 30-80 - Ex-Fast - J/L 40-50 lb. With an extra fast action most if not all of the rod bend is in the upper 25% of the rod. By removing the tip section where most of the flexing is occuring the rod blank as I see it must get stiffer.
     
  17. HUNTER II

    HUNTER II Guest

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    WOW - you guys don't like Shimano stuff at all - the year before last I caught 30 school bluefin to 100 lbs all on various combinations of Shimano Reels with zero issues. In fact our primary spinning reel was a 6500 Baitrunner and our trolling reels were TLD 25's. In 2007 we got 10 before I tore my achilles all of which were taken on Shimano Reels and some Shimano Beastmaster Rods. I love the old Beastmaster stuff and the Baitrunner, Spheros, and TLD stuff have served me well.
     
  18. thenewkid

    thenewkid Senior Member

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    Ahh i wouldnt say that.... its quite the opposite. most of this board hates the trevalas only when they are used beyond the capabilities. like glenn aka gman said they are really good inshore rods. other than that? this bored loves shimano overall like the stella, tiagra, tld's, spheros, and all those will find great praise from most on this board.
     
  19. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    I don't have a problem with most of shimano's gear - though in general I prefer Daiwa. I just think they really did a great job (as kilsong said) at spinning their propaganda about their glorified trout rod (read: trevala). I'd use them if I was using 20lb test - but not 80.
     
  20. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    2/3 of my reels I currrently use are Shimano's from fluke to tuna.