Jig rods/bait rods- Length?

Discussion in 'Rods and Rod Blanks' started by Kevin Bogan, Oct 1, 2009.

  1. Kevin Bogan

    Kevin Bogan Banned

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    I posted a thread about rod tapers and thought there were a lot of good responses. I did mention length but little was mentioned, those that did feel free to augment your positions.

    Any best all purpose length?

    conventional?

    Spin?

    Weight class versus length?
    Will a 7' rod with the same taper/power than a 6' boat a fish faster?
    Does a longer rod absorb "Shock" as well?
    Here's a thought; boats that have 'brackets' for outboards. It appears that the distance could range from 36", or more likely 48" or more from where you can stand on the stern, to the outboard side of the outboard engine. Obviously making it difficult to clear the engines if the fish runs in that direction. How much more difficult is it to fish this setup versus the older style 'notched sterns, or inboard boats?
     
  2. gman

    gman Senior Member

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    Length: Personally I only use Spin rods that range from 5'-5'2" for jigging jerk crank. I feel this will give you adequate length for both backbone and tip sensitivity to work jigs. I think 4'8" is a tad bit too short and 5'8 is too long for me. So I have settled in at 5'-5'2"

    Time & Absorbing shock: To be honest I believe its the anglers skill that boats a fish faster and not the rod. I know people who can land huge fish on 8'8" rods and people who struggle with the same class fish with 6' rods. Now with that said I believe a more parabolic rod will absorb shock better than a stiffer rod that just bends at the tip. its more about action than length IMHO

    Regarding clearing engines, I have dunked my gear in the water many times to clear them but when i hook up I normally always try to fight the fish from the bow and will direct captain as we go as I feel I have the best chance to land fish in that manner
     

  3. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    i think a lot depends on your style of jigging. for traditional style jigging, i like a longer rod to get more jig action and movement. for fast, jerk/crank style i prefer shorter rods. a longer rod can also be put on a rail if need be on a party boat which is a plus. longer rods can also get the line away from the hulls of party boats easier than a shorter rod can. but a parabolic rod is very nice once you're hooked up and takes a lot of strain off the angler.

    ive got both, and its not to say you cannot jig however you want with either rod, but certain advantages are inherent with either design. as with anything in fishing theres never one right answer and there will always be compromises to be had :)
     
  4. mad mike

    mad mike Junior member

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    It seems to me when it all boils down around here "Cape May nj" area people use mainly diamond jigs for the bft. which to me is yoo yooing,I'm not talking about the people who are really into jigging and jap style, talking as a whole.Do they run out and buy a cool short rod for this?or have a longer rod which you could cast or pitch and get more use out of it?I'm not a pro just my thoughts?by the way wish I had the cash to buy mike garones seeker yes I'm a tackle whore
     
  5. paul708

    paul708 Site Sponsor

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    alot of my clients in jersey are buying some shorter rods to use along with the longer rods that they have been using for years catching these fish.
    shorter rods just seem to be promoted more this year.

    some guys like longer rods and some prefer shorter.
    but if they are only going to but one rod.
    i try to see if they have anything alredy available to use.
    then they only have to buy one rod either long or short.

    and if they are Ho's...hell yeah, i got 2 for ya:D :D

    most poeple as a whole..have a rod they can jig with.
    it may not be what is "promoted" as a Jigging rod.
    but it will catch fish using a jig.

    i tell the guys that cant afford the $$$ stuff..Just go do it with what you have. JIG, JIG ,JIG
    you will catch fish.
     
  6. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    The rod length is by necessity. For conventional East Coast jigging, they need longer rod to give actiion to jigs by moving rods up and down and cast farther.
    For Japanese jigging, the rods have to be short to crank fast. You can do it with 8' rod to crank fast, but it is much harder.
    Most Japanese jigging rods are from 5' to 5'8".
    Japanese jigging rods are normally shorter for targeting big fish or using heavy jigs while lighter jigging rods tend to be longer.
    Though not many fishermen pay much attention, some Japanese jigging rod makers make a little longer rods for sliding long jigs. It is not difficult to understand you need a little longer rod to work long jigs to slider better.
    But still, they are under 6'.
    Many East Coast jig fishermen is now in confusion whether they go with traditional long rod or Japanese style short rod. :)

    Years ago, when shorter tuna rods became popular on Long Range Boats, the rods became as short as 4'. But they found counter-effective if the rods are too short as most guys fish on big party boats. For the same reason, i don't think Japanese jigging rods get shorter than 5' for the same reason though some might prefer shorter than 5' rods.
     
  7. Eastern Tackle

    Eastern Tackle Senior Member

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    In NC I do a lot of different jigging styles in a day. Most times on boats we are limited to 2-3 rods because of room. Thats why I use rods mostly from 5'9'-5'11. I can do all styles of jigging with this length.

    Most days for jigging I can bring one light rod (200g range) and one heavy (400g range) both around 5'10 and do everything I want to do in a day with only the two. If we can bring 3, I will fill in the gap with a 300g that could be used either way if I had a failure for some reason.
     
  8. Nev

    Nev Senior Member

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    Going back to the original question, will a 6' rod bring a fish to the boat quicker than a 7' one.
    If the two rods have used the same design i.e. material,taper rate and real seat position the simple answer is yes.
    We test blanks in three areas before they are Field tested,
    1- Dead lift capabilities to find the area of the blank that will delaminate under full load (adjust pattern)
    2- Point load testing (for those that have bad technique:( )
    3 - Load ratio (at 45deg)

    40kg dead lift
    20kg point load
    These two are straight forward

    The third one explains why some rods feel better to fight a fish with than others.
    A good rod can have a load ratio as low as 2.5, a poorly designed one at 4.5

    weight=8kg
    scales=20kg pretty good, If the scales read 28kg its not going to break your back, 36kg its a dog ask for you money back.


    A long rod with a good design can have a better load ratio than a short rod.



    If you measure apples for apples a shorter rod will win this test.
    Basically as the rod shortens you can increase the drag without the force increasing on the angler. But as you all know with all the different variables that go with fishing, 4'8" in most situations is not practical.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. paul708

    paul708 Site Sponsor

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    i like that bucket pic
     
  10. Nev

    Nev Senior Member

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    It makes it easy to add weight, I wouldnt normally do that without a face shield but the new rods lift that without too much trouble.
     
  11. Nev

    Nev Senior Member

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    It makes it easy to add weight, I wouldnt normally do that without a face shield but the new rods lift that without too much trouble.
     
  12. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Nev, thanks for the info. some might make the best available jigging blanks in statistics by testing, but it doesn't mean the blanks are the best for jigging rods as everyone has different feeling. Good fishermen can land quickly than beginners even with poor road ratio rods. I saw many different experinced fishermen fight differntly adpted by their physics and fighting techniques.
    Some don't bother using stiffer rods and some prefer soft rods.
    In the end, the feeling of each fisherman matters which can not be measured by machines.
     
  13. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    i like that bucket pic

    Thats how I break all my rods

    d-a
     
  14. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    Nev,
    I like your lifting device.
    Have you ever (just for the heck of it) left a rod in your device bent in half for weekend. I just wonder if you did that, would the rod ever be completely straight after being under strain for a few days?
     
  15. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Thats how I break all my rods

    d-a
    Doug,
    I organized my all rods today and I had 5 rods broken. All are brand new custom rods and I broke all of them with my hands while testing flex. :p
     
  16. paul708

    paul708 Site Sponsor

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    Thats how I break all my rods

    d-a
    yeah, thats a pretty popular way to do it:D
     
  17. Nev

    Nev Senior Member

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    Nev, thanks for the info. some might make the best available jigging blanks in statistics by testing, but it doesn't mean the blanks are the best for jigging rods as everyone has different feeling. Good fishermen can land quickly than beginners even with poor road ratio rods. I saw many different experinced fishermen fight differntly adpted by their physics and fighting techniques.
    Some don't bother using stiffer rods and some prefer soft rods.
    In the end, the feeling of each fisherman matters which can not be measured by machines.


    Kil, Im sure you guys read the bit where I said thats what we do before they are field tested.
    I answered Kevins question to try explain why length effects the feel of a rod not to get into an argument with people who so far have only offered him reasons based on personal opinions.
     
  18. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Kil, Im sure you guys read the bit where I said thats what we do before they are field tested.
    I answered Kevins question to try explain why length effects the feel of a rod not to get into an argument with people who so far have only offered him reasons based on personal opinions.
    Nev, I appologize if my comment offended you. I have been in search of better jigging rods and I conclude that eventually it come down to each fishermen's feeling which no machine can measure. I shouldn't comment it because it is nothing to do with length of jigging rods. I just posted without thinking when I saw the machine. :)
     
  19. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    Doug,
    I organized my all rods today and I had 5 rods broken. All are brand new custom rods and I broke all of them with my hands while testing flex. :p

    Kil that was a lot of $$$ spent on just testing:eek:

    d-a
     
  20. Nev

    Nev Senior Member

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    Kil, I design rods from fly rods to game rods and i dont have enough fingers and toes to count the number of blanks or rods that I have broken in the last 6mths let alone the last ten years.
    I have no intention of naming the company I work for or the companies we supply as i cant be bothered with the crap that comes with that.
    I like fishing with my JM rod and we buy rods from the same factory so I'm not likely to give you any grief.
     
  21. Nev

    Nev Senior Member

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    Nev,
    I like your lifting device.
    Have you ever (just for the heck of it) left a rod in your device bent in half for weekend. I just wonder if you did that, would the rod ever be completely straight after being under strain for a few days?

    Rod blanks when left in that position take what is called a set.
    It varies depending on the material to the resin system used.
    When we get our prepreg cloth it comes at different resin contents (35-41%) and different volatile contents.
    The volatile content is the one that can give problems. Suppliers alter this depending on the seasons as temperature variations alters the tack properties.
    If they get it a little too high it effects the curing process. Even if you double cure the blank it will take a set with very little effort. This is why we get our material from either Japan,UK,US, or Korea. We have tried cloth from China but it has so far ended in tears for this reason.

    An easy way to explain this is it is a similar problem for the guys who build rods. If you put too much hardener in the epoxy then you end up with something that wont harden properly and goes soft in the sun.