jig color matter?

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by sharpshooter, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Senior Member

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    i purchased a Do-It Flutter jig mold and have been casting my own jigs. i have been happy with the outcome, but havent found a finish that holds up well. the epoxy based paints are a PITA and spray paint chips pretty easily. i ve been thinking of leaving them alone and fishing them straight outta the mold. they re pretty close to a chrome diamond jig in color. if they tarnish too much i can always throw them back in the pot and cast another. what do you guys think? color matter? by the way, im using bullets recovered from my shooting range and my cost is 32 cents a jig (16 for harness and 16 for 3d eyes) thanks
     
  2. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    try sticking some prism tape on them. I use it on a ton of different jigs from molds that I carve out of wood. Paint a coat of contact cement on the jig where you want the tape to stay. let it dry, cut the tape to shape and stick it on. The contact cement really helps keep this stuff on.I've had incredible luck with the jigs I make.
     

  3. gman

    gman Senior Member

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    This has been a huge debate on this and every site. My feeling is the bites are a reactionary bite based on movement but with that said there are some colors such as glow and pink that seem to work better for certain fish. There is scientific data that shows how color is affected at depth of water.

    Denis B has written some informational posts regarding this. Ive seen some colors outfish others and ive seen jigs with zero paint on them catch when shiny jigs didnt
     
  4. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    sometimes pink jigs work....sometimes blue jigs work....sometimes green jigs work. IMO its tough to predict the perfect color. obviously if you know that the fish are feeding on say, mackerel, having a mackerel colored lure cant be a bad idea. but you never know. im not discounting anything glenn or denis said......just saying that im bringing every color under the sun on the trip this weekend and hoping for the best :)
     
  5. John_Madison CT

    John_Madison CT Senior Member

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    I'm starting to believe that color doesn't matter. I do a lot of jigging offshore and inshore.

    I think it's a reactionary strike as well. The movement is something unusual and "baitfish" like, so they hit it.

    We jig in the canyons where for all intensive purposes the water is dark. I don't think they can see anything, but rather sense movement with their sensory receptors.

    Perhaps something that generates light, like a glow jig is different. Afterall, Squid will frequently light up.
     
  6. Dave Nowlin

    Dave Nowlin Senior Member

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    I wonder what would happen if you use several bas coats of aluminum paint with an overspray of black along the back and then simply apply a top coat of clear epoxy. It seems I remember a friend who made homemade bass lures using aluminum paint on them and they worked pretty good.
     
  7. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    Until one of us can be a fish for a day we will just never officially know. :)
     
  8. Castmaster

    Castmaster Senior Member

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  9. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    Here's some halfbeak imitations that I made and that I put some tape on. they are a little crude ,but the fish don't seem to mind:) I've caught a ton of tuna on these. I don't know what to think about color. Sometimes I don't think it matters, then I'll see a day where 1 color out fishes another 7-8 to 1. These "beak" imitations fish like crazy with blue on them .I tried green, Looks hot to me, I couldn't get a bite on it:confused:
    Anyhow,I think this tape works mainly because it's bright, flashy,and they can see it well. I have a bunch of other style jigs I use this stuf on From trout lures to big jigs for codfishing ,it works well on them all.
    Try some .I think you'll like it.
     

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  10. chf1949

    chf1949 Senior Member

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  11. twentythreefive

    twentythreefive Senior Member

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    I really think that color doesn't matter near as much as presentation, but i like a nice flashy jig for most of my jigging.

    I also have been using homemade jigs all year and the best way that i have found so far to finish them is to get some holographic/ prisim tape. I cut two pieces of the tape then coat the sticky sides of them with epoxy. I then sandwich the jig between the two piece of tape and place it in a vacuum seal bag. I vacuum seal it which presses the tape tight to the jig and let dry. Once dry i cut the excess material off then add eye's and give it a final clear coat of epoxy. These jigs have been holding up better than any of the factory jigs and they are as shinny as can be.
     
  12. jdl

    jdl Member

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    In addition to the effect of water depth on color, it is believed that pelagics may see certain colors (i.e. blue) better than others.

    In any case, the more and more I fish with artificials, the more I am convinced that most of the time color is more important to the angler than the fish. Whatever jig you think looks the best you will likely use more often and thus catch more fish.
     
  13. Boston Tangler

    Boston Tangler Site Sponsor

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    Great thread thanks for the good info. I have a new jig in development right now and its funny we where all discussing colors this past week so this is very timely post! I think I'm going to do light pink with a blue back and glow belly. That seems to be one of the best patterns and based on the other manufacturers jigs I sell, these are the colors that are asked for time and time again. PINK or Pink with Glow. But I do like the blue backs too
     
  14. Capt. Dom

    Capt. Dom Site Sponsor

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    In addition to the effect of water depth on color, it is believed that pelagics may see certain colors (i.e. blue) better than others.

    In any case, the more and more I fish with artificials, the more I am convinced that most of the time color is more important to the angler than the fish. Whatever jig you think looks the best you will likely use more often and thus catch more fish.


    Good lures catch more fisherman than fish.....;)

    Spot on, as I also dont think fish see colors in the same way we do. Presentation and shape of the jig mean more....that being said, I change colors and shapes like crazy, as I do think the shading and profile based on light conditions and the natural forage changes the way the jig is seen in the water and whether the fish will strike it or not as a result.
     
  15. jig42na

    jig42na Spinal Rods

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    All good points. To me the best jig color is the color of jig tied on. We caught all species on all colors and some many with bare lead color. I do think that certain species will adapt to what you are using and will back off the lure. You then change colors and bites pick back up.
    Personally I feel water color and light conditions are more important to what color to use. As long as there is good shine, then I am happy.
    I focus more on size, shape, and retrieve of the jig, same thing for poppers.
     
  16. Albiemanmike

    Albiemanmike Senior Member

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    Try getting some powder paint and mixing some of that mylar flash tape as well. The powder paint is relatively easy to apply. I use it on smaller smiling bill type jigs and just heat up the jig head with a torch and then dip the head into the paint it melts instantly and dries very quickly to an extememly hard finish. You can also pre-heat the jigs and then sprinkle on the paint however you want to do it the stuff is very durable.
     
  17. spineyman

    spineyman Senior Member

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    Here's some halfbeak imitations that I made and that I put some tape on. they are a little crude ,but the fish don't seem to mind:) I've caught a ton of tuna on these. I don't know what to think about color. Sometimes I don't think it matters, then I'll see a day where 1 color out fishes another 7-8 to 1. These "beak" imitations fish like crazy with blue on them .I tried green, Looks hot to me, I couldn't get a bite on it:confused:
    Anyhow,I think this tape works mainly because it's bright, flashy,and they can see it well. I have a bunch of other style jigs I use this stuf on From trout lures to big jigs for codfishing ,it works well on them all.
    Try some .I think you'll like it.

    Those are some pretty good looking jigs. Where in the world do you get that reflective tape?
     
  18. Eastern Tackle

    Eastern Tackle Senior Member

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    I always seem to be the rebel, but I feel that jig color means a lot. Two examples come to mind.

    1. I had jigged the 302 wreck itself for 30 minutes. SW corner, Ne corner and all around the whole thing without anything, even though I could see the jacks there. I had been using a potroast color. I switch to a yellow glow and the jig didn't make it to the bottom on the first drop before getting slammed. A color change was all it took.

    2. We went to Hatteras in Feb. We all started out with different colors as usual to determine the hot color of the day (as its always different). The guys were getting good bites on flatside and katanas in potroast. But I had stuck with a pink for two hours without a bite. Changed to potroast and hooked a nice bluefin on the first drop on the way down.

    I am of the opinion that color makes a huge difference based on my experience.
     
  19. Swell Rider

    Swell Rider Member

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    Well color= marketing in my book. Make it look sexy and give it a name and it will sell. Myself and Travis(jig42na) have put this to the test many times, we've fished home made jigs with no color, just plain lead out of the mold and caught plenty of fish, when the bite slows change up the presentation of the jig or the stlye of jig and see what happens, it might surprise you that it's more about presentation and technique.
     
  20. DenisB

    DenisB Senior Member

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    The first reference link provided in this thread is excellent
    The best reference material I have found on colour for lures is "What Fish See" by Colin Kageyama ( an optothalmologist with a number of additional qualifications in a range of fields of optometry and a passion for steelhead & salmon )
    The second link referenced in this thread is less valuable ( colour wheel stuff )
    a) the terms used are confusing............we would refer to contrasting colours where the author refers to "complementary" colours etc.
    b) the reference to fish primarily seeing in "shades" (of grey) is not supported by current science ( see Kageyama's work & references)

    Another poster refers to fish having preference for reception of blue colours.
    - this is true of marlin. The tests show this to be so & the assumption is that the primary prey of marlin are pelagic species with primarily blue tones, and genetic evolution has enhanced an advantage in perception of blue tones by marlin
    - this is not true of other species generally, which have a more diverse range of prey & prey colours.... incl tunas ( Kageyama presents evidence that in general ,colour perception by most fish is pretty similar to humans.)
    for both humans and fish, colour transmission in sea water varies with distance & depth as sea water filters out different colours at different rates.
    Two important things to understand are :-
    colour transmission with respect to distance and
    that most colours are not pure primary colours but a mix of several shades of prime colours, so as one colour is filtered out & moves into its grey scale equivalent ( the object does not turn invisible) , another prime colour in the mix becomes dominant
    A good example is blood in sea water its red up close, but at distance it turns green ( just about any diver will confirm this effect )
    This is because the Haemoglobin in the blood is red & is dominant, but another component in blood is green & at distance under water the red is filtered out and turns a light grey, the green colour of the other component in the blood becomes dominant & green is seen as green at a greater distance under water than red.
    Get the idea about what might happen with your favorite colour underwater ???????
    Tip 1: a colour scan of a sample at your local paint store will identify the proportion of primary colours & what they are..............He He.
    Tip 2: don't take a lure in , you might not get a free test, paint a small piece of wood & take that in & tell them you are thinking of painting a wall, can they match the colour in a gloss , the tell them you want to think about it can they give you the colour mix formula to come back with if you decide to go ahead. Take it home & think about the colour tones involved in the mix, 4 to 5 different prime colours are often involved.
    Interesting stuff.
    What would be really interesting would be if someone on this board was in the paint trade & could get some really fresh sardines , pilchards, different mackerel types & squid scaned when really fresh & post the colour formulae for us all to have a look at.

    In order of significance from a hot bite to a picky bite the "triggers" for a strike are generally as follows:-
    - anything that moves
    - general shape of the prey the fish is focused on.
    - contrast by the lure against the background ( note : this varies depending whether the fish is seeing the lure contrasted against the surface. sideways in the water column, or down against the bottom colour ( sand, weed, rock etc etc.) or just a deep dark abyss)
    - swimming action ( this and the one above are pretty equal )
    - general contrast colour pattern of the preferred prey species
    - colour in the lure that does not change differently to what the fish expects from experience of its prey as the fish gets closer to the lure.
    ( see the implications of the 1st link in the thread or more usefully Kageyama's examples & references )
    ie
    if that good looking woman you are interested in suddenly turned green up close..............you might lose interest pretty quick too.

    - specific strike triggers of colour patterns of particular prey ( ie patterns & marks in juveniles of the size of the lure , that are different to larger adults ...........a lot of species have them ).
    - ' Match the hatch ' , size, shape, colour , & swimming action.

    I strongly recommend Kageyama's book to anyone painting lures.
    Fish species identification books with colour plates of real juveniles & adults are very useful too.

    another post refers to lure colours catching more fishermen than fish.
    In general ..........absolutely true, no doubt that lures hanging in the rack in shops catch more fishermen than fish............but not usually once you have read something like Kageyama's book.

    Now in reference to the original question.
    yes most "home cast' lures are shiny out of the mold & tarnish quickly in the water.
    Grey is a good general colour, it's nondescript & can represent an image of anything to a fish, but without shine it relies on contrast against its background to attract fish, a bit of shine attracts fish from a greater distance.
    - chroming & prism tape both work
    - the simplest solution I have found in 30+ yrs of lure making is to coat fresh castings with leftover rod epoxy after rod building or old epoxy you dont trust on your next rod build.( I never waste rod epoxy mixes ).
    - Tarnished lures can be shined with different grades of wet&dry paper & then epoxied ( they dont really need to be 'polished' as such )
    - specific epoxy purchases for this job are :-
    - rod epoxy for small production runs
    - or Envirotech Lite - Gloss Finish Epoxy for larger production runs.( its cheaper and a bit harder )
    - where I want a simple back colour for the lure I just use a blue,or black, or green, or red sharpie (or similar) after the epoxy has set hard...........lasts a very long time.

    Ohh....... I've got air brushes & a multitude of colours & spray patterns, and spray urethanes etc etc, but a simple contrasting baitfish colour on the back of a lure is quick, easy, and lasting with a Sharpie or similar on the clear Epoxy coat.( never before epoxying as it bleeds everywhere as soon as the epoxy hits it...........always after epoxy has set hard ).

    Care with other clear coats as their compounds & thinners can instantly tarnish the lure surface .

    Hope that helps the original question & clarifies some of the other issues that arose in the thread.