Insight on rods...

Discussion in 'Rods and Rod Blanks' started by Van Wildonher, May 7, 2009.

  1. Van Wildonher

    Van Wildonher Member

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    Can anybody tell me why spinning rods have bigger guides than conventional? Exactly what happens when a spinning reel is used on a conventional rod? By the looks of it I'd say casting distance is reduced, are there any other disadvantages?
     
  2. spineyman

    spineyman Senior Member

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    The reason the guides on a spinning rod have to be bigger is because the way the line comes off the reel instead of a conventional. The bigger the better the coeffecient of drag is. Less restrictions.
     

  3. spineyman

    spineyman Senior Member

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    Newtons first law. An object ( line ) stays in motion unless acted upon by an outside force ( guides ).
     
  4. jiggawhat

    jiggawhat Senior Member

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    MAn that george guy is pretty smart!The rod could also break because the spine is going in the opposite direction.it will work for a while if you had to do it but put a good fish on and youll lose a rod and the fish!Why do that to yourself?
     
  5. jureal

    jureal Senior Member

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    Jigawhat???? Huh????
     
  6. txseadog

    txseadog Moderator

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    The rod could also break because the spine is going in the opposite direction.it will work....

    This may have been a real issue in the past but I think it is more of a urban legend than anything else now. The guides on most factory rods are placed on the straightest axis of the blank with little or no regard given to the effective spine.
     
  7. jiggawhat

    jiggawhat Senior Member

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  8. Van Wildonher

    Van Wildonher Member

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    So because it creates more drag, casting distance is reduced. What if they aren't being cast?
     
  9. Albiemanmike

    Albiemanmike Senior Member

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    So because it creates more drag, casting distance is reduced. What if they aren't being cast?

    There is no reason to not use whatever you want to use. If you are not going to cast the rod with a spinner then use it. I once used an ultra light trout spinning rod for flyfishing in tight quarters and it worked beautiful.
     
  10. Rule of thumb is to use a stripper guide (1st guide) 1/2 the diameter of the reel spool. The big guide theory is over rated and just adds un-needed weight to the blank. Using the smallest guide you can with out having line slap the blank during a cast is what it translates to. Granted there are alot of factors, for smaller stripper guides you gotta move it farther up the blank to get a good placement. With the new concept theory or thought, the quicker you decrease guides size to get the line almost flowing in a straight line the better. Again many factors, but the basics of it. With casting rods that first guide is just to small, usually a 16 or 20 and the big coils are getting choked too fast. However if you use braid you should still be able to technically use a spinner on a conventional set up, just won't get the best performance out of it. But in a pinch it will cast (not as far) and it will reel in fish.

    And spine, over rated. Straight axis is the way to go. Have seen plenty of spines that fall on a nasty curve of the blank where the tip goes left or right. If spine was such a big thing regarding breakage, I am pretty sure blank companies would require builders to use the spine to keep warranty.
     
  11. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    Hi guys ,new here. love the site. I Am fairly active on a few others. anyhow, I have a 7 ft, all star conventional, (from back when allstar rods were smokin') that I use with a fin-nor ofs950 for bluefin. I've taken a bunch of fish on this rig,some over 100. works fine. not that I'd really recommend this,But,as someone mentioned, would be fine in a pinch. or just till I can afford the spinning rod I really want.
     
  12. jig

    jig Senior Member

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    My first 'big game' spinning rod was made from a seven foot allstar 30-50# conventional rod. I found one out of the many in the store that had the spline 180 degrees off from the guides (when used as conventional). I had the stripper and second guides moved up to replace the 3rd and fourth, and then had larger spinning stripper and 2nd guides put in their place. The rod was on sale for $20, the modifications cost about $50. So now I had a spinner I was very happy with for around $70. Although I now use a heavier class rod with my Spheros 14000 (the allstar just did not have enough backbone for big YFT), I still fish it with a spheros 8000 with 50# spectra. It is still one of my favorites.
     
  13. gman

    gman Senior Member

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    or just till I can afford the spinning rod I really want.

    Honestly, all bullshit aside about products and gear. I say buy less and fish more. Its very easy to get wrapped up in buying all the top end stuff but in the end it does you no good if you cant fish it.

    My mantra now is to spend less on lures and gear and spend more on actual trips I want to go on. If your a good angler you will catch on whatever you are using
     
  14. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

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    Honestly, all bullshit aside about products and gear. I say buy less and fish more. Its very easy to get wrapped up in buying all the top end stuff but in the end it does you no good if you cant fish it.

    My mantra now is to spend less on lures and gear and spend more on actual trips I want to go on. If your a good angler you will catch on whatever you are using
    Couldn't agree more, it's nice to have nice things but sometimes (especially for guys like me) it's better to get what you need to get on the water. I still think money needs to be spent in the right areas are your trip could be a waste but I'm a big fan of using what works. Some folks call this bottomfeeding, I call it being efficient and economical. Either way at the end of the day it's all about having all that yummie fish in the cooler! :)
     
  15. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    Honestly, all bullshit aside about products and gear. I say buy less and fish more. Its very easy to get wrapped up in buying all the top end stuff but in the end it does you no good if you cant fish it.

    My mantra now is to spend less on lures and gear and spend more on actual trips I want to go on. If your a good angler you will catch on whatever you are using

    I agree,But I can and will fish it. I live a mile from a ramp that puts me under 20 miles to Stellwagen.I'm probably on the bank 30 or more times a year(between groundfishing and chasing charlie) I've been thinking about the "right" Spinning rod for about 10 years now.(I think it's time.lol) believe it or not, I was probably the first(at least one of the first) nuts to be chasing tuna with light gear on and around Stellwagen.I've probably caught somewehere in the hundreds of tuna on spinning gear.There have been many days that I've landed 7-10 fish in a day. There have been years when I had to go no further than 3 miles from shore to hook up with charlie. I actually saw a school of 80lb class fish busting mackeral,this year, while on anchor ,groundfishing, 3-4 miles from shore. Anyhow, an oti 5 or 600g rod would get PLENTY of use in these hands,and I think it will be money well spent.
     
  16. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    if you are looking for a popping rod, the tuna sniper 60-80lb rod would be a good fit. for a jigging rod, it depends what drag you're planning to use. 20-22lbs then the 400g is good, 24+ then 600g
     
  17. Van Wildonher

    Van Wildonher Member

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    Just an update, I have been using the rod since around the time I posted this, and it works fine for what I need. (I don't cast with it)
     
  18. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    So because it creates more drag, casting distance is reduced. What if they aren't being cast?

    The Trevala rods are an example of that, they don't cast that well but work for straight up and down jigging.