I need expertise on which reel to use

Discussion in 'Rods and Rod Blanks' started by kaibab200, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. kaibab200

    kaibab200 Junior member

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    I have a dilema, everyyear I head up to Canada to fish for monster white King salmon running up from the ocean, with the current rigs (Calcutta baitcast with 50 pound braided and 30 lb mono leader) we are having a very difficult time landing fish over 40 lbs, not always due to break off, but they will strip an entire reel. What happens is that in the day and a half you will have 20-30 hook-ups on big kings, 8 or so are monsters, the biggest I have seen brought in is 70lbs, but it was an area were there was very little current. If they are in the 25 -35 lb range we can usually get them in, but when they get bigger than that (around 8 last year) they use the current and end up over powering the rod/reel system and free themselves. The technique does not allow affective use of a spincast reel, so I need a bait cast type model something that will cast well accross the river, hold larger line and really add some drag. Because of the strength of the current It probably doubles the weight of the fish. The canadians and locals have the same problem, any ideas?

    T
     
  2. Reaux

    Reaux Junior member

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    Try a Newell 229 or maybe the wider 235. These are popular reels used in jigging 3 - 6 oz. weights for striped bass in the Cape Cod Canal. The current is strong there, up to almost five knots; but, nevertheless, stripers of fifty or more pounds are taken there ever year.

    Newells are built like a tank. All stainless steel inside. It's worth it to pay the extra $50 or so to get a P-series reel, with the aluminum spool and metal handle. The composite handle on the S-series has been known to break.

    They have no brakes, though. You need to train your thumb. Also they are non level wind so you'll have to train both thumbs. The left to lay the line down evenly on retrieve, and the right to control the spool (back lash control) during the cast.

    Reaux
     

  3. Formula4Fish

    Formula4Fish Senior Member

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    You mighty consider an Accurate Boss Magnum (probably the 665) or an Avet Hoo-X.
     
  4. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    In Kenai, they normally use 200 yards of 20 - 30 lbs lines for king salmon.
    I saw some guys use 40 lbs lines for king salmon in Salmon River, NY, but I feel 40 lbs line is too much. There are tons of conventional reels for this application.
     
  5. ALW

    ALW Senior Member

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    My wife and I fished the Kenai with Guide Monty Roberts of Allalaska Outdooors. We used 30lb line on a Shamono Calcutta reel. I caught a 75 lb King and my wife caught a 65 lb king. Another friend on the boat caught a 60lb +. We had no problems, Monty did a good job moving the boat with the fish. We were fishing upper part of Kenai instead of the herd that was fishing downstream. Down stream you could walk from boat to boat almost. Every trip I made fishing with Monty was outstanding.
     
  6. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Not saying you are wrong, because the closest I ever came to a king salmon was when opening my freezer :) and I admit to a spinning bias, but I'm not sure what you mean by the current's making it unsuitable for spinning gear. I fish for 30-40 pound redfish in the current of Texas ship channels, and while they are probably not a match for the bigger salmon, I frequently get bit by big Jack Crevalle, sometimes in current of 10 knots, by my estimation. And I have handled these effectively on Penn 8500s, certainly not a premium reel. I have not hooked any yet on the Twinspins or Stellas, but my go-to rig as it now stands--is going to be the SR20 with 90 pound braid, on the OTI 7 foot spinner. I cannot imagine that that would not be a solution for your situation. And, while some people can cast further with tweaked Newells, if you are like me, you can get much further out with the spinner. Or, if you want a heavier rig, go with the Twinspin 30 or Stella 20,000, 80 pound line, and the OTI 7 1/2 foot 50 pound rig.

    Or do you mean that twist would be a problem. Don't know about King Salmon, but a good BB swivel might help there. I'm just suggesting that you save the money you would invest in 6 or 7 Newells, and buy a Twinspin. :D

    Russ
     
  7. kaibab200

    kaibab200 Junior member

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    I appreciate the comments and help. Here some additional information you are asking about. With a baitcast type model you can let line out with the current, the strikes or so finicky, the fish basically open their mouth and squash the eggs, not really striking, but killing rival salmon eggs. So the control of the line as it goes out with this type of reel, works much better than a spincast. I have fished with a spincast and so have my friends, we get 5-6 to 1 hookups with a baitcast vs. a spincast. That is our experience. Oh the luxury of having a boat and being able to maneuver over and with the fish, then it would be a different story. The kenai is a much different river. The current is swift enough that the only boats that go on this river are white water rafts and Kayaks. Now there are deep pools and that is where you work the fish into to have success, but the big salmon will run out of the pools and catch the fast water and it is over. 2 years ago the water levels were very low, so the salmon were only in the deep pools, that is when we landed the 70 lber. I want something like a grouper rig that you can cast. Where if they make a strong run, you can can really lock down and pull back.

    K






    Not saying you are wrong, because the closest I ever came to a king salmon was when opening my freezer :) and I admit to a spinning bias, but I'm not sure what you mean by the current's making it unsuitable for spinning gear. I fish for 30-40 pound redfish in the current of Texas ship channels, and while they are probably not a match for the bigger




    salmon, I frequently get bit by big Jack Crevalle, sometimes in current of 10 knots, by my estimation. And I have handled these effectively on Penn 8500s, certainly not a premium reel. I have not hooked any yet on the Twinspins or Stellas, but my go-to rig as it now stands--is going to be the SR20 with 90 pound braid, on the OTI 7 foot spinner. I cannot imagine that that would not be a solution for your situation. And, while some people can cast further with tweaked Newells, if you are like me, you can get much further out with the spinner. Or, if you want a heavier rig, go with the Twinspin 30 or Stella 20,000, 80 pound line, and the OTI 7 1/2 foot 50 pound rig.

    Or do you mean that twist would be a problem. Don't know about King Salmon, but a good BB swivel might help there. I'm just suggesting that you save the money you would invest in 6 or 7 Newells, and buy a Twinspin. :D

    Russ
     
  8. Uncle Russ

    Uncle Russ Senior Member

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    Ahhh. Understood. High hookup ratios are our friend. I told you I had never been salmon fishing. Now you know--I never have been salmon fishing! :D

    Russ
     
  9. FirstNationRods

    FirstNationRods Guest

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    Last year I spent the summer in Larsen Bay. I used a variety of gear. I bought a Saltist 40 in July and love it. I put Daiwa's Boat Braid ..the 5 color Dyneema stuff. The 100lb as a diameter of 10lb super mono. I added a top shot of 30lb P-Line. It worked well. For Halibut I used the same line but the topshot was 100lb and the reel was a two speed Daiwa. I built the rods. One was a vintage Sabre , I think the blank was a 655 and the other a Shakespeare blank .

    I liked the top shot over the Super Braid as it gave me tons of line and I never did spool it.

    Thanks..Richard
     

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  10. kaibab200

    kaibab200 Junior member

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    I have been looking into the saltist, how smooth is the casting with the saltist? If you have a well trained thumb will it get it out there a ways?
     
  11. FirstNationRods

    FirstNationRods Guest

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    It has a number of adjustments.Good thumb controal helps though.It comes in two models a high-speed and a more normal 4.something. I bought the Saltist 40 regular speed for the added torque. It has worked well as a jigging reel to. 100lb halibut were no problem last summer.

    Richard