360 Tuna Fishers Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Junior member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all.
This is my first post to 360Tuna.
I went November 09 tuna trip at Galveston Party Boat and caught 25 BFT.
All BFT go to my house and I was looking for better way to clean tuna.
I found way to clean and worked for me very well, I want share this with who caught lots of BFT.
check below link.

Akio.


:)
 

·
Member
Joined
·
78 Posts
Those fish mongers at the Awase fish market know what they are doing. I overlook Awase bay from my house and go to that market quite frequently. My son loves to watch them cut up big tuna.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
I usually knock the head off like in the video, and then quarter it out with the skin on. This way, you can lay the skin side down on the ice in the cooler and not have the ice directly on the meat. On smaller bluefin or smaller tuna in general, I get my big Deba out and just fillet them, going thru the small horizontal bones, then either leave it in fillets, or break it down to loins. Pretty quick to do!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
Great video, holy sharp knives. That guy that was holding it upside down and running it down the bone, amazing. I wonder what the most popular brand of fillet knife is. I've always been known to use Dexter Russells, but those don't even compare to what was in that video.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,622 Posts
newbie question; I assume you can't do that on the boat so how do you bleed them before putting them on ice.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
You can do it on a boat! I loined out a 60" BFT in the Cape this year while still on the boat, had to keep the carcass and head intact. Sucked doing it that way, but came out nice!

For knives, the real Japanese knives have Dexters beat hands down! They aren't cheap, but they work incredibly well. The edges they take and hold are amazing and really make filleting easy. Dexters work OK, but you have to keep touching them up. The Japanese stuff stays sharper, longer. Dexter now has a line out there that looks like the Japanese Knives, but doesn't perform nearly as well. The Deba, for example, is supposed to be a thick, heavy knife to go thru the fish bones and stuff, with a concave back and single edge. You sharpen the bevel of the edge, then flip over and polish the back side of the knife, where it only touches the very edge and the very spine of the knife and you get a wicked edge. The Dexters are ground on one side, but the back side isn't concave and you have to raise up the back to put an edge on. The edge the Dexter japanese imitations isn't anywhere as clean as a real Japanese knife. Plus, on the Deba's, the weight is not there. Maybe 1/8" thick vs the over 1/4" thick of my real Deba.

The knives they use in the video are most likely Carbon steel knives; they hold the edge longer than most stainless steels and take a very wicked edge that is easier to touch up than stainless. They look more like traditional butchers knives than the traditional Japanese knives like you see on the fish market videos. I've tried Henkels, Wustoff, Dexter, etc and none of them compare to the Japanese stuff I have!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
Taz,

you must have different regs, it's illegal here to separate the meat from carcass before landing the catch.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
We asked and were informed that as long as we keep the whole carcass in 1 piece, and just loined out the tuna, we were fine. We didn't have a cooler big enough to fit the tuna whole in. We had the carcass and everything still on the boat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,803 Posts
Taz

where do you buy Japanese fillet knives ? The only
ones I've seen are the Yanagiba, takes 6 months to make
and starts at $900 - $1500 (ox horn/brass etc ... )

You are correct about steel quality, stainless is overrated
but is required for salt environment & sanitation requirements

some of the better steel I've owned and used are
D2 Tool Steel, VG-10, S-30. Shun Michel Bras is the
best set of Japanese steel I have (VG-10 )

another feature I've found important in a fillet knife
is the upswept shape of the blade, type = Cimeter

Forschner/Victoninox/Dexter/F Dick/ etc.. make this style
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
Welcome to Foodie Forums - Intelligent Discussion for Serious Cooks has a great cutlery forum, as does Knifeforums.com homepage.

For buying the knives themselves:
JapaneseChefsKnife.Com Top Page Japanese Knife,Japanese Kitchen Knife,Japanese Cutlery,Japanese Chef's Knives.Com
The Epicurean Edge: Japanese and European professional chefs knives
www.japanwoodworker.com

I usually got most of my stuff thru these guys.

My deba is carbon and shows it after being on the salt a few times! I used to work with S30V when it first came out (I used to make custom knives) and it was a PITA to work!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,622 Posts
ditto that; you can't do that in Florida either

So back to my question; what's the correct way to bleed one?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,803 Posts
So back to my question; what's the correct way to bleed one?

cut the throat all the way to the spine, yank the gills out

on the Big E they just poke it on both sides about 2 inches
away from the base of pec fins
 

·
Junior member
Joined
·
19 Posts
Handling of BFT

Part 1.Bleedng the fish

First we will pull the fish up high on the transom by it's tail rope and make a cut approximately 2" wide and 1" deep behind one or both pectoral fins which taps into major arteries. We used to also make a bleed cut on the tail but found it wasn't necessary and cut too deeply, makes real problems. Then towing the fish by it's tail, we will rake it's gills with a gaff or more preferably a harpoon iron while towing it. This should fairly quickly bleed out the fish. Once the blood flow slows down and the fish does not appear to have much movement, we haul it onto the deck by the tail rope and take some very quick pictures with the anglers then immediately start to dress it. Leaving the fish on the deck in the sun for even 15-20 minutes can really shorten the refrigerated shelf life of tuna steaks. High Core temperature of the fish is your enemy and you want to get it cooled down as quickly as possible.

Part 2. Dressing the fish
With the fish on the deck, we use a basic short handsaw (Stanley 15" FatMax, $16 @ Home Depot) to cut off the head of the fish. I would suggest that if you are new to this you do this in a few cuts versus just lopping the head off which could case you to lose good meat. See the drawing below. Next you want to carefully cut in a circle around the fishes anus so you can pull the main intestine out of the body and carefully cut it free. This allows you to remove from the head cavity, the stomach, organs, etc… in one shot. After you get all these parts out we wash out the cavity with a high volume, salt water wash down. You can also scrub the cavity with a stiff round boat brush with a 2' handle to get rid of any coagulated blood. Don't forget to cut open the stomach to see what the fish was feeding on before throwing it overboard. You can also remove fins, except one pectoral fin and the tail for easier handling.

Part 3. Icing and Storing the fish
We cram the body cavity with as much crushed ice as we, can carefully packing it in. Next we place the carcass in a bed of ice in a 4' iceytek cooler and pack it as tightly as we can with ice around it and fill the cooler. The heat from the fish will quickly melt out the ice around it, so packing the cooler with lots of ice to the brim helps to not have warm air pockets around the fish. We then put the cooler in our below deck fish hold or in our big, on deck ice box to help keep it cold and to keep the sun off of it. For those of you in smaller boats consider putting it under the T top. Another great alternative is an insulated bag. We recently bought a really good one through the First Light Anglers shop for Giants. I believe the bag is made by "Boone" and is a Monster Double Tuna Bag. If you want to know more, just call the First Light shop. We used the bag this past weekend when a scientist on the Karen Lynn was sampling other boat's catch for a study for the Large Pelagics lab and the bag was incredible in keeping ice and cooling down multiple fish before we gave them back.

This all may seem a bit obsessive and extreme, but try it once and you will be amazed at the quality of the fish you are grilling that night! After you have done this procedure a few times it is easy and goes very quickly; for our crew it is almost automatic.

You can visit our blog on the Karen Lynn Charters site to see the whole write up with pictures included.

Tight Lines!

Jim
Karen Lynn Charters
Fishing Charters in Gloucester Massachusetts: Tuna, Striped Bass, Shark, Cod and Haddock, Offshore
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,703 Posts
cool thanks; that will make a nice mess to clean up on my boat. LOL

This is how they do it on the Scat Cat after sticking them. Goes in an ice slurry bucket. Watch out for the splashing!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
513 Posts
Handling of BFT
Part 3. Icing and Storing the fish
We cram the body cavity with as much crushed ice as we, can carefully packing it in. Next we place the carcass in a bed of ice in a 4' iceytek cooler and pack it as tightly as we can with ice around it and fill the cooler. The heat from the fish will quickly melt out the ice around it, so packing the cooler with lots of ice to the brim helps to not have warm air pockets around the fish. [/url]

I wonder if adding water (even salt water) to the ice would eliminate the air pocket problem on melting, and create a 32 degree or lower (with salt) ice bath. We were trained to use ice baths rather than ice to cool things in science class...

-CV, M.S. in Zoology
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top