Help Me Choose a Butterfly Jig Mold

Discussion in 'Lure Building' started by red34, Dec 14, 2008.

  1. red34

    red34 Guest

    I need to start pouring my own vertical jigs due to their cost and the fact that I like making my own tackle when I’m landlocked here in Dallas.

    I’ve found the following molds:

    Yann Mold from DB Angling Supplies - Makes 1ea 200, 300 and 400g lures
    £70.00 - comes out to about $125 US with s&h
    [​IMG]
    DB Angling Supplies - selling Yann Mould nationwide

    Yellow Reef Mold from DB Angling Supplies – Makes 1ea 300, 400, 500, and 750g lures
    £70.00 - comes out to about $125 US with s&h
    [​IMG]
    DB Angling Supplies - selling Yellow Reef Mould nationwide

    Flutter Lure FRS- 2-79 from Do-It Molds – Makes 1ea 7 and 9oz at once
    $74 plus s&h
    [​IMG]
    Do-it Molds: Flutter Lure

    It looks like most of the jigs sold are between 7 and 14 oz so I’m having trouble deciding which one to go with. Advice??
     
  2. feeder

    feeder Senior Member

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    Either look like they would work, but depends on which style you're accustomed to as well. I think the first and second are front weighted and the third is center weighted so they will probably drop (flutter) in different ways.

    One thing I noticed when tried to make lures is that using pure lead makes for a softer jig which can be bent by big fish.
     

  3. red34

    red34 Guest

    i have "made" my lead from car wheel weights, which i have read have additives that make them more rigid than plain lead. i say made because it is a process of removing steel forms, and cleaning all the gunk and crap off the lead in the melting pot.

    i also figure i can somewhat shape and form the lures with a hammer for flattening and a lead file for shapes to make different flutter designs
     
  4. red34

    red34 Guest

  5. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    When you buy all molds for every jigs, it cost much more than jigs. :)
    While there are a few reliable jigs I use, I constantly test new jigs.
    When you make jigs from the limited molds, you tend to fish with jigs you made.
    When you have a slip for your boat, you fish around your slip. That is why I got rid of my boat as I want to fish many different areas for different species. :)
     
  6. red34

    red34 Guest

    When you buy all molds for every jigs, it cost much more than jigs. :)
    While there are a few reliable jigs I use, I constantly test new jigs.
    When you make jigs from the limited molds, you tend to fish with jigs you made.
    When you have a slip for your boat, you fish around your slip. That is why I got rid of my boat as I want to fish many different areas for different species. :)

    i see your point, but i lost about $100 worth of jigs on a very short trip and i've read stories of losses that were A LOT worse. the purchase of 1 or 2 molds $75 or so each will pay for themselves after 2 or 3 molding sessions, not to mention the satisfaction of catching fish on my own creation.

    as far as trying new styles, i figured shaping a few of them differently should at least give me a little variation.
     
  7. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    you've got to know what is around you when dropping jigs.

    for bottom or structure fishing i wont drop anything expensive down since theres a good chance you're going to lose it. this being said - use the cheapest jig that gets the best results :)
     
  8. feeder

    feeder Senior Member

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    Yes the wheel weight lead is a little harder and should do fine.

    There's something satisfying about catching a fish with something you made (rod, lure, jig, etc) that you can't compare with anything store bought. That being said I still believe in buying jigs for the most part. Mostly for convenience and as Kil pointed out, it's fun to experiment with new stuff when given the opportunity.
     
  9. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Im in with you on the molds & lead . My last trip cost me about $300 just on jigs:mad: including some Smiths I went to sleep for a while when my buddy ( grenee ) was feeding jigs to sharks.
    You got a very nice friend. :)
    Even though I am selling jigs, I don't recommend to use exotic, expensive jigs for bottom fishing or king mackerel/barracuda/wahoo are around as I don't want to use them myself. Even I lost 15 jigs a day for two days when I fished Mid Night Lumps out of Venice, LA, it cost me only $130-150.
     
  10. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    once i brought this guy on board last weekend....the expensive lures went back in the box ;)

    View attachment 4980
     

    Attached Files:

  11. red34

    red34 Guest

    ok let me rephrase my question...

    if you only had 2 or 3 sizes of jigs for the GOM, what size would they be?
     
  12. lordhell

    lordhell Moderator

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    uhmm , I rather say . Dont bring your expensive jigs if you are planning to fish :
    1.-Bottom or structure
    2.-with Grenees
    3.-Take a nap

    Question how would you know for certain whats around you if you dont drop jigs?:confused: .
    Dont think the fish finder have that capability yet ? identifiying fish:D


    Maybe drop live bait and see if there are any marauding kings or barracudas around? If not, then bust out the lures! :D
     
  13. wchook1

    wchook1 Guest

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    The Mold for 7 to 9 oz Jigs. By far the most productive jig weights.
     
  14. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    ok let me rephrase my question...

    if you only had 2 or 3 sizes of jigs for the GOM, what size would they be?

    7, 10, 14 oz....if i HAD to pick only 3 sizes. i only say this because from my experience id rather have a jig that is a bit too heavy for the current than a jig too light that won't get to the desired depth.

    In speed jigs i normally carry jigs between 150-500g

    in hammered diamond jigs/metal sardines i have from 6-12oz. i normally like to start with 8 or 10oz.
     
  15. SkeeterRonnie

    SkeeterRonnie Senior Member

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    The Mold for 7 to 9 oz Jigs. By far the most productive jig weights.
    that would be my choice too.
     
  16. Augs

    Augs Member

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    Yo Red, I just talked with one of the other professors I work with, and it looks like One of the sculpture professors has the semester off, so I am helping in the foundry when I want. I give sculpting lessons, and I get access to bronze, steel, and mold facilities. I am also thinking of setting up a small foundry at the warehouse. let me know how the pouring goes and keep in touch.
     
  17. hog

    hog Member

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    Hello Red,


    Since there has been 2 years since your original post about pouring your own verticle jigs back in 2008, I was wondering if you could share about your verticle jig making experiences since? Pros-Cons, success's-failures etc...

    I too, am going to do the same thing for the same reason.... cost of loosing them.

    I truly just wish I could find a good hammered diamond jig mold in the 8-10-12oz range and I would be a happy camper... Those are the ones I loose the most of...

    DOES ANYBODY READING THIS KNOW OF A COMPANY THAT MAKES HAMMERED DIAMOND JIG MOLDS? I know theres one out there since there are some really good ones that can be bought. Somebodys got to be making the molds for'm to pour in...

    In regards to harder poured lures, There's suppose to be a lead alloy called "babbit" that's both harder and more shiny than lead. I think this might be the stuff... Hard Casting Bullet Alloys

    Please post some pictures up for us to see if you have any...

    Thanks

    Hog

    Just FYI
    I found this reading about pouring cast and harder type lead

    LEAD INFORMATION

    LEAD ALLOYS
    There are two general types of lead alloy, -soft lead- (mostly pure lead) and -hard lead- (an alloy of lead and a harder metal.) Pure lead melts at 621 degrees F. and has excellent pouring characteristics at 700-800 degrees. A hard lead alloy may solidify too quickly and require more effort to mold good parts.

    SOFT LEAD
    Soft lead can usually be identified by pressing or scratching your thumb nail into it. If it scratches easily, it is probably soft lead. If you can not scratch it at all or only with pressure, it is not soft lead. Since soft lead has a relatively low working temperature (700-800 degrees for most applications), it is easy to use. Small jigs and sinkers, as well as spinner jig lures, are much easier to cast when using soft lead. Soft lead is a necessity for use with bendable type sinkers such as split shot or pinch-on sinkers.

    HARD LEAD (Tire Weights, etc.)
    Hard lead is difficult to mold with and is not recommended. Hard lead is a combination of lead and other added metals that make the lead harder than pure lead. The other metals can cause the alloy, when poured into a mold, to solidify at temperatures where pure or soft lead is still fluid. Because of this, more heat or a faster rate of pour may be necessary to get complete castings with hard lead. The main appeal of a hard lead alloy for sinker and lure making is that it can often be purchased at less cost than soft lead. This advantage can be offset by difficulty in molding the metal. Wheel weights are a common source of hard lead. Since the main function of wheel weights is weight, they often contain a lot of tramp elements. Wheel weight compositions vary widely. If you acquire hard lead, remember that it will require more experimentation and effort than soft lead to pour complete castings. Hard lead may work well for some medium and large sinkers and lures, but avoid its use in the more difficult to mold small jigs and spinner baits. Do not use hard lead to make sinkers like split shot or pinch-on types. These sinkers must be easily bendable to work correctly. A hard lead alloy will make these sinkers too stiff to bend.

    Best molding results will be obtained using soft lead or a lead alloy that is at least 98% lead.
     
  18. Boston Tangler

    Boston Tangler Site Sponsor

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    Guys I've had much better luck with Steel or Iron molds. The molds referred to in the earlier post of AL molds, they don't hold heat well at all and its very hard for a beginner to pour anything large (ie over 2 or 3 oz) and have it come out without voids and wrinkles.

    That being said, I've stopped pouring lead I know too many people who have come down with all kinds of things from exposure to lead and even when done outside, its still pretty risky work - I have the scars to prove it.

    If you guys are really losing that many jigs, I would rather offer a bulk rate pricing plan, ship you bulk jigs without the package to save some money. We make Hammered Diamonds 85g to 420g How many do you need :eek:

    By the way pouring is an outdated term, most including ours commercially made jigs are now 'shot' using injection molded lead. Its the only way to completely fill the molds and get the casting 100% wrinkle free every time.

    If anyone wants to buy any pouring gear like a Lee bottom pour pot - I have some stuff I'll post over the weekend.
     
  19. Dave Nowlin

    Dave Nowlin Senior Member

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    Why not post a bulk rate schedule showing quantity breaks and pricing? That would be a sweet way to start the new year.
     
  20. spineyman

    spineyman Senior Member

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    Yes how about a break down of prices?