halibut jigging?

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by silky23, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

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    Anyone out tere have any experience butterfly jigging for halibut? Looks like I'll be deployed up in Alaska around the first week in august and if the oportunity presents itself I'd like to give it a try. Just wondering if standard butterly jigs work, what shapes/ styles/ wieght I should be focusing on. any info would be great.
     
  2. Boston Tangler

    Boston Tangler Site Sponsor

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    My customers in Alaska seem to buy more soft plastics and make up their rigs - there are these two brothers I get their names but they have been catching #150 Monsters on my 7" Glow squids....

    Send me a stamped self addressed envelop and I will send you some for free as you are a service man - thanks!:D :D :D
     

  3. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

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    My customers in Alaska seem to buy more soft plastics and make up their rigs - there are these two brothers I get their names but they have been catching #150 Monsters on my 7" Glow squids....

    Send me a stamped self addressed envelop and I will send you some for free as you are a service man - thanks!:D :D :D

    Thank you very much for that. We will be fishing the Ancorage area, I was going to attempt to use my 600g OTI w/ cabo 80, I'm affraid that the reel might not hold up to one of those brutes. I'm hearing it should be a perfect settup for lingcod though.
     
  4. ALW

    ALW Senior Member

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    The last time I fished there, cut bait was used and was ok. I did better with jigs. Same jigs used for Tuna. Just need some heavy enough for the current. Most of the boats I fished on had good rods and reels. Was not necessary to bring a rod and reel. Always caught a limit nomatter what terminal tackle was used.
     
  5. anglerinshore

    anglerinshore Member

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    Fished for Halibut and Lingcod out of Seward last year and used a avet reel with a G Loomis Bucara rod and it did nicely. Only caught Halibut up to around 40lbs. with this rod, but they don't really bulldog like an AJ or tuna. I would think your setup would do just fine unless you get one over a 100lbs. which are not very common. I fished with Crackerjack Charters and they did a pretty good job. There are a lot of good ones up there so if you have time do some research and i'm sure you'll find a great boat. Good luck.
     
  6. anglerinshore

    anglerinshore Member

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    Oh, i fogot to mention that most lures were jigs with soft plastics. Much like Grouper jigs, but i would think that if you kept the butterfly type jigs close to the bottom and worked them a little slower you could do pretty good. Most captains will make you quit fishing after you keep your two halibut so i would keep one and then try to get some lingcod until you catch a big halibut. Then quit. It's worth shipping it back even though it will cost a few hundred dollars. Halibut here in Georgia is about 18 dollars a pound so do the math on what you catch and what it costs to ship.
     
  7. Albiemanmike

    Albiemanmike Senior Member

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    My buddie did an Alaska charter trip last June he won in a contest. They fished really deep water and used literally 2-3 pounds of lead and cut bait. He said it was due to the current and depth that they used so much weight. He said reeling in the fish was a real PIA with all of that weight and a fish as well. Not a lot of fun from what I gathered. But i think if you could get the right boat that is willing to put you on top of fish and then let you fish them your way it could be a blast. I will be waiting to hear your first barn door report Good Luck!!!!
     
  8. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    I visited Alaska and British Columbia for halibut and salmon jigging almost every year for two decades.
    I still can not find better jig than scampi jigs which is very popular among local fishermen in Alaska. It is normal leadead jigs with teasers which they call Scampi jigs.

    My normal jigs for halibut are Luhr Jensens' Crippled Herring, Solvkroken Viking Jigs or diamond jigs. Dave Irving and myself tested several different styles of Japanese jigs for halibut in Kodiak Island, AK last year and they worked as well.We must caught and released 40 -50 halibut each on that day.

    The sizes of jigs depend on where you fish. You can catch halibut as shallow as 40 - 50 ft and as deep as 700 - 900 ft.
    As Albiemanmike said, I used 2 - 3 pound sinker for targeting trophy halibut in Kennedy Channel off Homer, AK years ago, but I usually use 5 - 16 oz jigs fishing in 50 - 200 ft water. There are areas you can jig with 5 - 6 oz jigs and there are areas you have to use heavy jigs over 10 oz though it is shallower than 100 ft due to strong current.
     
  9. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

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    I visited Alaska and British Columbia for halibut and salmon jigging almost every year for two decades.
    I still can not find better jig than scampi jigs which is very popular among local fishermen in Alaska. It is normal leadead jigs with teasers which they call Scampi jigs.

    My normal jigs for halibut are Luhr Jensens' Crippled Herring, Solvkroken Viking Jigs or diamond jigs. Dave Irving and myself tested several different styles of Japanese jigs for halibut in Kodiak Island, AK last year and they worked as well.We must caught and released 40 -50 halibut each on that day.

    The sizes of jigs depend on where you fish. You can catch halibut as shallow as 40 - 50 ft and as deep as 700 - 900 ft.
    As Albiemanmike said, I used 2 - 3 pound sinker for targeting trophy halibut in Kennedy Channel off Homer, AK years ago, but I usually use 5 - 16 oz jigs fishing in 50 - 200 ft water. There are areas you can jig with 5 - 6 oz jigs and there are areas you have to use heavy jigs over 10 oz though it is shallower than 100 ft due to strong current.

    Were you dragging the jigs or bouncing them?
     
  10. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Were you dragging the jigs or bouncing them?
    Bouncing. If you drag, you don't get many bites from halibut, but get plenty of bites from buttom. As soon as you hit the bottom, you got to lift your rod. Otherwise you lose lots of jigs.
    You don't need to jig very hard. Just jig slowly up and down bouncing off the bottom. I experiemted glow jigs for halibut, but I don't see the effectiveness of glow jigs for them.
    Which part of Alaska do you plan to go ?
     
  11. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

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    Bouncing. If you drag, you don't get many bites from halibut, but get plenty of bites from buttom. As soon as you hit the bottom, you got to lift your rod. Otherwise you lose lots of jigs.
    You don't need to jig very hard. Just jig slowly up and down bouncing off the bottom. I experiemted glow jigs for halibut, but I don't see the effectiveness of glow jigs for them.
    Which part of Alaska do you plan to go ?
    I'll be working at the AFB near Anchorage, I believe Homer is the Port being mentioned by the guys up there. Will the same jigs take lingcod?
     
  12. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

    1,616
    79
    My customers in Alaska seem to buy more soft plastics and make up their rigs - there are these two brothers I get their names but they have been catching #150 Monsters on my 7" Glow squids....

    Send me a stamped self addressed envelop and I will send you some for free as you are a service man - thanks!:D :D :D
    PM sent, thank you!