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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've more luck hooking up using sabiki type assist hooks. Since I was bored at home yesterday, I decided to experiment and transform one of my assist hook into a fly. I figured if saltwater flies can hook up monsters on the surface, why not try it underwater with a jig. I'm not a fly angler and surely not a master in tying flies. This is what I came up with some stuff I got at home. It's not a work of art by any stretch of the imagination. It looks more like a fly only frankenstein would love. :p I think I need to add some sort of eyes. I made another one just to see the action underwater. I filled a bucket with water and started bobbing it up and down underwater. The action of the fur and flashabou looks so natural and enticing. I will surely try it out on my next trip.
 

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Not nearly as fancy, but I leave my tag end long (about to bend of hook). It frays up and I think helps attract also. Good idea with the fly style, but I think it likely will get shredded pretty quick. But so what, if you are doing it yourself and you like doing it. IMO it sure won't hurt.
 

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There was a video where it showed fish hitting a metal jig. most of the fish were attacking the assist hook that had a little red strip on the hook
 

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I started using teasers on my rear single hooks, I like the way they swim after seeing Sami use them. In addition three months ago in NC we used dressed up assist hooks with great results especially in glow flashing
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
On my way home I found a fly tackle shop near my house, so I bought some supplies. When I got home, I made another fly assist hook. I don't mind if it gets trashed after one hook-up, as long as the rate of hookups increases. It's not hard to make one and the materials are not that expensive. I think I'm getting the hang of this fly tying stuff. Here's some pics.
 

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Lookin good!:)

Not being critical at all... But a few points in case some are new to jigging and looking for ideas...

Assist cord should be ~1/3 jig length. (And I go less than that on long jigs.) On the fall, long assist will put the hook a LONG way from the jig. I find I get better hookup rate per bite with shorter cord, and shorter assist tangles less on jig and leader. (Might be another part of reason for better hookups!;))

Hook gap should always be wider than the body of jig. No tangles, better hookup rate.

Fly bodies look really good. But for those without time or inclination the 2.5" squid bodies are quick and effective alternative. They're cheap, quick to install on existing bare assists, and you can keep several colors on hand. (Glow seems to work really well.)

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That's an on-going discussion. I've used sabiki style assist hooks with cords that are over half the length of the jig and more and it gets hammered. As far as hooks you either use one that has a significantly wider gap than the jig or small enough that it can't wedge the body of the jig in the gap. There are jigs in the market like the revolver jig that are just too wide to find a hook that has a gap wider that the body of the jig. So in this case you need to go small. Pic below of a bonito that bit on the drop. Notice how the assist cord's length is as long as the jig, and the hook a small gap sabiki style assist hook. In jigging, for me the most important things to follow are to jig where the fish are which means location (hits on the fish finder or well known area for your target species) and depths of where the fish are. You know how at times you're jigging and you get a hit and then slack your jig is gone taken by some toothy creature. I think this is more likely to happen with assist cords that are short. I think what's happening is the fish is going after the hook on the downward motion when the short assist cord is so close to the leader that when the fish hits it not only does it bites the hook but it bites through the leader in the process. The jig is such a big target for a fish to miss that it could attack it at different angles. A hook on the other hand is small and if the fish attacks it when it's so close to the leader, say bye bye to the jig. Anyway, this is just my observation. Some anglers in asia tape the assist cord to the jig to ensure that the fish only goes after the jig and getting hooked in the process. I guess in a way they this minimizes the chances of the leader getting cut.
 

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