Fish saver device

Discussion in 'Sportfishing Regulations and Legislation' started by a1flyfishr, Jul 21, 2020.

  1. a1flyfishr

    a1flyfishr Retired Member Supporting Member

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  2. DenisB

    DenisB Senior Member

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    Yep they work well...........the key to using them is not to retard/slow the fish & release weight from dropping under its own weight only, then a sharp jerk at the desired release depth.
    besides ............the quicker the fish gets back to its original swimming depth , the better....... this minimises the barotrauma injury.
    Easy to make your own deep drop release rig.
     
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  3. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    Very cool idea, how have I not seen this?
    I fish deep a lot. I know that many of my releases do not survive. I’ve never been comfortable with this.

    If it can’t or won’t be eaten or sold, I try my best not to kill anything.

    I’m going to make one of these. Soon.
    it looks very simple to duplicate

    It should be a mandate to have something like this on board when fishing deep.

    Instead of a “ retrieval line” I figure I could dedicate an older rod and reel to just the device.
    Thanks for the post.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
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  4. a1flyfishr

    a1flyfishr Retired Member Supporting Member

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    Glad to hear they work well Denis! I feel it’s much better for the fish than poking a whole with a needle.

    Benny
     
  5. a1flyfishr

    a1flyfishr Retired Member Supporting Member

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    Yes NC I was thinking the same the bottom end of a broken rod with a tip installed should be fine.

    Benny
     
  6. Stevo

    Stevo Well-Known Member

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    I remember using this in Alaska at least 8 years ago. It’s mandatory for boats targeting rockfish. If you throw fish back without sending them down and they will float and FISH& GAME will see it , they will issue a citation right away. Plus you look like a ASS in front of the other boats and you will get called out. I remember sometimes using 2-3 lbs lead weights and fish would still not go down. After that we switched to a big halibut rod and 5 lb weights.
     
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  7. bnz

    bnz Just a guy who likes to fish

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    If not this look up the seaqualizer. It’s what I’ve used on my boat the last couple of years and fish do not float back up. Adjustable to release at 50’, 100’, and 150’ with the regular model.
     
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  8. Kim

    Kim Senior Member

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    I'm with Bnz on the Seaqualizer. I got mine free several years back when they wanted people to test them out, so far it's the best release device I have used.
     
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  9. a1flyfishr

    a1flyfishr Retired Member Supporting Member

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    Which one of the seaqualizer? The Boga style or the bid safety pin looking one?

    Benny
     
  10. Kim

    Kim Senior Member

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    Boga style.
     
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  11. Howardgo3

    Howardgo3 Member

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    We’ve been using these in Western Australia for many years. They were invented by Gary Lilly who was deckying on Al Bevans boat (shikari) targeting Samson fish (Al also pioneered deep jigging for Samson’s here). I was one of the principal investigators working on “Samson Science” and was out on Al’s boat for several days each week of the season. Release weights work! So much so that they are now mandatory on ALL recreational and charter boats in WA. The release weights work far better than needles that often puncture organs, even when used by experienced people, and often (probably usually) when used by inexperienced people. The release weight shown looks overly complicated and the “hook” seems way too long for easy release, I will post a photograph of the commercially available ones here. They are also easy to make, fill a beer can with molten lead, attach a barbless hook at one end and a big ring or swivel at the other (in the lead). Attach this to a knackered old reel on a broken old rod or a heavy hand line and bob’s your uncle. We released lots of fish which were tagged and are known to suffer serious barotrauma, we had many recaptures, they survived, whether bar atrium a affected their reproductive capacity we don’t know, but they survived and I would suspect that even if their reproductive capacity was compromised they would still be reproducing even if at a lower output.
    Cheers,
    Howard
     
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  12. Howardgo3

    Howardgo3 Member

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    Me again,
    To see the release weight, and other tips on releasing Samson’s, YTK, amberjacks and other carangids, type in Samson Science and hit “catching and caring for Samson Fish - Fish.wa.gov.au” . It also has length/weight relationships for sambos, which are pretty equivalent for YTKs and amberjacks for you guys who release them. Having just had another her look at the site I’m pissed off, I wrote this as a paper with my student, and my names not even on it, pricks! In my previous post I stuffed up, the ring/swivel goes on the hook and not on the other end.
    Cheers,
    Howard
     
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  13. Howardgo3

    Howardgo3 Member

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    69F6A977-7A6B-40CC-82C5-73C3E67FE691.jpeg Hi yet again,
    If anyone is interested the original article from which the fisheries brochure was produced can be found on page 96 of the proceedings found at “Responsibilities - The 4 R - ANZCCART”. The article has lots of other tips on making sure that fish can be released in the best possible shape. I’m not only a (retired) fish biologist but an avid fisherman and believe that we must be seen to be doing the right thing to ensure that groups like PETA and the Pugh Foundation don’t stop us doing what we love. The fish in the photo was a Samson fish of approximately 26kg caught on a 40g jig with barbless assist hooks on 6kg gear while targeting smaller species, after a quick photo and swimming her she powered off, hopefully to produce more.
    Cheers,
    Howard
     
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