Fish cleaning knives

Discussion in '360 Degrees Lounge' started by gimmedeal, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. gimmedeal

    gimmedeal Senior Member

    638
    33
    On our last Big E trip Frank made mention of how sharp my knives were. I told him that I sharpened my knives before each trip on a machine.

    I can't abide a dull knife.

    Over the years I've sharpened my our pocket, hunting, and now fishing knives. I've used Arkansas stones, diamond hones, guide devices, pocket sharpeners and most of the kitchen type sharpeners. A few years back I ran across an old (but brand new) Loray motorized sharpener and it does a better, more consistent job of sharpening than anything else I've used. It's pretty simply a belt type machine that uses 20" sanding belts. It has a guide/clamp that attaches to the blade and keeps the angle correct. You've got to use a little care to use very little pressure so as not to build heat and ruin temper. With some specialized sharpening belts including a finishing leather belt, it's real easy to get an edge that pops hair. A sharp knife sure makes fish cleaning easier. View attachment 7999

    View attachment 8000

    View attachment 8001
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Billiam

    Billiam Moderator

    581
    0
    Nice collection you have there, do you have any suggestions on cheap knives that work best, and maybe also cheap sharpeners for those with not too much expertise or room for a professional sharpener?
     

  3. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

    2,835
    107
    Gimmedeal,
    I also love sharp knives. I also have a huge collection of fishing knives. I'm not at home or I'd take some pictures. My old stand by is still the tri-angler sharpener. I also have a couple of the chef's choice electric sharpeners. They are nice for roughing out, but don't leave a razor edge. I also use a 12" diameter round wet stone that turns at a slow speed in water with a 1/3hp motor. It takes one gallon of water just for the absorption on the stone. Leather is the key for the final touch.

    For you guys that want a nice sharp edge and want something inexpensive, I use the device below. It has carbide blades in a "V" shape. They are great. I have these all over the place. Nothing on the market for the price can get a knife sharp as these with no skill involved.

    AccuSharp Knife Sharpener - White - $10.39 Delivered! - eBay (item 110415613745 end time Aug-18-09 11:56:18 PDT)
     
  4. peterk814

    peterk814 Senior Member

    1,543
    169
    for my dexters, notihng better than a whetstone or a ceramic stone sharpener.

    Yes knives can be TOO sharp.
     
  5. hamptonsurf

    hamptonsurf Senior Member

    1,263
    1
    nice set.....no skinner? Check one out, they are AWESOME when you have a big haul. Easier on the hand/wrist and can make any cut you want.
     
  6. gimmedeal

    gimmedeal Senior Member

    638
    33
    The 3 knives that you can't see very well (they're in black scabbards) are Cold Steel carbon fillet knives. They have a teflon coating on the blades that keeps em from rusting. The sharpened edge will rust but I keep a little oil on it until use and clean and dry after. Stainless is great but carbon blades get very keen.
    Dexter Russell makes a good knife of quality steel. you can get most anything sharp but a good steel will stay sharp. I was also sharpening a few Japanese blades. They're supposed to be sharpened on a whetstone but I have a couple of special belts that work very well on them once you've created your angle.

    Fred
     
  7. cabosandinh

    cabosandinh Moderator

    5,708
    687
    I use this, works very well, few strokes through it and
    I can slice paper; carbide wheels on 1 side, ceramic
    wheels on the other side (for finishing) + rat tail
    diamond stick for serrrated knives

    Amazon.com: Meyerco® Sharpen-It™ Knife Sharpener with Sheath: Sports & Outdoors


    most stainless steel blades can not hold an edge as
    long as a good carbon steel, 440C is good, D2 tool
    steel and S30V are scary sharp for a long time

    high end Japanese steel are probably the best, but at
    $2000 a knife they better be
     
  8. Squished

    Squished Senior Member

    1,635
    12
    I'd like to bump this thread up even though it's approaching a year old, rather than start a new thread. What seems to be the concenus on a good, cheaper, fillet knife? Are Dexter Russells still the knife of choice for cheaper fillet knives? I broke out my Berkley last week, it was dull as can be and even after sharpening it was still dull.

    My reasoning, last trip out on a head boat I let the mates fillet my fish and ended up with a fillet of bones. I've decided to stop being lazy and I'm going to fillet myself, even if they do it for only $1 per fish.
     
  9. cabosandinh

    cabosandinh Moderator

    5,708
    687
    I'd like to bump this thread up even though it's approaching a year old, rather than start a new thread. What seems to be the concenus on a good, cheaper, fillet knife? Are Dexter Russells still the knife of choice for cheaper fillet knives? I broke out my Berkley last week, it was dull as can be and even after sharpening it was still dull.

    My reasoning, last trip out on a head boat I let the mates fillet my fish and ended up with a fillet of bones. I've decided to stop being lazy and I'm going to fillet myself, even if they do it for only $1 per fish.

    Dexter Russell are good knives, as is Forschner,
    Victorinox

    I think Victorinox make blades/knives for Forschner
    and Dexter. Classified as high carbon steel, which is
    good. If you buy cheap stainless steel knives, you will
    be disappointed. The steel is too soft and will roll over
    easily leaving you with a mostly dull edge. Only
    way to fix this is make one cut, steel it ... repeat

    Knives of Alaska Coho is another of my favorite for
    finishing a fillet (trimming or taking meat off skin )

    Buy a Meyerco sharpener and take it with you on fishing
    trips
     
  10. MikeF

    MikeF Senior Member

    2,627
    57
    Not to sound like a "waster" but a lot of people IMO tend to try a little too hard to get every ounce of meat they can from a fish. Most of the time the extra you get isn't the best meat.

    Those are great knives and sharpening is a great hobby but I don't think unless you're putting on a show it's really that big of a deal.
     
  11. Taz575

    Taz575 Senior Member

    1,334
    9
    I prefer the Japanese blades myself. I tried some of the Dexter International series, eh, ok. Steel is kinda soft. The Shun Wasabi's are pretty nice, all stainless, hollow ground back sides that take a nice edge and hold it decently. I didn't like taking my carbon Deba on boats for saltwater; I had to clean the blade a few times to get the rust off :( The Wasabi 8" deba and 9" sashimi are now in my boat kit. I have higher end Japanese stuff, but I keep it off the boat due to rust issues! The Shun Deba and Sashimi will work nicely on tuna, and I keep a few Dexters and smaller Japanese fillet knives around for the smaller fish.

    For traditional styles, Dexter and Victorinox/Forschner are nice. For my normal fillet knifes, i will often use my 1x30 belt sander with a slack belt and then strop the edge. My Japanese knives get waterstones and take wicked edges. I got cut once and didn't even know it until I washed my hands and my hand was stinging!
     
  12. Kaley

    Kaley Senior Member

    138
    0
    I sharpen for the sake of keeping every ounce of meat on my fingers.
     
  13. cabosandinh

    cabosandinh Moderator

    5,708
    687
    You spend a lot of time n effort n money to catch great tasting fish. Maximize your yield of fillets is worthwhile
     
  14. Astronut

    Astronut Senior Member

    3,179
    342
    I use this, works very well, few strokes through it and
    I can slice paper; carbide wheels on 1 side, ceramic
    wheels on the other side (for finishing) + rat tail
    diamond stick for serrrated knives

    Amazon.com: Meyerco® Sharpen-It™ Knife Sharpener with Sheath: Sports & Outdoors


    most stainless steel blades can not hold an edge as
    long as a good carbon steel, 440C is good, D2 tool
    steel and S30V are scary sharp for a long time

    high end Japanese steel are probably the best, but at
    $2000 a knife they better be
    X2..This guy knows his knives..and sharpeners, trust me on this one... Following his advice I bought the Meyerco sharpener and couldn't be happier.

    astro..
     
  15. JayP

    JayP Member

    74
    1
    I got one of those Knives of Alaska (don't know which model but it is one of the larger ones) and it got rust spots on the edge. This created a bunch of 1 mm notches in the edge, which required extensive sharpening to get out. Oh, this happened before the knife was even used, or maybe it was used one time. It must have gotten a little salt spray on it. Never had problems like that with my Rapala, although the Rapala wouldn't hold an edge...

    The high carbon knives may be better steel for use in a KITCHEN but they are also the quickest to rust and in a salt environment there's a trade off to be made.

    Last year I did quite a bit of research on knives, and although I can't remember the details I decided to go with Forschner. Haven't used them a whole lot yet, but the initial sharpness is very good.

    Also I picked up a bottle of mineral oil from the drug store. It's non-toxic (sold as a laxative) and is recommended by avid knife users to help prevent corrosion.
     
  16. cabosandinh

    cabosandinh Moderator

    5,708
    687
    here are pics of few knives that I'd recommend for
    fish cleaning that are not too expensive and will do the
    job well

    One collection

    Kershaw D2 , for heavy breaking job

    Victorinox Granton edge fillet knife

    Forschner Granton edge fillet knife

    Dexter Breaking knife

    Blue Handle F Dick , non Granton edge , for smaller fish

    Knives of Alaska Coho for fillet & trimming

    Victorinox 2

    Another view
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Astronut

    Astronut Senior Member

    3,179
    342
    :eek: Need I say more..

    astro...:p
     
  18. cabosandinh

    cabosandinh Moderator

    5,708
    687
    Sharpeners

    1. variety sharpeners

    2. Medium Diamond

    3. Fine Diamond

    4. pocket sharpeners, keep these nearby while cleaning

    5. Steels:
    top - hard steel
    center - diamond steel, can sharpen a little
    ceramic - super fine for straightening very thin/fine blade

    6. wusthof - good general kitchen sharpener, about 15deg

    7. Tormek Super Grind, I can sharpen anything with this
    machine and can get it razor sharp: slice paper like a
    razor blade

    8. Leather strop on Tormek

    9. 1200 grit water stone

    I hope this helps in your selection process

    I've been sharpening and collecting
    blades for about 30 years. Each is good in its own
    right and circumstances. A $3000 Shun knife is not
    a blade to take offshore fishing, a $5 Rapala is not
    adequate to clean a bony amberjack, choose carefully
     

    Attached Files:

  19. boseafish

    boseafish Junior member

    5
    0
    For what it is worth, I found the best deal on sushi knives at a resturant supply store in Chinatown in Philly.
     
  20. DenisB

    DenisB Senior Member

    5,665
    783
    I sharpen for the sake of keeping every ounce of meat on my fingers.

    x2

    really sharp knives only require a light touch to do their job. The more pressure you have to put on the blade to get it to do its job the worse the injuries when things don't go the way you plan them to.

    He He........eldest son ( ex Chef ) and family visited at Easter & picked up my Shun Wasabi sashimi knife I used to carve the roast. Got a shock at just how sharp those devils are.
    Yeah, slumming I know, using one to carve the roast, but it does it better than any other knife I have ever owned.