Exotic Hunting - Sika Stag and Black Hawaiian Ram down

Discussion in 'HUNTING' started by Earl, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. Earl

    Earl Senior Member

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    I just got back from a wonderful hunt with Steven Searcey at Pecan Crossing Ranch outside of Lampasas, Texas and his guide Shelby Floyd - I had a wonderful hunt with them.

    I had arrived early yesterday so Steven met me earlier than originally planed since the weather was clearing and we went for an afternoon hunt.

    I had booked a Sika Hunt for the Sika I posted on a week or two back. Looks like we were a bit off on judging him. As I had posted up earlier, I was also interested in a ram if the opportunity was there for a good one that I thought would look nice on the wall. We were hunting on Friday to allow a chance at an Aoudad if I decided to take one of them. He has several Aoudad at a great price ($500) but I decided I wanted an animal that was a bit more mature (the Aoudad were 2 years old and in the 15"-16" range). He's pretty much cleaning them out - others had allready gotten the bigger animals.

    Several sheep topped a hill making their way down towards a feeder. There were 2 mouflan and a desert paint in the bunch. We waited to see if the bigger and older black hawaiian would come along after them and he did. He presented a shot at about 160 yards. I shot him through the left shoulder with a 130gr .270 and he pretty much dropped right there.
    He his horns measure 25 inches with 9 inch bases.

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    With the ram down we decided to see if we could find the Sika. To this point we had seen quite alot of game but no Sika. Later in the evening we came accross them. First a nice younger stag, and then a famale with a yearling.

    Then we found the one we were hunting for - a 5 year old stag. He had not seen us and was walking away from us. I was not going to take one of those "Texas Heart" shots so we waited to see if he would either turn broadside and present a shot opportunity or if we would have to move and try and get ahead of him. In the end he did turn and present a broadside shot allowing me to shoot him in the left shoulder at 150 yards. He ran maybe 20 or 30 yeards before going down for good.

    His beams are 21-3/4 inches on one side and 21-1/4 inches on the other, with 18" spread between the two, and 5" bases. One of the points is kind of small but he makes up for it with the length and mass.


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    He may present the taxidermist with a fun problem as the sika forms that we were looking at in his books only went to 20 inches on the neck. This fellow has a 23" neck. He was rutted up beyond all belief - stinky, stinky, stinky (note to self, don't put gun on a sika ever again)...

    I don't know exactly how they might score as far as ROE or SCI - the taxidermist didn't know off hand how to score exotics but said he'll look it up. Any info or guesses you guys might give would be appreciated. I'm thinking for certain the Sika will be in silver if not gold medal territory - he's bigger than any either the taxidermist or the processor has seen.

    The ram, I don't know if he'd make any record book or be just under. At any rate, they are both my first and likely only examples of each type of animal and will be going on my wall (once I buy the wife off).

    The Sika was taken to P&R Processing a few miles south of Lampasas - close to where Pecan Crossing is located. I took the heads that had been caped to Stephen Swaim at Buffalo Ridge Taxidermy in Waco.

    I would really recommend anyone wanting to book an exotic hunt at not a truly exotic price with Steven at Pecan Crossing. You will (I think) come away very happy.

    When we settled up the price was $100 more than what I thought it was going to be - but I did not say anything as I figured I had made a mistake and besides I was going to give it to Steven and Shelby as a tip anyways.

    Steven both called and sent me a PM later that he had made a mistake and offered to send the money to me, that's an honest man there. Alot of people wouldn't have said anything.

    My hat's off to Shelby too. He nailed the distances on the animals as good as my range finder did - and he guessed the length on the rams's horns to the exact inch. And he was great (as well as quick) on the skinning and caping too.

    Had a great time Steven and Shelby and looking forward to going back for a blackbuck sometime!

    Earl
     
  2. kidflex

    kidflex Senior Member

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    nice ram. should make a great mount. thanks for sharing
     

  3. Bret

    Bret Senior Member

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    very nice Earl!!!! Congrats on a successful hunt!! let me know how they taste.. never had sika..
     
  4. Earl

    Earl Senior Member

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    Thanks. I'm hopeful on the sika. I have heard both good and bad about them. I'm having summer & pan sausage as well as tamales done along with the usual ground, steaks, tenders, etc. so we will see.

    As for the ram...well I just really haven't heard much good about rams at all in the culinary department. Since I still have venison in the freezer, not counting the sika and plan to add more this year - the ram meet found a better home.

    Earl
     
  5. galveston1602

    galveston1602 Senior Member

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    Great animals!!

    As long as the sika wasnt in rut, and it was handled properly, everything should taste fine, oh wait it was in rut :) if everything was handled exactly perfect, then youll have a great pile of meat, if the handling was even a little off, it'll taste off.

    Did you have a whistling problem? I love stalking sika, its quite a challenge, since they love to whistle and alert the others in the herd!
     
  6. Earl

    Earl Senior Member

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    I know to stop a whitetail with a grunt call but I had no idea what kind of noise worked for Sika (and no, I can't whistle properly - not and be heard at 150 yards anyways).

    The meat was definitely handled well (gutted & skinned quickly then taken to a processor) - but oh my was he rutted up. I had no choice on that though as that is why he was available for the price I paid. He was getting the better of much larger red deer and axis because he was much more agressive than them and the ranch owner was afraid he was going to kill something.

    Earl