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After I opened my jigging and popping shop, I noticed that many fishermen prefer particular colors.
There are many customers looking for Dorado Slider or Smith Baby Runoh and Tackle House Shibuki. Most fishermen are looking for similar dark colors. When I said I have only bright yellow/red color are left, they just don't buy them even they are looking for the same lures desperately.
When I tell them brigth color work for daytime, they just ignored my opinions as if I am telling them to sell my products.

Color is important, but fish oftenly don't agree with color selection you make.

Don't be afraid to use fancy bright color daytime and you'll be rewarded with nice tuna. I heard two bluefin caught on Capt Dom's boat on Friday were on bright yellow/red color lures.
 

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Honestly Kil bright colors are my first choices. Pink is always thrown first the same when I drop a jig. Pink Dorado Slider or Oceas work great for tuna, bright yellow Runboh's work great for tuna.

I seldom use anything other than bright colors or flashy blue colors. Same with my jigs
 

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Honestly Kil bright colors are my first choices. Pink is always thrown first the same when I drop a jig. Pink Dorado Slider or Oceas work great for tuna, bright yellow Runboh's work great for tuna.

I seldom use anything other than bright colors or flashy blue colors. Same with my jigs
Glenn,I know it works.:) When I fish Panama this weekend, bright yellow/red lures are going to be my choice. :)
It is no wonder Raza outfished other fishermen on the boat with pink Runboh when they fished cubera snapper in Panama.
 

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Glenn,I know it works.:) When I fish Panama this weekend, bright yellow/red lures are going to be my choice. :)
It is no wonder Raza outfished other fishermen on the boat with pink Runboh when they fished cubera snapper in Panama.

In Panama I used exclusively red, orange, PINK, Yellow and black. All bright colors in those waters work great. pink runboh is a fish magnet there especially with cubera and blue trevallys love them.

They work here as well especially on tuna
 

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I agree. Bright colors work. Over the years, I generally use the following rule if working the upper top water column. This is for plugs and trolling lures.
Clear days = bright colors.
Cloudy overcast days = dark colors.

Fishing middle to deep water, it's your lure or jig action that entices strikes, not the color.
 

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pink runboh is a fish magnet...


Pink it was love at first sight
Pink when I turn out the light, and
Pink gets me high as a kite
And I think everything is going to be all right
No matter what we do tonight

Always my first choice!!:D
 

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i dont see why people like dark colors so much in the day time i can see dark colors being used at night when the fish cant really see anywayz but during the day if it looks delicious it is delicious :)
 

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Isnt it more important to "MATCH THE HATCH" ie attempt to use a lure that replicates approximately in colour and size the food source your tagret is feeding on?
This has certainly been my rational when choosing from my selection of lures, no good using pink if the tagret are feeding on Blue mackeral?
 

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i dont see why people like dark colors so much in the day time i can see dark colors being used at night when the fish cant really see anywayz but during the day if it looks delicious it is delicious :)

Fish can see quite well at night, often feed voraciously then and the concept behind dark colors is that they provide better contrast against the ocean's surface which is significantly brighter due to moon/starlight.

Dark colors = strong silhouette in lower light conditions and they work quite well in deep water or early/late in the day.

Matching the hatch is one approach (size most critical) but sometimes to trigger an aggressive strike you want something the fish can really see as true "hatch" colors are the actual camouflage that bait fish use to hide from predators.
 

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Fish can see quite well at night, often feed voraciously then and the concept behind dark colors is that they provide better contrast against the ocean's surface which is significantly brighter due to moon/starlight.

Dark colors = strong silhouette in lower light conditions and they work quite well in deep water or early/late in the day.

Matching the hatch is one approach (size most critical) but sometimes to trigger an aggressive strike you want something the fish can really see as true "hatch" colors are the actual camouflage that bait fish use to hide from predators.

Very good info that you posted John.
 

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What you see with the lure in hand ( or hanging on the rack in the shop) is not what the fish sees in the water.
colours change with distance from the lure in the water.

pink is a great 'go-to' colour as it changes from red tone to greyscale within a relatively short distance and presents as a grey which is nondescript & could represent just about any baitfish of the size of the lure.
fluorescent pink however will remain pink for a greater distance and depth.

Blue retains its colour at greatest depth & distance in water.

'Matching the hatch' is primarily about matching bait size , shape & action.

Colour is about attracting attention
Colour is about contrast with the surrounding water and skyline conditions.
Colour is about contrasting body patterns against the background presenting patterns that the 'hatch' has.

Exactly matching size colour and action is about the hatch on days with a really finnicky bite and more about whats working on the day most of the time.
 
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