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We, three friends and I, scheduled to our annual tuna run for November 23 out of Dolphin Docks in Port Aransas. I live in Mexico and I look forward to make this trip every year with my brother. It is our time together away from the daily stress and routine, we have this tradition for the past 15 years. This time around, I had two good friends that wanted to make their first tuna trip. Unfortunately, my brother and a friend could not make the trip last minute due to work projects. This was my 11th 24-40 hrs. trip and as every trip before, I started prepping the equipment 3 months in advanced for four people. New penn slammer 6500hs, valiant 800, seigler lgn, saragosa 20K, saragosa 25K, slow pitch jigs, strikertackle jigs, halcos 190 and 220, fall flats, and other goodies were prepped to make this trip. We started driving from Mexico (Piedras Negras Coahuila) around 8 pm and arrived in Port Aransas around 12:30 am. We had our last meal at “W” and arrived at DD to wait for our ride “La Pesca”. As we waited, I explained last minute jigging techniques and boat layout to my friend. Several familiar faces were between the boat crew and guests.

At 2:45 am, the deckhands made an announcement I never heard before “please get in line to get your bunk beds”. I hurried to get in line and be as in front possible, but unfortunately did not get a bottom bunk bed. Originally, I was number four and my friend number five to board. We always reserve and pay our ticket as soon as possible to enjoy the benefit of choosing a good bunk bed away from the engine noise and diesel smell; this time, DD did not honor the monetary commitment. Then, the deckhands made us get off La Pesca again to bring our fishing equipment aboard. This time around, we were able to secure good spots. Finally, for the third time the deckhands made us get off the boat again. The captain called us to instruct about safety before parting. I was personally very impressed and happy with the captain comments and commitment: “I am going to play it safe, we are going to Perdido. There are very few reports of YFT being caught on other rigs. We will return until 7 pm on Sunday instead of 5 pm. I don’t want to miss the morning trolling window”. We boarded for the third time and off to a ten-hour nap.

We arrived at our fishing spot around 3:30 pm. It was about one and a half hour before our expected arrival time of 5 pm. I immediately saw the platform and did not recognized it as Perdido. I pulled out my satellite phone/GPS and checked the coordinates…to my surprise it was not Perdido. We trolled for about 2 hours and only caught one 60lbs yft. At this point, several guest were upset at the fact that only five people out of 26 were fishing. At around 6 pm, the captain set up for the first drift, I caught my first blackfin tuna in a pink strikertackle deep drop jig. The deckhand shamefully said to me that the captain told them that the first blackfin tunas caught were going to be bait for YFT. No one else caught anything during the first drift. We drifted several times for about one hour and very few blackfin funa were caught. Then the captain made a terrible announcement: “I cannot do this all night, I am going to do a Hail Mary and go to Perdido at this time. It is about 30 miles away. Take a nap”. All guests that were next to me thought we were at Perdido already. I checked my GPS one more time, and to my dismay, Perdido was 63 miles away from our location. We started our trip to Perdido around 8 pm.

Around 10 pm our engines went silent, I checked my watch and I thought to myself “wow we made good time”. Unfortunately, we had a fuel leak and we had to stop for about 45 minutes to get it fixed. We finally arrived to Perdido a little before 12 am. The captain made a few passes around the rig to spot fish and then said again “we are going three miles to away to a drill boat to check it”. We spent the night making these runs between the two rigs, which each trip took about 5 minutes each. I was able to catch 4 blackfin tunas, one of which was eaten by a barracuda due to tangled lines. My friend caught three blackfin tunas. Between all the guests, 13 yft tunas were caught. Biggest yft caught was 60 lbs (on the troll) and the rest were under 40 lbs. We totaled about 30 blackfin tunas between all the boat. YFT were caught on jigs and one with a halco. Around 5.15 am the captain decided to troll again for another two hrs. Again, his efforts did not produced any fish. Halfway the trip back, La Pesca had fuel problems again and we lost about an hour. We finally arrived to PA around 7:30 pm. Seas were calmed as I never seen before.

Our captain is learning his new trade; he opted to move to a different rig that cost us half of the fishing time; we fished for about 6 hours in a 36 hrs trip. We spent close to 30 hrs moving. We made a plan, changed it, and then realized it did not work and changed it again. The captain at some point started yelling to the guests: “guys, take your hands out of your a$$”. In my opinion, this is uncalled for when you are fishing with people that are 70 – 80 years old. The young captain tried his best to get to fish, but missed the whole point in what is to charter for people, to cater to your guests, and to be patient and stick to your plan. I have learned that in this trips that bite turns on or off in the blink of an eye, but you have to stay on the spot if you are marking fish. By moving that much, we missed that window. I still feel Dolphin Docks is the best company to charter your fishing trips. I have enjoyed each one of them.

This trip made me realize that these trips are not about fishing, but spending time together finding more about yourself and the people that are around you. I did not know my friend was going through a rough time and he needed this trip to get away and clear his head. I met an 80-year-old gentleman that enjoys the trips more than anybody even though he has to carry his oxygen supply to breath. A fellow angler that has been in the same trips as me for the past three years recognized me and I did not even knew is name before. I learned that patience is a virtue that few people have and that fishing is not about the fish, but the company and the patience to understand that fishing is like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the reply. I feel DD and the captain needs the feedback to turn the bolts and screws if needed. I fished with Tim before, he really understands the whole concept. This captain is a good guy, he is very knowledgabe about fishing, but he is getting experience and while getting experience he might miss several trips like this one. It just seems unfair that after all the preparation, time, and money on our end we only fished for about 6 hrs in a 36 hrs trip. I really hope he gets to stay in la pesca and make that boat sing again.
 

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Thanks for the terrific report. Sorry the trip didn’t work out exactly the way you hoped it would.

Maybe you and your friends would want to try doing a tuna trip out of San Diego one day on one of our better boats. Might be a fairly incredible experience, especially with the amazing Bluefin fishing we have had in the area for the last few years. It’s not just the fishing but also the fun of riding on a clean boat with excellent food and experienced captains and deckhands.
 

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Jagok
I agree with you on that trolling. Too much time for just a few guys having a chance.
I'm new to party boats so trying them all this year. The Buccaneer didn't troll and is fast enough to give you good fishing time.
 

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There are always going to be trips that just don't go right, as much as there are the ones where nothing can go wrong.

You got a tough one, and it sounds very frustrating based on what happened. However, it sounds to me, that everything was done facing a tough situation, to try and do his best to fix it, on the fly.

We've all played eany, meany , Minnie Moe, and lost... But even facing a non existent bite, you have no idea what a difficult decision it is, gambling on a 50+ mile run, at night, on a one night trip, only hoping it will be better enough to make up for lost fishing time, as well as breaking the cardinal rule of thirds in the charter industry (a fair trip gives 1/3 run out, 1/3 fishing time, and 1/3 trip in, to break it, a captain better have a damn good idea of a better than good result) it's almost an impossible decision, he made it, and your trip was better than if he had stayed put.

As far as the yelling and uploading, while its not necessary, some of us do or dont, and while it's typically good natured, it also gives the Captain a venue to vent frustration. It is very hard to put everything on the line, make a huge gamble, that should be paying off, only to watch people lose the fish to silly errors. The longer I ran, the less it bothered me, however it is always frustrating to watch someone or multiples keep doing things that cost them, others, and the catch total.

As far as the trolling goes, sometimes those 2-4 hours make a trip with yellowfin. And during the daylight hours there's not much else to honestly target, other than letting people "fake fish" unsuccessfully, to give the illusion of fishing time fairly shared, or possibly getting into the typical reef bite up close, that often produces only 5 or 6 small fish for the effort as well. It's a team sport and helps the entire catch, when it works. It's one of those things difficult to incorporate on a headboat, but a good rotation, both moving on a timer, and per bite, can get everyone involved as much as possible. It's a much better choice to get more yellowfin, than wasting time drifting in the daylight, before sunset. And the morning troll was obviously a gift, as they planned to stay late for it, even before it was desperately needed. However, when it is slow, it can feel like a drag and time waster. I was fishing on a trip around that same timeframe, and our first 11yft came in the 2 hours of evening troll, all on heavy tackle that everyone can handle bigger fish with. We also lost about 6, so the rotation kept moving. Another thing most people do not realize, is that the evening troll is also a tool for the Captain to map out the schools locations before planning the drift strategy. Lack of marks on the troll helped push him into deciding to roll the hero dice so early, I'd bet. If someone figures out a CONSISTENT way to SUCCESSFULLY target the yellowfin tuna at our local floaters, the way they do elsewhere, I promise there will be no more trolling during the day, and probably the entire structure that has been standard since we first figured they only bite at night just a few trial after Hoover was put on station, where we had originally been wasting nights to run at first, and sucking during the day, until we learned the groove. But in around 200 trips I've been out to our floaters, both as a captain, a deckhand, and a client, i have never seen any action during the day except the 300 or so yft I've landed during the trolling hours, in the past 4 years.

As far as a change of plan or bad decision, that happen to everyone for any number of reasons. Don't blame that on inexperience. I've got a lifetime of professional fishing experience, and when I finished, looking back, I had almost as many wrong decisions as right. As I got older, I just developed better ways to work through or around the wrong ones.

Michael's a good guy, and is a great candidate to be able to rebrand that boat and turn it into a killing machine, as visas trying to do the last time I ran it. As long as the crew is excited, trying, and pushing to have great catches, no matter what, it's a he'll of a lot better than hos predecessor, who fished the exact same circuit, no matter what, and would just ride it out, when ever the fish forgot to show up.

Being newly returned to the status of "fishing client" I'd rather ride with those that shoot for the epic trip but miss, than the ones not willing to take chances and catch what shows up, or not.
 

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.

Our captain is learning his new trade; he opted to move to a different rig that cost us half of the fishing time; we fished for about 6 hours in a 36 hrs trip. We spent close to 30 hrs moving. We made a plan, changed it, and then realized it did not work and changed it again.

I learned that patience is a virtue that few people have.
Obviously, after 2 hours of trolling and 4 or five extremely unsuccessful drifts, the time gained by staying there, probably would have resulted in not just poor, but dismal results. Unfortunately, people valuing lousy fishing time over time needed to remedy a tough situation and miles that must be covered to go for a better result, is one of the reasons that I became disillusioned with the industry. Also knowing someone else , or even the same person, would giving a similarly poor review, had I chose to stay and it never "turned on in the blink of an eye"

It just seems unfair that after all the preparation, time, and money on our end we only fished for about 6 hrs in a 36 hrs trip.
It does, but there are many many reasons that it could be an unsuccessful trip. The only thing that truly matters is everyone that left in the boat, came back safely, and that is the captain's #1 responsibility. Although it didn't go as planned, for various reasons, he did his job, successfully. While everything you mentioned about time and money rings true, no one remembers that these crews that suspend more of their money, time, and effort for these trips as well. They know they will almost never recover money spent on special bait , lures, and rods to help the client catch in the tip jar, even on great trips, so they do it for pride. They want the best trip possible, and the client reaps the rewards when things go right. But every one of us , who gives even a tiniest scrap about fishing, as opposed to riding out paychecks, takes it very very hard when it all goes to hell

Jagok
I agree with you on that trolling. Too much time for just a few guys having a chance.
If the fish are biting well, and people up are landing them quickly, everyone has a chance, however, if it is slow, it can feel like just the first 5 or so numbers are getting the only action, however, if it's that slow, they're in the same boat as everyone else, just watching a rod while they do it. Still one extra 60# yet added to the tally, on a yellowfin trip, if better than a few almaco and maybe a dorado
 

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If the fish are biting well, and people up are landing them quickly, everyone has a chance, however, if it is slow, it can feel like just the first 5 or so numbers are getting the only action, however, if it's that slow, they're in the same boat as everyone else, just watching a rod while they do it. Still one extra 60# yet added to the tally, on a yellowfin trip, if better than a few almaco and maybe a dorado
I think the size of the group fishing on board should be taken into consideration. For instance .... on your former boat, The Pelican, the average size group on a floater trip was probably something like 10 - 12. On our trip on the Gulf Eagle (referenced in another thread) we had 12. On our trip everyone got at least one Yellowfin and some got two. It happened that the fish were there and our rotation was one number at a time vs, five rods trolling.

That situation does not work as well on Scat Cat trips where you have 24 anglers or for that matter 26 as mentioned on this trip on the La Pesca. Capt. Matt on the New Bucc takes 35+ ... so I have no suggestion for trolling when talking about that many folks.
 

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The Pelican, the average size group on a floater trip was probably something like 10 - 12.

That situation does not work as well on Scat Cat trips where you have 24 anglers or for that matter 26 as mentioned on this trip on the La Pesca. Capt. Matt on the New Bucc takes 35+ ... so I have no suggestion for trolling when talking about that many folks.
Yes I was fortunate to be very spoiled these past years, getting to limit my loads to manageable sizes, both boosting my success rate, and also allowing me to play the way I like to fish, most of the time.

While you are correct that it is more difficult for a large crowd to be able to individually see the overall benefit, when their turn probably won't appear, if done in numerical order, it's a team sport, the boat (as a whole) against the fish. Every fish landed helps the team , and if you cannot be happy for others that randomly get drawn first (favoritism being a very separate different issue) , but instead sulk about it not being you, i think fishing on any charter with more than one client just isn't for you. It's just like those people who would rather cut off hooked yft with blackfin, instead of actively getting in the game and Getting their fish out of the way, cutting their own line when its obvious that their fish is going to probably hinder the angler fighting the yellowfin, or just simply taking a break for a bit, so as not even chance a cluster when one or more people are worked to the down drift side after hooking yellowfin because "they paid the same" and shouldn't have to stop fishing. I've seen that type of selfishness way too many times, on all sorts of trips, never understand it, and it's a big part of the reason I've just about given up on people.

Sure it's hard to watch others get a sooner opportunity than yourself, but it can be fun and fulfilling, when your cheering on and supporting the team instead of sitting back grumbling. Obviously it's even harder to endure, when there is no action at all but even up to 30 ppl can have a reasonably fair rotations by having rotating teams (as opposed to counting 1-30 singularly in order) and moving them through with a combination of timed watches, as well as every bite. However, everytime I set this system up, even with 9 or 15 ppl, the worst of people always came out sooner or later, and instead of being happy fish were coming in for the boat, they'd be mad at their luck and position. Even when they farmed a fish doing something dumb, they would get mad their turn passed, while better anglers caught multiple fish faster. The funny thing is if everyone was drift or bottom fishing, the results are similar, but few get jealous of the guy who boats 5 yft at the same rate they loose 1 cut 2 off and land 2.5 blackfin.

At the end of the day, on a 1 night floater trip, when aj and snapper, the easy money , are closed, everyone is a kingfish snob, and not much else is happening that you could pause for, on the way out, to legitimately be sucessful with, the trolling in the evening is the best chance to add more yellowfin to the overall catch, and on these heavily loaded, more economic , trips, it's also not only the best , but usually the only, legitimate chance about a third of the anglers have to catch a yellowfin, assuming they draw a good spot.

The single night floater run really is set up just to go out and fish tbe dark hours, it is a 36hr, because the lapesca used to be slower, and took 12 hours to get to Hoover. Anything outside of those night time hours,doing the standard floater style drifting, is bonus, and should be seen as such, not as an entitlement. They could easily shorten the trip and time everything so the night is all there is, or worse, do what the last guy would, and drive slower to force it, reducing the workload.

On top of that , I will once again reiterate that the evening troll is one of a captain's most usefully tools for mapping out where the fish are holding, it could be done just as well without lines in the water, but while hunting, a few people, at least, aught to land some extra fish.

Im beating a dead horse here, and I believe we'll just have to agree to disagree, but I truly feel that, with a slightly different perspective, tbe value can easily be seen to outweigh the feeling of getting shortchanged.
 

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Oh and we can disagree, and will, it's just nice, after 8 years of censorship, to not have to tiptoe with my opinions online, as I'm not worried anymore about always pandering to any clients every whim and trying not to hurt the feeling of the sensitive, possibly killing a trip or two. And if I kill anyone's trips now, I could care less, maybe it will open a spot up for me to book
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Thank you Capt. James Wheeler for your reply. I was fortunate enough to fish with you before you retired.

You probably dont remember, but you changed my life... My very first trip you were a client also on that trip, I spoke to you and you gave me a vertical silver speed jig and told me it was the lucky one. I was around 14 years old at that time. I saved for an entire year to make up my trip and paid someone to drive me all the way to DD. I never fished any where in my life. I caught my first yellow fin, 55 lbs, I fell in love with the sport since then. You dont remember, but that small gesture changed my whole life and my family as well. I only have one brother that is 17 years older than me, because of family disagreements and other stuff, we grew apart for several years. After that trip with you, we schedule our first brother trip, every year we grew closer after each trip. You spend the trip helping me out learn how to fish. I thank immensely for what you did that day.

I really wish you felt different about the business, we need more captains like you. I am in the education business among other businesses in the private sector, I have been disappointed more than once, but yet I am here still feeling that I can make a difference. We just have to go back and reflect about the good things we have experienced in our trade to fuel us up.

I agree with most of what you said, but I only make 1 or 2 fishing trips a year if I am lucky. I have made 11 long range trips in about 10 years. I am jealous of people like you and others on the boat who can make several trips each year. I only have one chance to have an epic trip. Unfortunately, like you mentioned trollin must be well coordinated between the crew and guests.... If you have the same 5 guys hugging the trolling reels, then 21 guests will not have a chance to catch....probably I will take a YFT home that was not caught by me (dont taste the same IMO)... and this is what happend during the trip.

The reality is that this is a business and sometimes it must be seen as such. The trip is not about you or the crew, its about the guests. Safety, like you mentioned, is a responsibility. Sometimes is fishing and not catching, but the captain communication is crucial when this happens. I been on some trips that were about the crew instead of the guests. Crew members fishing instead of helping. I was on one trip were the crew were very busy doing 'other' stuff that I would rather not mention, than doing their job and ensuring everyone was safe. But, the jar was still passed out at the end and the trip was still over 400 dlls. On that very first trip, a deckhand yelled at me aggressively because I did not know that I had to place my thumb in the spool to release to prevent a birds nest. He did not know that was the first time I handled a reel, it was not his fault, but there are different ways to approach this situations. Seek to understand before to be understood. Again, this is a business and if we dont realize that, then we will be disappointed over and over again. It is not "entitlement" to the service, but again the company its taking my money, it is an exchange for a good reasonable service, and that is expected. People boarding before me, when I paid first, after knowing company rewards those who paid first, is unacceptable. The captain not communicating with the guests accordingly is unacceptable.

You, as a captain always catered to those needs and for them to have an epic trip/safe trip, I am just disappointed that you feel that way about your experience as a captain, you are my role model for fishing. I wish you can come back one day to the business to mentor more captains on difficult situations like my trip and how to organize a new plan, and most importantly how to care for your guests.

Again, thank you captain for what you believe was a small gesture, for me, it changed my life.
 

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Well , from time to time, being a rambling drunk,with insomnia catches me up, and I look like an asshole. Although, I stand by everything i said, the delivery, tact, and badgering should all be adjusted. As well, some of my stronger terminology (entitled) is facetious to drive a point.

This is my 6th or 7th attempt at replying, but I just get drawn back into my own head, and ramble. So I'll concede one point, but also counter with a slightly different perspective. If there truly was any specific favoritism, then you are right to be miffed. However, if the same 5 guys just remained standing there for 2 hours , actually doing nothing, just like everyone else, it sounds more like a combination of a very bad fishing session, combined with an oversight (they happen often when stressed and freaking out about hour trip showing signs of busting) by the crew of not forcing an alternative rotation to replace the lack of hookups. And creating an artificial feeling of participation. When every one still all remain inactive, just as before, but now with purpose!

I was not there , so cannot say.

Thank you for your kind words, and yes while the multitudes all blur together and details disappear completely, As soon as your original post mentioned driving from Mexico, I remembered your group.

Thank you for the kind words. It is touching. To avoid being destroyed by hubris, having to eat some serious crow, from time to time, is just one of those discomforting effects of being who I am.
 

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We, three friends and I, scheduled to our annual tuna run for November 23 out of Dolphin Docks in Port Aransas. I live in Mexico and I look forward to make this trip every year with my brother. It is our time together away from the daily stress and routine, we have this tradition for the past 15 years. This time around, I had two good friends that wanted to make their first tuna trip. Unfortunately, my brother and a friend could not make the trip last minute due to work projects. This was my 11th 24-40 hrs. trip and as every trip before, I started prepping the equipment 3 months in advanced for four people. New penn slammer 6500hs, valiant 800, seigler lgn, saragosa 20K, saragosa 25K, slow pitch jigs, strikertackle jigs, halcos 190 and 220, fall flats, and other goodies were prepped to make this trip. We started driving from Mexico (Piedras Negras Coahuila) around 8 pm and arrived in Port Aransas around 12:30 am. We had our last meal at “W” and arrived at DD to wait for our ride “La Pesca”. As we waited, I explained last minute jigging techniques and boat layout to my friend. Several familiar faces were between the boat crew and guests.

At 2:45 am, the deckhands made an announcement I never heard before “please get in line to get your bunk beds”. I hurried to get in line and be as in front possible, but unfortunately did not get a bottom bunk bed. Originally, I was number four and my friend number five to board. We always reserve and pay our ticket as soon as possible to enjoy the benefit of choosing a good bunk bed away from the engine noise and diesel smell; this time, DD did not honor the monetary commitment. Then, the deckhands made us get off La Pesca again to bring our fishing equipment aboard. This time around, we were able to secure good spots. Finally, for the third time the deckhands made us get off the boat again. The captain called us to instruct about safety before parting. I was personally very impressed and happy with the captain comments and commitment: “I am going to play it safe, we are going to Perdido. There are very few reports of YFT being caught on other rigs. We will return until 7 pm on Sunday instead of 5 pm. I don’t want to miss the morning trolling window”. We boarded for the third time and off to a ten-hour nap.

We arrived at our fishing spot around 3:30 pm. It was about one and a half hour before our expected arrival time of 5 pm. I immediately saw the platform and did not recognized it as Perdido. I pulled out my satellite phone/GPS and checked the coordinates…to my surprise it was not Perdido. We trolled for about 2 hours and only caught one 60lbs yft. At this point, several guest were upset at the fact that only five people out of 26 were fishing. At around 6 pm, the captain set up for the first drift, I caught my first blackfin tuna in a pink strikertackle deep drop jig. The deckhand shamefully said to me that the captain told them that the first blackfin tunas caught were going to be bait for YFT. No one else caught anything during the first drift. We drifted several times for about one hour and very few blackfin funa were caught. Then the captain made a terrible announcement: “I cannot do this all night, I am going to do a Hail Mary and go to Perdido at this time. It is about 30 miles away. Take a nap”. All guests that were next to me thought we were at Perdido already. I checked my GPS one more time, and to my dismay, Perdido was 63 miles away from our location. We started our trip to Perdido around 8 pm.

Around 10 pm our engines went silent, I checked my watch and I thought to myself “wow we made good time”. Unfortunately, we had a fuel leak and we had to stop for about 45 minutes to get it fixed. We finally arrived to Perdido a little before 12 am. The captain made a few passes around the rig to spot fish and then said again “we are going three miles to away to a drill boat to check it”. We spent the night making these runs between the two rigs, which each trip took about 5 minutes each. I was able to catch 4 blackfin tunas, one of which was eaten by a barracuda due to tangled lines. My friend caught three blackfin tunas. Between all the guests, 13 yft tunas were caught. Biggest yft caught was 60 lbs (on the troll) and the rest were under 40 lbs. We totaled about 30 blackfin tunas between all the boat. YFT were caught on jigs and one with a halco. Around 5.15 am the captain decided to troll again for another two hrs. Again, his efforts did not produced any fish. Halfway the trip back, La Pesca had fuel problems again and we lost about an hour. We finally arrived to PA around 7:30 pm. Seas were calmed as I never seen before.

Our captain is learning his new trade; he opted to move to a different rig that cost us half of the fishing time; we fished for about 6 hours in a 36 hrs trip. We spent close to 30 hrs moving. We made a plan, changed it, and then realized it did not work and changed it again. The captain at some point started yelling to the guests: “guys, take your hands out of your a$$”. In my opinion, this is uncalled for when you are fishing with people that are 70 – 80 years old. The young captain tried his best to get to fish, but missed the whole point in what is to charter for people, to cater to your guests, and to be patient and stick to your plan. I have learned that in this trips that bite turns on or off in the blink of an eye, but you have to stay on the spot if you are marking fish. By moving that much, we missed that window. I still feel Dolphin Docks is the best company to charter your fishing trips. I have enjoyed each one of them.

This trip made me realize that these trips are not about fishing, but spending time together finding more about yourself and the people that are around you. I did not know my friend was going through a rough time and he needed this trip to get away and clear his head. I met an 80-year-old gentleman that enjoys the trips more than anybody even though he has to carry his oxygen supply to breath. A fellow angler that has been in the same trips as me for the past three years recognized me and I did not even knew is name before. I learned that patience is a virtue that few people have and that fishing is not about the fish, but the company and the patience to understand that fishing is like this.
I remember this trip, and I remember you my friend!
 
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