Does a frozen fsh lose or gain weight?

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by tmd, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. tmd

    tmd Large Member

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    If you weigh a fish shortly after it dies, then leave it for a full night in a freezer then weigh it again. will it have gained or lose weight?

    thanks you
     
  2. SpecialK

    SpecialK Super Moderator

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    I had a snapper weigh 21 lbs on a certified scale and then weigh 14 after 24+- hours on ice. I would say they lose weight. I guess from blood loss.
     

  3. Striperslayer

    Striperslayer Member

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    fish will gain weight overtime if u leave them in water after they r dead
     
  4. SpecialK

    SpecialK Super Moderator

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    fish will gain weight overtime if u leave them in water after they r dead
    What if they are just on ice i.e. not sitting it a puddle of water?
     
  5. High Seas Drifter

    High Seas Drifter Junior member

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    I had a snapper weigh 21 lbs on a certified scale and then weigh 14 after 24+- hours on ice. I would say they lose weight. I guess from blood loss.

    You already cut the fillets off too right?
     
  6. SpecialK

    SpecialK Super Moderator

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    You already cut the fillets off too right?
    Nope, it was like it shrank...
     
  7. tmd

    tmd Large Member

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    anyone else wants to shed ligt on this?
     
  8. chf1949

    chf1949 Senior Member

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    basically, it dried out. when in the water the fish sees a humidity of 100%. out of water the humidity is much less, thus it dries out.

    an extreme example is this... you wrap and seal fish/food when freezing,,, why? to keep it from drying out over time....

    even when freezing food, do you ever notice ice or ice crystals forming in the bags? the frozen item is loosing moisture/water, and the moisture the food lost is condensing inside the bag, and freezing. the only place the moisture is coming from is the food in the bag.... thus, the food (fish?) is drying out.

    in the case described it could be a combination of blood loss (mostly water), water loss (water in the gut/stomach due to the retrieve may have drained out), and drying out.

    makes one wonder why when weighing the fishies at tournaments they tie them up 'tail high' when weighing......

    striperslayer... correct... the fish is 'oversaturated'. if totally immersed, the fish will absorb more water than it would normally retain in normal bodily fuctions. water will make its way into the cell structures and body cavities where it would not normally be found, thus adding weight.