Conventional or Spinning

Discussion in 'Tackle and Rigging' started by LoLoBeF, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. LoLoBeF

    LoLoBeF Junior member

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    Hi...

    I have a question. I couldn't decide which type of reel to take.
    The main problem is the price of the reel.

    I just use spinning reel (daiwa bg90) for fishing tarpon and other species in south America. But this reel isn't so good versus big fishes, i broke a few of them.

    A salesperson told me that it will better to use a conventional reel because under 200$ you can buy one with better drag and reliability than a spinning reel at the same price.
    I love popping and i don't know if a conventional reel will fit to my needs.

    My dream it's to get a stella/saltiga but it's definitely out of my budget.

    Is it harder to use conventional reel than spinning ones? Can I throw and use my poppers with a conventional reel?
    Is it better for me to take a conventional reel other a spinning one for my needs (under 200$, using 80-100lb line, poppers, and lots of drag)?
     
  2. papio

    papio Senior Member

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    Black Gold is still around? I thought they were obsolete. No wonder u broke a few. Check out the Spheros, Spinfisher SSM, Boca PT, Cabo PT. All are decent reels and in your price range.

    Spinning all the way brah!!! Hana pa'a!!!
     

  3. LoLoBeF

    LoLoBeF Junior member

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    I'd love to buy the spheros but like I said in my other (reel section), I have changed my mind.
    So now I would consider Conventional reels...
     
  4. Pescador

    Pescador Member

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    Go with the BG90, and get spares for the bits that you break.
    That way you can save your $s and when you've got enough get yourself a Diawa Z6500Exp.
    Japans gift to the future of fishing.
     
  5. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    If you are casting from shore your better off with a conventional, you'll find the long distance caster use them and consistantly out cast spinners.
     
  6. LoLoBeF

    LoLoBeF Junior member

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    Try to give me brand and model please.
    It will help me in finding information.
     
  7. Pescador

    Pescador Member

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    When the BG90 first came out a guy in the UK took one from a shop, loaded it with mono and broke the UK casting record - straight off!

    I could be wrong but aren't ALL the long distance casting records held by spinners (aka:eggbeaters,fixed spools,etc)?

    Just put a drop of washing up soap on the reel line, compress the rod correctly, and stand well back.
     
  8. PiePuncher

    PiePuncher Senior Member

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    If I am not mistaken, the long distance casting record is held by a penn 525. Spinners do not cast as far as the casting reels.
     
  9. Sportfisherman

    Sportfisherman Senior Member

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    If I am not mistaken, the long distance casting record is held by a penn 525. Spinners do not cast as far as the casting reels.

    Spinning is easier to cast , anyone can do it but when comes to casting tournament , yes the conventional reel will outcast spinning reel .

    With spinning reel , the line comes out in coil rubbing the circumference of the guides hence creating friction while on the conventional reel , the line comes out in a straight line and less frictions are encountered .

    Jon .
     
  10. Ragman

    Ragman Moderator

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    Spinning is easier to cast , anyone can do it but when comes to casting tournament , yes the conventional reel will outcast spinning reel .

    With spinning reel , the line comes out in coil rubbing the circumference of the guides hence creating friction while on the conventional reel , the line comes out in a straight line and less frictions are encountered .

    Jon .

    Exactly Jon!

    Additionally, on a conventional, you have the inertia created by a rotating spool, rather than just line coming off of a spin-reel, fixed spool.

    For most people though, spin reel is a lot easier to fish with efficiently during a trip.
     
  11. Bellyups

    Bellyups Senior Member

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    Well, my next 2 set ups will be my go to reels for casting, and they will likely be a stella 20000 and a stella 8000 or Cabo 80. My reasons are that they are faster, more powerful, and I can cast them more consistantly and farther than my conventional reels. If accuracy is more important than distance, then I may opt for my conventional set ups.

    IMO, the high end spinning reels are hard to beat (except in price). They are smooth, powerful, and you don't have to worry about a backlash in the middle of a bite. For me, conventional reels are hard to cast into the wind and in the dark. I am sure I can cast most lures farther with a quality spinner than a conventional reel. Combine 45 plus pounds of drag (I think 65 with the stella 20000) with a 50 pound class rod, 80-100 pound spectra, and 40-48 inch line retrieve per crank and that fish is in trouble.

    I don't know much about long range casting, but I assume they use rods much longer than 7 feet. If they do, then the rotating loops effect on line drag as the line passes through the guides is a lot more pronounced than it would be on a 7 foot topwater spinning rod.

    If you prefer conventional, I have a very nice setup with a torium 30 and a blue steel seeker CJBF 65 H (It is 7 feet long) custom rod that I will sell to you for a good price. It has caught many yellowfins to 118 pounds and has been a great setup. I just want to pick up a stella.
     
  12. Ragman

    Ragman Moderator

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    I'm with you Scott!

    I used to be conventional for pelagic popping, but after using the Stella, the conventional demands so much more effort, especially on night 2 at 4 a.m. in a 3'-5' pitching boat!

    You will love the 8000!

    The long-casters are using highly specialized gear intended to do one thing extremely, cast out of sight.

    LoLoBeF- going by your requirements, you'd be better off to go with conventional.

    There are many conventional reels that you can cast -you'll have to put in practice time- poppers weighing up to 120g, on a 7'-8' rod and catch fish.
     
  13. Deep_Sea_Gull

    Deep_Sea_Gull Lifetime Supporting Members

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    I can dang sure cast and fish a baitcaster. I often need to throw accross three generators in the tailrace where I stripe fish near home.

    I am through using an overhead reel for jigging offshore. (I already use a spinner for popping).

    WHHHHHYYYY???? you queary?

    I backlashed a nice conventional reel while tossing a 7 oz jig. The momentum snatched the rod out of my grasp. Bye, bye....

    It was my fault. I allowed the spool too much freedom. I was not at my peak alertness. Lack of sleep on multiple day trips... WHATEVER...

    I watched others use spinning rigs with deadly efficiency for the remainder of the trip. Randy loaned me one of his rigs so that I could judge for myself. I am sold.

    I will be tossing my jigs and poppers from spinning rods and reels. The gear is up to the task. Maybe this caveman can do it...
     
  14. Bellyups

    Bellyups Senior Member

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    Tom, you and I think alike!! I had the same perspective and I now have decided to eat my casting pride and I will buy a spinner when I can.

    I reread LoLoBeF's initial post and he is in my position. He wants a spinner but the cost is prohibitive. My advice would be to consider a torium 20 or 30 (or even a saltist by Daiwa. The trinidad 40 is another great reel but pricey) and decent rod for now ( I have a fiberglass Seeker BSC 6470 which is a great rod for about $175) and then pick up the spinner and custom rod when the budget allows. At that time, you can use the torium for a jigging setup.

    Another consideration would be the Quantum Cabo 80. It is not a Stella, but it is a nice reel. Maybe someone with a Cabo 80 can give their opinion.
     
  15. fishordie

    fishordie Senior Member

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    Yo Lolo,

    Since I have fished poppers on big fish for many years now I constantly get asked, especially by Asian fishermen, why I still use conventionals for both teaching and my own casting.

    My Answer is always the same. I have taught/coached all kinds of sports for many years. The one truth that always comes through regardless of the activity is to learn the basics. Even for those who become advanced should things go to heck in a handbasket and the ball wont drop or ?? GO BACK TO THE BASICS.

    In fishing, being in touch with the line, as it relates to the action/bend of the rod and ultimately with the bait at the end of your line, regardless if it is artificial or live, through all phases of the fishing cycle is of utmost importance. The results of correct casting techniques are immediately evident as the result is a great cast. Casting a conventional requires more of that feel and touch in order to cast a light or heavy jig or bait. As that artificial sinks or has action on the surface the fisherman can still "feel" the action of the lure as well as the hit of a fish especially on the sink. I believe, though there may be some who disagree (Is that really possible??), that the conventionals have superiority in this regard.

    Yes, for beginners who are satisfied being a marginal fisherman and getting some immediate gratification a spinner is a great way to go but I really believe you are shorting yourself on learning the "feel" of fishing. Of course for the advanced fisherman a spinner is a fantastic way to go but that same fisherman will have already paid his/her dues and has already learned to "feel".

    In my opinion those who learn to feel their lures/bait will always have a big edge on those who do not. Like anything else, practicing with a conventional or a spinner when not on the boat can only increase your ability to fish. I even recommend taking a video camera to the park with you and watch your casting technique. If you don't know what to compare it to Inside Sportfishing has a great teaching tool made by Two of the best skippers out of San Diego that go into wonderful basics of how to cast a conventional. That one video at around 20 bucks is worth its weight in gold for those itching to cast better and further.

    Just my three cents.

    Jamie