Colour and lenght of jigs and poppers?

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by Adrianw, Dec 16, 2008.

  1. Adrianw

    Adrianw Junior member

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    Ok, does it really matter? I mean, what colour to use on what situation or condition for these lures? There are tons of colours out there. Is it true to use bright colours for overcast weather? And dark colours for sunny day? How about the size? Longer is better? :D
    Going to fish YFT in Bali in few days time, not sure about the size there as this is my first trip targeting 'them', maybe 80lbs range.
    Any input will be very much appreciated.

    Tight lines!

    Adrian
     
  2. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    You got it reversed. Bright colors on sunny days and dark colors on overcast days or fishing at night. If the water is murky, use darker colors. Dark colors help fish see the lure more easily in these situations. I think this rule applies to most situations when fishing artificials, but with poppers I think the action is most important. Throw what you like best.
     

  3. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    You got it reversed. Bright colors on sunny days and dark colors on overcast days or fishing at night. If the water is murky, use darker colors. Dark colors help fish see the lure more easily in these situations. I think this rule applies to most situations when fishing artificials, but with poppers I think the action is most important. Throw what you like best.
    I agree with Pop.
    I prefer dark color at night. When I fish shallow, I like to use bright color like white or chatreuse and I use red, blue or purple when I fish deep.
    We love to use teasers when cod jgging in deep and we know what color works better as we usually fish 30 - 40 jig fishermen together. 90 percent of jig fishermen use dark colors.
     
  4. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    Man I wish we had cod. I love to eat cod....Mmmm Cod!
     
  5. Adrianw

    Adrianw Junior member

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    Many thanks guys. So what depth consider 'deep'? Say 50M? Anyway, dark colours for night?? How do fishes locate these jigs in the dark? Know there are luminous jigs out in the market. Just curious, I'm not in night fishing for this trip.
    Will it wind in better result as in catch rate to use luminous jigs in deeper waters? As deeper the water the less light it goes.

    Thanks again.
     
  6. kidflex

    kidflex Senior Member

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    glow jigs work sometimes and sometimes they don't. fish are used to feeding in low to no light conditions. they use other senses to feed. they can feel the movement of the jig. for top water lures i use darker colors at night because all the fish see is a silhouette. for jigging in deep waters is use a jig with alot of action and alot of flash. its a confidence thing. most of the time for alot of species, when people on a boat are all using different lures and colors and their all still catching.
     
  7. NEMO

    NEMO Member

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    OTI Komodo/Nemo, morning and night and in any condition of the weather.
     
  8. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    Silouettes are the key to fishing with dark colors in dark conditions. The dark colors contrast more easily against what available light there is. This is why baitfish have white bellies. The light colored bellies do not contrast against the surface (predators below).
     
  9. Adrianw

    Adrianw Junior member

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    Thanks Pope, I got what you mean. Think it's just a cosmetic effect to human eyes rather than fish for those fancy colours on poppers... :rolleyes:

    Tight lines!
     
  10. Bazztex

    Bazztex Senior Member

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    A couple of weeks ago when we fished the Scat Cat we were catching YFT on Chart Glow Williamson Benthos 7oz Jigs when the Moon was up and same jigs in Pink Glow when the Moon set.. they also hit the Pink Jigs after Sun Up till about noon with cloudy conditions. We were catching the YFT on jigs from 250 down to 400ft just below the BFT. They were 350 t0 480ft after Sun Up.

    They were also Picky on Top water Popper baits that trip.. the YFT wanted a Blue or Green back bait and a White belly got the most bites..

    I threw the traditional dark colored Black Purple Popper baits with little results except a fw BFT. It's a good idea for several folks to use something different and let the Tuna tell you what color and size baits they want.

    Good Luck and Keep On Casting!

    Bazz :D
     
  11. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    A couple of weeks ago when we fished the Scat Cat we were catching YFT on Chart Glow Williamson Benthos 7oz Jigs when the Moon was up and same jigs in Pink Glow when the Moon set.. they also hit the Pink Jigs after Sun Up till about noon with cloudy conditions. We were catching the YFT on jigs from 250 down to 400ft just below the BFT. They were 350 t0 480ft after Sun Up.

    They were also Picky on Top water Popper baits that trip.. the YFT wanted a Blue or Green back bait and a White belly got the most bites..

    I threw the traditional dark colored Black Purple Popper baits with little results except a fw BFT. It's a good idea for several folks to use something different and let the Tuna tell you what color and size baits they want.

    Good Luck and Keep On Casting!
    Bazz :D
    The best color is what works best on a particular situation.
    I generally start with what I like and change colors based on what others do.
     
  12. Rottweiler22

    Rottweiler22 Member

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    Like all creatures fish have rods and cones in their eyes. Rods for low light and cones for bright light. Rods are not able to decern color.
    Here is an interesting article about how fish see. Swordfish and bigeye tuna are color blind. Makes sence, they mainly feed at depth or at night.
    http://www.lizardislandgfc.asn.au/doc/colorblind.pdf

    Here is another short but not so good read, but it states that skipjack tuna and frigate mackeral are both probably color blind and have the highest sensitivity to blue and green wave lenths.
    http://rms1.agsearch.agropedia.affrc.go.jp/contents/JASI/pdf/society/05-3460.pdf
     
  13. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Scientists say fish are color blind, but fishermen know fish can sense color differeneces even in deep. :)
     
  14. workin

    workin Member

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    Hey,

    All colors fade to gray given enough depth. Red goes first, followed by yellow at around 20 ft, and by around 60 feet everything looks like an I Love Lucy re-run - you can't really tell she's a red-head. I think the fish can differentiate the different shades of gray, but I think it's more about light vs. dark than about the actual color.
     
  15. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    Fish aren't know for having high IQ's. It's a jungle out there, and their goal is to eat and hide. If your marking fish on a finder, and they are being picky about what they will hit, it's because they are full or you are way off on the size of jig that simulates the bait they are feeding on at the moment.

    In darkness (100' and below) they use their sense of smell and their lateral line to detect things to eat. That lateral line also tells them when to turn and avoid something larger in pursuit of eating you. The lateral line is eyes for the blind.

    A jig that gives off a sound wave or moves the water similar to what they are feeding on will attract strikes. Color doesn't make any difference in deep water. I believe that the hammered jig creates a slight different motion of water movement over the smooth one. I think it simulates water movement similar to scales on a fish.
     
  16. papio

    papio Senior Member

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    Concur Mrbill, commotion in the ocean attract the fishes. And as one fishing scholar once said, "Any color will work as long as it's white."