Cedar plug expierment

Discussion in 'Tackle and Rigging' started by Mitchw123456, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. Mitchw123456

    Mitchw123456 Senior Member

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    I have always loved using cedar plugs as I think that just about anything that swims will hit them. My dad and I started a little expierementing today and we wanted a little feedback on what everyone thought. Here are a couple pics of some unfinished ones, the painted ones are still drying. I have a feeling we're going to have to swap types of paint as I do not think regular old latex paint is going to stick well to the lead (or at least it didn't on the snapper jiggs me made but they were dipped vs air brushed) I'm 99% sure we're going to have to use a different type of paint. Also we intentionally made this first batch a little heavier which these weight around 10oz. Comments/suggestions? thanks..

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  2. Pope

    Pope Senior Member

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    You could use bottom paint. Naked cedar plugs are great too.
     

  3. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    Get an epoxy type paint for Barlows.
     
  4. Ragman

    Ragman Moderator

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    Great looking shape there Mitch! I too like CP's and found some on close out from some online tackle store, bought a lot of them!

    I'm experimenting with adding color/design to lures with permanent markers. Sharpie brand makes a lot of size pens and a lot of colors too.

    You don't get quite as clear of transfer of color as paint, but it's real quick.

    Are you an Airbrush user? If so, you can really create life-like colors and designs.

    I suggest adding as many coats of clear coat as you want to harden the finish.

    Whatever kind of wood you're using, I suggest stabilizing the wood before you begin applying finish. The easiest way is to kiln dry, but you can also find injectable resins or some other chemical that will solidify the plug and make it so that it will not absorb/retain water.

    This keeps the wood from cracking, or expanding/shrinking during and after usage.

    Post pics as you go!
     
  5. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    Mitch,
    The best working cedar plugs are from salt cedar in the Carolinia's. Don't ask me why, just some thing I picked up researching them. The natural color of the cedar was better than painted.
     
  6. Mitchw123456

    Mitchw123456 Senior Member

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    thanks for the info guys.. I've been playing around with various shapes sizes and weights. I still am running in the same problem though. Everything is nice and smooth when I pull it off the lathe but as soon as water touches it it absorbs and becomes very course and grainy again. I was considering trying to add some type of sealer; maybe a deck sealant of some sort? So far I've used a couple different types of oak, some pecan, and even some cedar. So far the easiest to work with was the cheap oak dowels from Lowes (and its much easier on the trees around the house)

    I do have an air brush but I am not going to say I'm very good with it at all. I've been searching for awhile tonight on where to pick up some more suitable paint but so far I haven't been too successful. I'll post of some more when I figure it ut and get things painted. It will prolly be awhile as I start graveards tomorrow night...
     
  7. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    I suggest that you look at some of the woodworking forums.
    Wood always fuzzes when the first coat is applied, just steelwoll it off, then prime and paint.
     
  8. Ragman

    Ragman Moderator

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    At OTI, we're using stabilized birch wood for our top water lures.

    On the "wood industry" hardness scale, our birch tests to a 41 compared to cypress which tests to a 37.

    Until you stabilize the wood, meaning to remove ALL moisture as in a kiln or other method that dry's out the wood, you'll see inconsistencies.

    This may not be a big deal to you, just thought I'd let you know so you could manage your expectations.

    As an aside, almost all MLB players with equipment contracts with bat mfrs, have their bats kiln dried before they receive them. This process puts the bat in its "hardest" state.
     
  9. SkeeterRonnie

    SkeeterRonnie Senior Member

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    use the powder coat paint on the leadhead, and leave the bare wood(after you harden and seal it). Powder paint is VERY easy.. just heat the object and dip it in the powder.. pull it out, the powder then melts and hardens.
     
  10. Mitchw123456

    Mitchw123456 Senior Member

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    just how hot do these kilns run? As in is this something I could fabricate up relaltively easily or just use the oven? As for the powder I may give that a shot as a guy has already offered to coat them for me for a few plugs. We started out doing this just for grins but learned we could make around 25-30 an hour once everything is set up so we may make a few extras and slap em on ebay just to see what happens. It has come apparent though that I do have to figure out how to dry them out, without catching them on fire.....
     
  11. jig

    jig Senior Member

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    maybe try the old home-made incubator: a cardboard box with a light bulb in it (such as a trouble light). It can get plenty hot; I cooked more than one easter chick that way as a kid! Just don't let the light touch the cardboard, or it will catch on fire. I have heard of people making jerky driers the same way by lining the box with foil.
     
  12. MrBill

    MrBill Senior Member

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    There is an art to kiln drying. Every species of wood drys differently. The whole idea to remove the moisture from the green (fresh cut) wood without cracking it. If you remove the moisture to quickly it will crack and loose it's integrity. If the cedar you are using was bought at a hardwood lumber yard or Lowe's, etc., it has been kilned dried.

    If you went outside and cut the cedar off a tree before you turned it, it is very green. Green wood turns better than dried wood. But, it will warp as it dries. If you are turning it green, oversize it and let it air dry. Be patient, it takes 1 year per inch. In other words, if you cut down a mesquite tree, have it sliced into lumber at a mill 2 inches thick, it will be ready to use in two years if you have sticked it. Sticking means placing a dry piece of wood perpendicular to the green wood every few feet. The purpose of sticking is to let the air get to both sides of the green wood.

    Putting the wood into your oven would be tricky. 150 degrees is the highest temp the green wood could take before cracking. It also would take about a week for your cedar plugs to dry. Putting wax on the end grain helps retard the drying process. It also keeps it from drying out to fast.

    There are a lot of varieties of cedar. Western Cedar is the one you see going on fences. Lowe's and Home Depot sell western cedar. It is commonly used to trim out exterior door frames and facia trim along the roof rafters. It should be plenty dry for your plugs.