BX2-600 w/ What Rod For East Coast Jigging???

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by Sea Bear, Mar 27, 2009.

  1. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    Hey guys first time posting here...

    I'm pretty much set on picking up a BX2-600 for east coast style tuna jigging this year on party boats in the northeast. I think I'll have it set up with 80LB Spectra to 60LB mono leader. I'm looking for something in the 7' range either all glass or composite. I'm already aware of the Calstar 700H/700XH but personally I would prefer something more parabolic. Any recommendations??? I've come across the Seeker CJBF70H/XH on the internet and they seem like possibilities but haven't checked them out anywhere so I really don't know much about them. Can anyone offer input? Thanks.
     
  2. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    i have an OTI 7'6" 80lb 2 piece jigging rod and like it so far. very strong rod. it is the popping rod wrapped conventional (to my knowledge). if you travel at all to fish (or have a small car) this is very nice.

    i am hopefully fishing for bluefin next friday if i can get guys and a boat, and will bring this rod to try on them. if it can handle them, itll handle your canyon yellows (im from PA, fished the canyons for a long time)

    also check st croix blanks. they are very very light.
     

  3. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    I did look at the St Croix PM79XXXHF. Very light and powerful it seemed. I only worry because its all graphite and I'm often "loaning" my gear to my father, the GF, some of my friends...all less than "experienced" offshore fisher(wo)man.

    I'm really interested in pullin' on those seekers...
     

  4. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    yeah i mean id be worried about railing the st croix as well bc of how light it is.

    i think seeker blanks will work OK.

    you really might want to look at the OTIs. It is extremely light and handles 25lbs drag no problem.
     
  5. fishordie

    fishordie Senior Member

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    That Seeker CJBF70XH is a beast. I LOOOOVE it but I fish up to 100 pound test on it. The H Version is also a wonderful combination. That reel matches up beautifully with either version of the Super Seeker.

    Jamie
     
  6. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    That Seeker CJBF70XH is a beast. I LOOOOVE it but I fish up to 100 pound test on it. The H Version is also a wonderful combination. That reel matches up beautifully with either version of the Super Seeker.

    Jamie

    fishordie - which seeker do you think would be best for 18-20lbs of drag as that's what i'll be using. i hear that the black steel cjbf70h is a great 50lb stick so im presumably thinking the cjbf70xh would work well at 60lb??? i think i'll just stick with black steel as long as I find it suitable. anyone know anywhere in the NJ tri-state area that I can find these blanks to pull on??
     
  7. Sea Crappie

    Sea Crappie Senior Member

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    If you want something parabolic, the St Croix PM79XXXHF probably isn't what you're looking for.
     
  8. peterk814

    peterk814 Senior Member

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    cant really go wrong with the 700H. If you want something more parabolic and can go custom get a calstar 900M cut 12 inches from the tip, or a seeker csb909 cut 12 inches from the tip
     
  9. nxtbgctch

    nxtbgctch Senior Member

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    I kind of wondering the same thing. What are the options for something parabolic around that length?
     
  10. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    I kind of wondering the same thing. What are the options for something parabolic around that length?

    exactly why i'm asking if theres something out there
     
  11. paul708

    paul708 Site Sponsor

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    fishordie - which seeker do you think would be best for 18-20lbs of drag as that's what i'll be using. i hear that the black steel cjbf70h is a great 50lb stick so im presumably thinking the cjbf70xh would work well at 60lb??? i think i'll just stick with black steel as long as I find it suitable. anyone know anywhere in the NJ tri-state area that I can find these blanks to pull on??
    i am in pa, just off rt 95 over the jersey bridges. stop by i have OTI blanks and rods brett is talking about.
    i just cut the tip off of a 909 so you can see that.
    i have the SS blanks
    for 18-20# of drag the calstar 700h is nice.
    i have a few of the 7 and 8' rods i use for eastcoast style.
    for shorter rods the Vjigging blanks from mudhole/amtac are nice.
     
  12. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Hey guys first time posting here...

    I'm pretty much set on picking up a BX2-600 for east coast style tuna jigging this year on party boats in the northeast (checked it out at the somerset expo and LOVED it). I think I'll have it set up with 80LB Spectra to 60LB mono leader. I'm looking for something in the 7' range either all glass or composite. I'm already aware of the Calstar 700H/700XH but personally I would prefer something more parabolic. Any recommendations??? I've come across the Seeker CJBF70H/XH on the internet and they seem like possibilities but haven't checked them out anywhere so I really don't know much about them. Can anyone offer input? Thanks.
    If you want light finesse blanks, go with St Croix 7'6" 4M76XHF. I have a few 8' Cosmotech blanks rated to 80 lbs but I don't sell those blanks. I found the ST Croix blank is as good an my favorite Japanese Cosmotech blank.
    I landed a few 120 lbs range with the custom St. Croix rod and fought three bluefin, probably over 200 lbs, with the rod for a while yesterday and I felt the rod could handle big tuna unless you don't bang the rod againg hard objects.

    I experiment for conventional jigging with shorter rods and I see some advantage with it. First you can do conventional jigging as well as Japanese jigging. Second you can use heavier reels for extended time with shorter rods. I asked my rod builders to build custom tuna jigging rods with full lengh of JM Power Spell (5'8") for the same reasons listed above for my customers.

    I suggest not to use 60 lbs topshop for tuna jigging. I use 80 lbs as a minimum
    unless they are line shy.
     
  13. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    paul - whats your address? i might be able to come down next weekend and take a look at what you've got.

    kil - i guess your right i could use an OTI or JM jigging style rod for hammered jigs as well, im just not sure if i want to do that on a party boat? I've had plenty of success with traditional hammered jigs on a heavy 7' glass rod and senator 114HLW and I don't feel overly compelled to tap into japanese style jigging at least for now. after all the newer lighter equipment has entered the market i'm looking to continue hammered style jigging i now just want an overall lighter setup, especially cause i'm a small guy and I can only use my current jiggin setup for so long before it becomes too tiring. as for 60 vs 80LB, well, I don't catch tuna as big as you ;)
     
  14. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    paul - whats your address? i might be able to come down next weekend and take a look at what you've got.

    kil - i guess your right i could use an OTI or JM jigging style rod for hammered jigs as well, im just not sure if i want to do that on a party boat? I've had plenty of success with traditional hammered jigs on a heavy 7' glass rod and senator 114HLW and I don't feel overly compelled to tap into japanese style jigging at least for now. after all the newer lighter equipment has entered the market i'm looking to continue hammered style jigging i now just want an overall lighter setup, especially cause i'm a small guy and I can only use my current jiggin setup for so long before it becomes too tiring. as for 60 vs 80LB, well, I don't catch tuna as big as you ;)
    I am tring to figure out what lengh of rod is optimal to use both Japanese style jigging and coventional style jigging.
    5'8" - 6' length could be a good choice.

    What kind of advantage do you think is to use 60 lbs leader lines for tuna jigging in crowded party boats ?
     
  15. JFLORES

    JFLORES Senior Member

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    I am tring to figure out what lengh of rod is optimal to use both Japanese style jigging and coventional style jigging.
    5'8" - 6' length could be a good choice.

    What kind of advantage do you think is to use 60 lbs leader lines for tuna jigging in crowded party boats ?


    Kil,

    I have been using my 5'6" Tuna Max for diamond jigging and also Japanese jigging and find its
    the perfect lenth to fight big fish and also work the jig affectivly.

    I find that tunas dont like that wild up and down jigging motion that
    lots of guys use with longer rods. IMO i think tunas like a more slower suductive motion when diamond jigging
     
  16. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    i used a jigging master 5'8" rod for slower jigging and its worked well for tuna. on a party boat its nicer to have a long rod around 7' as far as getting around lines and keeping the line away from the hull, but you can definitely slow jig with a short rod. if you move the rod tip 3' with a short or long rod - the jig still moves 3'. its just that because you have a longer lever with a long rod, you can move the tip more with the same movement in the butt section.
     
  17. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    What kind of advantage do you think is to use 60 lbs leader lines for tuna jigging in crowded party boats ?

    I know you fish on party boats like the Jamaica, where "crowded" is certainly part of the experience. I fish on the Sea Devil, 18 guys max, plenty of room to fish, FAR less tangles in my experience between fishing on each of the two boats, but to each his own. As far as 60LB, its is yet to fail me on 40-70LB tuna that account for 90% of the catch in the canyons, and you said yourself you got didn't get a bit fishing 150lb test on the bluefins but did at 80. so wouldn't it make since that 60 would get bit better than 80 too? especially when everyone else fishing next to me is always overgunned for those fish, using their 50W's and 80-100LB test. for all thats invested in offshore fishing, if i can give myself ANY advantage when i'm out there i'm going to take it, even if its a small advantage like using 60 over 80, knowing full well in the back of my mind that 60 is easily enough to subdue your typical canyon yellowfin.
     
  18. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    I know you fish on party boats like the Jamaica, where "crowded" is certainly part of the experience. I fish on the Sea Devil, 18 guys max, plenty of room to fish, FAR less tangles in my experience between fishing on each of the two boats, but to each his own. As far as 60LB, its is yet to fail me on 40-70LB tuna that account for 90% of the catch in the canyons, and you said yourself you got didn't get a bit fishing 150lb test on the bluefins but did at 80. so wouldn't it make since that 60 would get bit better than 80 too? especially when everyone else fishing next to me is always overgunned for those fish, using their 50W's and 80-100LB test. for all thats invested in offshore fishing, if i can give myself ANY advantage when i'm out there i'm going to take it, even if its a small advantage like using 60 over 80, knowing full well in the back of my mind that 60 is easily enough to subdue your typical canyon yellowfin.
    As you know, you never know what you catch next in canyons as you always have chance to hookp up swordfish, bigeye or nice bluefin.
    I never thought 80 lbs line are heavy for 40 - 70 lbs tuna. The longer you fight, the more you have chance to lose.
    There were only 2 - 3 times I went down to 60 lbs as I felt tuna were line shy during daytime bites in 25 years tuna jigging.
    Besides, once you crossed over other fighting line while fighting, you line get easily cut by stronger lines. That was main reason I didn't like soft lines like Jinkai when fishing on party boats during pre-braided line era as I lost too many tuna by other fishermen's lines when crossed while fighting.
    In my subjective opinion, there are more disadvantage than advantage to use 60 lbs over 80 lbs. for me it really doesn't matter whether you fish or a crowded party boat or a private boat.
    But it seems you know what you are doing.

    The Sea Devil was very nice and clean. It's beeen long time I fished tuna with Capt Bob Pennington on the Sea Deveil. In fact, we drove down together on a chartered bus to fish on a chartered overnight trip on the Continental Shelf out of Moreheard City, NC in 20 - 25 years ago.
     
  19. Sea Bear

    Sea Bear Senior Member

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    i hear ya Kil and I value your opinion, i guess we can agree to disagree ;)

    without trying to sound like im the best fisherman since sliced bread, in the last 3 seasons on the sea devil i have fought over a dozen tuna up to 125lb yellowfin and can honestly say I haven't been in a single tangle (i know, i know, but its really true). i know you like to fish your drags in a high setting, i actually beleive 15-20lbs of drag for canyon fishing is more practical and results in fewer tangles, reason being, if i have a freshly hooked fish that decides it wants to take off down the side of the boat where 10 lines are in the way, with lesser drag that 50lb yellowfin can make a STRAIGHT run, if i fish a heavier drag, the fish isn't powerful enough to peel line off for as long, and therefore it begins to circle instead of pulling out line, in circling, it it more likely to pick up other lines before i can move over/under and down the boat quick enough, with lighter drag i let the fish swim off straight in a given direction and allow me more time to "catch up" to my fish before it tires out and begins to move horizontally and thus crossing other lines, i learned this approach after spending 5 years working deck on a bluefish boat. when setting up rentals, we always fish a LOW drag, we figure the newby angler is just going to reel anyway the whole time, even against the drag (thats all they do when they have a fish on), and they dont move around quick enough to keep up with there fish. it turns out we ALWAYS had fewer tangles with a lesser drag setting because if we fished a higher drag the bluefish would swim more horizantally than vertically because they couldn't pull drag to move vertically, of course its the horizontal movement that crosses lines and makes tangles, this may all seem counter-intuitive, spending more time on a fish with lighter drag, but i beleive in it, and its been working for me, for whatever thats worth.

    for whatever else its worth, Capt. Bob Pennington adamantly opposes fishing a high drag as well, he even opposes the use of a scale to measure drag. as far as he is concerned, you should be able to peel the line off your reel with just a relatively moderate pull of your hand. they fish i'd say around 14-15lbs on there rental rods, i know that may seem light to some, but ive seen 200lb swordfish and 200lb bluefin come up on those rental rods, but of course it was after a very long fight :) but again, if those drags were at 24lbs, the tangles that would of ensued when an inexperienced angler couldn't keep up with their fish when it dragged then around the boat would have likely resulted in lost fish to begin with.

    of course, if i was all alone fighting a fish with no worries of tanlges then i have no problems increasing the drag and getting that fish into the boat :D
     
  20. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    As long as you know what you are doing and has been successful with it, there is no reasson to change it. Some Capt are adamant to use light drag. Capt Tim of the Cean Sweet who is an excellent Capt out of Cape May, likes to use 50 lbs o 60 lbs and chase everyfish hooked. :) As a jig fishermen I hate to chase a hooked fish. :)
    Heavier drag is not for anyone as you got to adjust tackles and terminal tackles accordingly. Guys like to use lighter lines are usually good fishermen, but I don't recommend beginners to use 50 - 60 lbs lines for tuna jigging as it causes more problems than answers. I have been successful with 80 lbs lines for jigging and that is what I tell other fishermen at my jigging seminars.