Best rod-style for halibut and cod?

Discussion in 'Tackle and Rigging' started by Wachtel, Aug 11, 2009.

  1. Wachtel

    Wachtel Member

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    I know this is a tuna forum but would welcome some advice on selecting a rod for another application.

    I live in Sweden but fish in northern Norway each summer, mainly targeting large Atlantic Cod and Halibut. I use a Torium 20 (with 30# PowerPro) and a 7'6" 30 lbs traditional jigging rod. My current PB's are Cod at 30 kg and Halibut at 26 kg, my goal is to better the latter :)

    When we're fishing in shallower water it would be a plus to be able to toss the lure some distance from the boat and jig it back. I've been reading a lot about popping and jigging with spinners abroad so I've decided to try spinning gear myself. I've ordered a Twinpower 10000FC.

    My dilemma is whether to get a popping rod or a jigging rod. I'm leaning towards getting a Jigwrex S605.

    All advice welcome!
     
  2. SteelingHeads

    SteelingHeads Senior Member

    731
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    I know this is a tuna forum but would welcome some advice on selecting a rod for another application.

    I live in Sweden but fish in northern Norway each summer, mainly targeting large Atlantic Cod and Halibut. I use a Torium 20 (with 30# PowerPro) and a 7'6" 30 lbs traditional jigging rod. My current PB's are Cod at 30 kg and Halibut at 26 kg, my goal is to better the latter :)

    When we're fishing in shallower water it would be a plus to be able to toss the lure some distance from the boat and jig it back. I've been reading a lot about popping and jigging with spinners abroad so I've decided to try spinning gear myself. I've ordered a Twinpower 10000FC.

    My dilemma is whether to get a popping rod or a jigging rod. I'm leaning towards getting a Jigwrex S605.

    All advice welcome!

    Hello Wachtel!

    There are a few Cod fishermen in the group here that also Tuna fish! For my Cod fishing I use all custom rods. Rods that have a lot more backbone (yet are light) specifically for working a 16 oz. jig in water up to 700 feet deep. It sounds though that what you are doing is quite a bit different. There are a lot of "fans" of OTI products (Ocean Tackle International) on this forum, and rightfully so. OTI builds an excellent product and really backs it up with their warranty and service. Their line of G3 Jigging rods (400 or 600 gr.) would fit quite nicely for what you are looking to do. Nothing wrong with the Jigwrex either. Take a look at Hopper rods as well. The only potential problem I see with the spinning type jig rods is they are shorter (5 1/2 or 6 feet) and I personally prefer a 8 foot rod for Cod jigging. Let us know what you decide on and how it works out for you. Post some Halibut pics for us too! Atlantic Halibut are so rare on our side of the pond that catching one would be like catching the Loch Ness Monster.
     

  3. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

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    Hello Watchel, welcome to the site! You should be in real good shape with with a 400-600g OTI jigging rod. The only problem you might have is when casting for long distance. If you're casting out alot you might want to check out one of the OTI 7'6" popping rods. I was codding earlier this year w/ a trevalla XXH spinner and it did not have enough backbone.
    I'm going to be giving Pacific Halibut a try with an OTI 600g spinner later this month, I'll be sure to let you know how it goes.
     
  4. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    You can use short jigging rods for cod and halibut, but you are better off with longer rods bouncing bottom. There are reasons why cod fishermen prefer 7'-8' jigging rods. As you know, there is no different technique between cod jigging and halibut jigging.
    I found OTI 7'6" rated to 80 lbs is perfect for cod/halibut jigging as well as grouper jigging. I even use it for tuna jigging. I brought OTI 7'6" custom two-piece conventional rod to Kodiak, Alaska last year and it performed beautifully for cod and halibut.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

    1,616
    79
    Hello Watchel, welcome to the site! You should be in real good shape with with a 400-600g OTI jigging rod. The only problem you might have is when casting for long distance. If you're casting out alot you might want to check out one of the OTI 7'6" popping rods. I was codding earlier this year w/ a trevalla XXH spinner and it did not have enough backbone.
    I'm going to be giving Pacific Halibut a try with an OTI 600g spinner later this month, I'll be sure to let you know how it goes.
    You may want to consider having a a rod built to better meet your specifications using one of OTI's awesome blanks. Check out JPR rods, I've seen JPR's work first hand and Paul can build you just about anything you need at a pretty affordable price. You can't beat the quality of his work either. I'm pretty sure he can ship internationally and I know he fishes Cod so he is well versed in the type of fishing you are doing over there. Paul also has a ton of different blanks as well, I'm sure he can hook you up! Flash Intro
     
  6. silky23

    silky23 Senior Member

    1,616
    79
    You can use short jigging rods for cod and halibut, but you are better off with longer rods bouncing bottom. There are reasons why cod fishermen prefer 7'-8' jigging rods. As you know, there is no different technique between cod jigging and halibut jigging.
    I found OTI 7'6" rated to 80 lbs is perfect for cod/halibut jigging as well as grouper jigging. I even use it for tuna jigging. I brought OTI 7'6" custom two-piece conventional rod to Kodiak, Alaska last year and it performed beautifully for cod and halibut.
    I'm looking into picking up one of those 7"6" poppers for my upcomming AK trip too, trying to figure out how to move the funds w/out my wife figuring out what I'm doing is going to be tricky :) . I think I saw one at Paul's shop last time I was there. Might have to make a lunchtime cheese steak run and pick one up at JPR.
     
    Chutiwit_Nantucket likes this.
  7. Wachtel

    Wachtel Member

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    Thanks for all your replies!

    Over here halibut and cod are caught in shallow waters also. Big fish have been caught in just 100 feet of water. We usually fish from 50-400 feet. My idea was to toss the jigg out, let it sink to the bottom and then use a "spin-sink" retrieve. This should also work well for cod and large pollack, also a nice gamefish in these waters.

    It's always nice to try something out of the ordinary :D

    The OTI rods look great! Sadly, the exchange rate right now is not favourable for me so an import from the US would cost me plenty. I will probably have to buy from the UK.
     
  8. lordhell

    lordhell Moderator

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    You can use short jigging rods for cod and halibut, but you are better off with longer rods bouncing bottom. There are reasons why cod fishermen prefer 7'-8' jigging rods. As you know, there is no different technique between cod jigging and halibut jigging.
    I found OTI 7'6" rated to 80 lbs is perfect for cod/halibut jigging as well as grouper jigging. I even use it for tuna jigging. I brought OTI 7'6" custom two-piece conventional rod to Kodiak, Alaska last year and it performed beautifully for cod and halibut.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Wow, these Halibut amaze me everytime I see them next to someone. Nice fish Kil! I fish for flounder here in the GOM, but these monsters make big flounder here look like fingerlings, lol!

    btw Kil, I sent u email regarding an order :)
     
  9. SteelingHeads

    SteelingHeads Senior Member

    731
    13
    Thanks for all your replies!

    Over here halibut and cod are caught in shallow waters also. Big fish have been caught in just 100 feet of water. We usually fish from 50-400 feet. My idea was to toss the jigg out, let it sink to the bottom and then use a "spin-sink" retrieve. This should also work well for cod and large pollack, also a nice gamefish in these waters.

    It's always nice to try something out of the ordinary :D

    The OTI rods look great! Sadly, the exchange rate right now is not favourable for me so an import from the US would cost me plenty. I will probably have to buy from the UK.

    We have a somewhat shallow Spring season for Cod here where we get them in 100 to 140 feet. Our shallow water fishery does not yield many large fish though and we get just as many Haddock as we do Cod. Once Summer sets in they are always much deeper. Casting jigs, allowing them to sink to the bottom, then working them back to a vertical position is standard for Cod here as well. Pollock are actually a more readily available fish (especially in the Fall) here in our waters. They can be a lot of fun to catch. I would think that using a "spin - sink" retrieve would work quite well. I know guys that do that in the Spring in the shallower water very successfully.
     
  10. Wachtel

    Wachtel Member

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    After reading MrBill's post I've decided on a popping rod. The jigging rods seems to be a bit to short for comfort. It's often rough seas and cold weather up north. Also, a popping rod is more versatile.

    I've got possible access locally (waiting for answer from the shop) to some of the Shimano Caranx Kaibutsu rods. I'm unsure how stiff these rods are, maybe the Pencil Instrument would be suitable?
     
  11. Wachtel

    Wachtel Member

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    I have now found a deal on a demo (from a fishing show) OTI Tuna Sniper 40/60. Since this puts the rod at the same price as in the US I'll probably buy it.
     
  12. word-doctor

    word-doctor Senior Member

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