6/20/2009 Coastal BFT report

Discussion in 'Jigging and Popping' started by Capt. Dom, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. Capt. Dom

    Capt. Dom Site Sponsor

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    Squeezed in a trip between these systems, and enjoyed a very nice weather day up there, despite fighting some early morning fog.

    Once we arrived up near the spot, it was only a matter of minutes until we witnessed an awesome surface blitz. We had big tuna crashing everywhere, and my guys threw everything they had, but these fish were very finicky, and the eruptions ceased before we could put a hook in anything other than a shearwater. Have to be the dumbest birds ever, and after a successful release, we headed off to find more action.

    We had our fish on the line not long after by 6:30, as George came tight on an absolute demon of a fish.
    [​IMG]

    A real test of man against nature began, and George was up to the task after preparing all winter for this very moment. George had a brief encounter with raw power last fall, and is now a proud member of the hopelessly afflicted.

    After 23 minutes of torture, yet another tackle failure reared its head, trying to deprive us of our trophy, but it was not the day for this particular fish. First we had to contend with two different buoys in the way, using the boat to keep the fish out of the gear, and then racing around another when he turned back into the beach. After that close encounter, the rod George was using snapped, and left him with less than half the rod, and only 1 functioning guide. We carefully took our time working this fish the last 20 feet, and I ended up leadering the fish to gaff after 5 tense minutes of death circles with a 2 foot, EXTREMELY stout rod. If you look closely you can see the top 4 feet of the rod up against the fish in this shot:
    [​IMG]


    Fish hit the deck as officially the longest of the season on spin gear aboard my boat, a real racer at 68.5 inches and maybe 170 pounds. Nice fish George!
    [​IMG]


    We had plenty of excitement for the next 3 hours, tons of fish breaking, slashing, and otherwise making their presence known. Came tight 3 more times, and actuallly had one of the fish pop 100 pound braid like it was dental floss. There were some really large models mixed in yesterday, saw a few 500 plus pound critters rolling at the surface, just glad we didnt get into one of those knock down drag out 3 plus hour brawls.

    Ended the day tooling up on the stripers inside, had stoopid fishing for an hour with 40 inch fish, but no blues. I was hoping for a few for the smoker, but the golden rule held true...when you want em, good luck, when the last fish you want to see is boofish, you catch tons.

    Off with this gale coming till probably Wed. but I guess these fish need a break as much as I do.....
     
  2. pametfisher

    pametfisher Senior Member

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    You just keep knocking it out of the park ... way to go ... save some for the rest of us ... ;)
     

  3. A.whitman

    A.whitman Senior Member

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    why the rod failure? high sticking or just overpowered by a monster?
     
  4. fishingeek

    fishingeek Senior Member

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    Congratulations Dom and George!!!!!!!!! We were right there and saw the hookup and part of the battle but moved on to stay out of the way:)

    Dom as always you are a tuna magnet!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  5. Capt. Dom

    Capt. Dom Site Sponsor

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    why the rod failure? high sticking or just overpowered by a monster?

    No high sticking whatsoever. He had his elbows locked, rod at chest level, text book form. That was a BIG fish, and it tried everything to get free, including busting a very expensive rod.

    These fish are a tackle manufacturers dream, I have had all sorts of failures and lost gear because these fish are a bit different animal than the ones of previous years.....
     
  6. ToneyC

    ToneyC Senior Member

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    What an awesome fishery! Great job capt!
     
  7. kalispimenta

    kalispimenta Junior member

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    Shouldn't a 68.5 be more like 200#?
     
  8. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Shouldn't a 68.5 be more like 200#?
    Some exaggerate the size of fish, not because they lie, but because they seldom see such big fish before. Capt Dom's eyes are pretty accurate as commerical giant fisherman and he doesn't exaggerate.

    Normally 70' blueifn is about 195 lbs as you see the bluefin lengh/weight table.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. rtran

    rtran Senior Member

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    nice job dom.
     
  10. JFLORES

    JFLORES Senior Member

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    This is a very good topic, most charts are very general and dont account for
    the girth of the fish,IMO thats the most important factor.

    A 70'' fish IMO can be 200lb it really depends on the girth.
    Tunas in Cape Cod are very fat, as the tunas in Cape May for the same
    lenth do not have the same girth there for dont weigh as much.

    The fish in the picture is not as fat as other tunas caught recently.
     
  11. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    John, that is true. The weight can be vary depending on girt length.
    but the table give much objective weight than fishermen's estimates. :)
    You rarely see the actual weight exceel the table's even they look fat.
    I had 305 yft by the talbe measured by fork and girt length in Puerto Vallarta years ago, but i weighed only 283 lbs at the dock.
     
  12. Capt. Dom

    Capt. Dom Site Sponsor

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    My 71.5 inch weighed only 208 pounds 2 weeks ago.

    Very few guys have ever put tuna of that size on an actual scale. They would be surprised to find most of their estimates are over by many pounds.

    The fish in this post had a HUGE head, no belly, and a skinny tail section. I think 170 is pretty close estimate, based on the weight of the core afterwards, with head, tail and guts off.

    Commercial weights dont ever take into consideration the girth to calculate the actual weight of the fish. The tables are very accurate in determining within 2-3% of what the real weight is usually. These fish have very little bone weight, and muscle mass is about the same throughout the length of any given class fish. In the spring, they are on the low end of the scale after their journey most times, and in the fall those numbers go up to the high end of the scale, due to the fish packing on their fat to retain while migrating to winter grounds.

    That being said, there are some VERY chubby specimens being landed, but the fat content is very low within the actual meat of the fish.
     
  13. Anuvat

    Anuvat Senior Member

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    Dom, thank you once again for a very memorable trip. George still can't move this morning, LOL.
     
  14. Capt. Dom

    Capt. Dom Site Sponsor

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    Dom, thank you once again for a very memorable trip. George still can't move this morning, LOL.

    Andy, anytime with you guys. It was like fishing with friends, and days like that make my job the greatest on earth. I should thank you guys.

    George was impressive with that fish. He hammered that thing a good 7 times when it hit, and after we got the line out from the engine legs(forgot that tidbit in the report), he settled in for a nice long fight, with some heavy drag. He handled himself amazingly well for his first vertical fight with a very angry, large tuna. Too bad about the rod, but what a great team effort at the leader and when the iron sank home, with a busted rod at the butt section with only 1 functioning guide.

    How about that tuna tracking you all slow back to the boat and then turning its belly to you? Amazingly clear water, and plenty of signs of charlie. Make sure you guys get me those pics.

    Lets do that again real soon.
     
  15. Anuvat

    Anuvat Senior Member

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    Dom, that tuna had it's radars track on the lure but decided it just wasn't his day for a photo op:) when it turned on it's side I thought I was going to have a heart attack, lol.

    It'll be too long before we can get out there again. We'll see each other real soon.
     
  16. Eastern Tackle

    Eastern Tackle Senior Member

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    Excellent job Dom.

    Also thanks for the chart Kil. I had estimated the 70" fish I caught and released in April at 200lb. I guess I fudged by 5 lbs. Then again, I am a fisherman.:)
     
  17. pametfisher

    pametfisher Senior Member

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    If you go to NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service site and navigate to this link NOAA NMFS HMS Permit Library, then go to the bottom of the page, you get the NMFS official "estimate". The rodnreel page RodnReel Bluefin Tuna that Ksong posted says: Note: Data courtesy of National Marine Fisheries Service and Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission.

    So anyone using either estimate above isn't fudging or exaggerating, they are just taking a statistical guess. It would be like going to a fish market, asking for cod, seeing a chart that said the average Cod fillet weighed 1.5 lbs., and paying for your fish based on the chart. On average you'd be right ... but I bet you wouldn't buy on that basis.

    If you want to know how long it is, measure it according to NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service guidelines. And if you want to know what it weighs, well, put it on a scale. ;)
     
  18. ksong

    ksong SPONSOR

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    Excellent job Dom.

    Also thanks for the chart Kil. I had estimated the 70" fish I caught and released in April at 200lb. I guess I fudged by 5 lbs. Then again, I am a fisherman.:)
    You have very good eyes. I've seen some overestimated by 50 lbs. :)