2-Speed or Single Speed Reel?

Discussion in 'Reels' started by Flattop, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. Flattop

    Flattop Junior member

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    I'm in the market for a new reel to sit on my new rod I'm having made. The rod is in the 50# class and I'm torn between a 2-speed or a single speed reel. I do 80 percent of my fishing within 30 miles of the Jersey coast. A 50# rod maybe overkill for inshore but you never know when a big thresher will hit your bait and with the braided lines and small reels a 50# set-up is pretty much a standard striper set-up now.

    So are there any REAL advantages of 2-speed over a single speed reel and is it worth the extra $125.00 or more for the reel?
     
  2. macka17

    macka17 Member

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    Hi.

    Simple answer.

    You can AFFORD one...
    Get one.

    They are better. and just feel good. Knowing you have it..

    I'm 68 You're a long time dead.

    Enjoy now. NOT later. There may NOT be a later...
    Macka17:D ;)
     

  3. macka17

    macka17 Member

    93
    1
    Hi.

    Simple answer.

    You can AFFORD one...
    Get one.

    They are better. and just feel good. Knowing you have it..

    I'm 68 You're a long time dead.

    Enjoy now. NOT later. There may not... be a later.

    Macka17:D ;)
     

  4. macka17

    macka17 Member

    93
    1
    PS.

    The reason for the last paragraph in that post.

    One of my 11 granddaughters just rang me to tell me that her Ex. 25yrs old.
    Was just murdered by a 23 yr old after a bar fight.
    Head injuries. Beaten to death..

    Poor kid. I've known him all his life.
    Was just starting out in life.

    Like I said.

    you never know. make the most of what you got..

    Macka17
     
  5. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    Me personally I would save the $130 for line or lures. I have 6 2 speed reels and have only put them in low gear just for testing.

    d-a
     
  6. north coast

    north coast Senior Member

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    I don't have any 2 speeds, but I have at least 25 reels. and I catch my share of fish.(maybe better) I honestly don't believe you need them.Could a situation come up where you can't budge a bruiser off the bottom and need a low speed? I guess that depends where,for what, and how you fish.In 40 years of catching I can't remember once saying "Jeez I wish I had a lower speed" I agree with, take the xtra cash and get some cool toys to go with the single speed reel.
     
  7. Bill Fisher

    Bill Fisher Senior Member

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    i could probably write a book on 2-speed <vs> single speed but the bottom line is, what's right for you?.........

    if the reel has harness lugs and you can attach to'em and know how to pump the fish properly keeping consistent pressure on'im without ever varying that pressure...... a single speed is fine and that's what i prefer

    having a 2nd (lower) gear might be a good idea for a reel that won't accept a harness and all the work is gonna be done with your arms........ that lower gear can be advantageous for those not accustomed to fighting bigger fish properly (ie: jerking and cranking like mad or laying the rod on the rail or side o'boat and steady cranking)

    i have several 2-speeds but only because the mfg'r didn't offer a single speed model........ i've tried the lower gear but never used it

    my thots are it's something extra that can go wrong with a reel and most mfg'rs wind up having the crank handle offset further from the reel making it wobbly to reel in something big under pressure....... and because it's offset further like it is, they've moved the center o'gravity even futher away from the rod

    very few mfg'rs (if any) even bother to place the foot of their reels on the center of gravity so they'll be balanced on top of the rod

    now if i had a 1000# dead marlin straight down about 800' below the boat, i'm sure i'd be wishing i had a lower gear to winch'im up ;)
     
  8. stresst

    stresst Senior Member

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    Go with a 2 speed!!
     
  9. Dave Nowlin

    Dave Nowlin Senior Member

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    I wonder if all the people who don't like 2 speed reels also have vehicles that only have high gears in them. You could still drive them but it would be harder on the engine and drivetrain. When using a reel you are the engine. If you plan on catching multiple fish in a day and don't want to end up exhausted, the low gear is your friend. If all you're after is bragging rights, then go with the single speed. You can tell everybody how tough you are. As you get older, hopefully you'll get smarter, and use technology to your advantage.

    Dave Nowlin
     
  10. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    the above has nothing to do with it. a 6:1 ratio tends to have poor cranking power due to the gearing for a high ratio and thus you end up cranking very hard on high gear (or breaking it which I've done a few times) or needing to screw with the reel to get it to "low" gear. 4:1 to 5:1 is a fine ratio for all jigged tuna up to 150lbs. D the 4:1 gives you plenty of cranking power and speed. You don't need to rip the jig at mach 1 to get a strike.

    the alutecnos gorilla 12 has a 4.4:1 ratio and is perfectly fine for tuna/grouper, etc. theres no argument for having a 2:1 ratio and a 4:1 ratio on one reel...thatd be great. But the problem is most small 2 speeds have 6:1 and about a 3:1. the 3:1 really isnt much stronger than the 4:1 and is more multi purpose. the guys at jigging master didnt make their reel a single speed with a 4-5:1 ratio just because they were lazy, it was after years of experience.

    dont get me wrong there is a nice thing about a 2 speed but as people said above id rather get a good single speed and 5 more lures than spend a bit more for the 2 speeds.
     
  11. d-a

    d-a Senior Member

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    206
    I wonder if all the people who don't like 2 speed reels also have vehicles that only have high gears in them. You could still drive them but it would be harder on the engine and drivetrain. When using a reel you are the engine. If you plan on catching multiple fish in a day and don't want to end up exhausted, the low gear is your friend. If all you're after is bragging rights, then go with the single speed. You can tell everybody how tough you are. As you get older, hopefully you'll get smarter, and use technology to your advantage.

    Dave Nowlin

    Actually my 2 speed reels are just like my vehicles, they spend most of there time in high gear.

    d-a
     
  12. Dave Nowlin

    Dave Nowlin Senior Member

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    Actually my Avet Hoo-X has a 5.4:1 high gear and a 2.4:1 low gear. I jig with it on high and once I have moved a fish far enough to feel it is clear of hangups, I clip into my Smitty's Spider Harness and put the reel in low gear. My left hand now guides the line onto the reel and my right hand turns the handle. There is no huge bend in my back and no straining. I set my drag at 20# on a digital scale at a straight pull and use 80# JB spectra with 80# topshot. Fishing should be fun and not a struggle. At least that's my take on it at 67 years old. I've been fishing since I was a little tyke, though mostly in fresh water. We don't have a salt water port in Tennessee. Even if you believe all that Al Gore has to say about global warming, I don't believe we will have salt water beach front property in Tennessee.

    Dave Nowlin
     
  13. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    If you can afford 2 speeds get a quality metal reel. I've used low gear more than once and on hard fighters it saves the fisherman.
     
  14. BretABaker

    BretABaker Guest

    i hadnt seen avet improved the hx's ratio. i knew accurate improved the bx2 series to 5:1 high gear.
     
  15. John_Madison CT

    John_Madison CT Senior Member

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    FWIW, I landed a 70" BFT on a 6.3:1 conventional reel, the Penn Torque 300.

    What I found was that you need to pump the fish with that kind of reel, but when you do, it retrieves 48" of line per crank. I whooped the fish very fast with this technique.
     
  16. Flattop

    Flattop Junior member

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    Guys thanks for the responses. I can see both points of view being put forth. It's pretty much the same arguements I've had with myself and decided to post the question for a larger opinon base.

    I'm 50 years old and enjoy a good workout whether in the gym or on the boat against a big fish. However, I'm all for technology. I've owned a 4 wheel drive SUV for 20 years. I don't always use the 4 wheel drive but it's nice when I do need it. My philosophy is "Better to have and not need than to need and not have." That covers beer, ammo and fishing gear. I still have some time to mull this decision over.

    Thanks again and keep the comments coming it does help the decision process.
     
  17. Bill Fisher

    Bill Fisher Senior Member

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    2-speeds should only be available in pink

    :p
     
  18. Dave Nowlin

    Dave Nowlin Senior Member

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    Is pink your favorite color? Would you begin using them if they were pink?

    Dave Nowlin
     
  19. Snagged

    Snagged Senior Member

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    Is pink your favorite color? Would you begin using them if they were pink?

    Dave Nowlin
    :D :D :D :D :D :D
     
  20. lite-liner

    lite-liner troll enforcement Staff Member

    5,941
    1,797
    FWIW, I landed a 70" BFT on a 6.3:1 conventional reel, the Penn Torque 300.

    What I found was that you need to pump the fish with that kind of reel, but when you do, it retrieves 48" of line per crank. I whooped the fish very fast with this technique.

    Exactly. I'm not the type to "rail & winch", and that is the only downside
    to a high ratio- reel. use the rod.
    But, the question here is- are 2-speed reels a necessity for pelagic gamefish under 200#?

    In most instances I would say no. I have 3, and have only used low 1 time
    on a large shark, straight up & down, for about 1 minute.

    As mentioned before, all this advice (mine included) is what works for that particular angler's situation, or is a generality at best.
    find what works for YOU. this'll take time & money, but fortunately most
    of these reels hold their resale value pretty well:D
     
  21. TBaker

    TBaker Senior Member

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    1
    a 6:1 ratio tends to have poor cranking power due to the gearing for a high ratio and thus you end up cranking very hard on high gear (or breaking it which I've done a few times) or needing to screw with the reel to get it to "low" gear. 4:1 to 5:1 is a fine ratio for all jigged tuna up to 150lbs. D the 4:1 gives you plenty of cranking power and speed. You don't need to rip the jig at mach 1 to get a strike.

    the alutecnos gorilla 12 has a 4.4:1 ratio and is perfectly fine for tuna/grouper, etc. theres no argument for having a 2:1 ratio and a 4:1 ratio on one reel...thatd be great. But the problem is most small 2 speeds have 6:1 and about a 3:1. the 3:1 really isnt much stronger than the 4:1 and is more multi purpose. the guys at jigging master didnt make their reel a single speed with a 4-5:1 ratio just because they were lazy, it was after years of experience.

    dont get me wrong there is a nice thing about a 2 speed but as people said above id rather get a good single speed and 5 more lures than spend a bit more for the 2 speeds.

    Bret's got it right. (Hey, he's my son so what would you expect me to say?! :) ) It's all about the cranking power and the situations you fish. Most of the good single-speeds with a 4 to 5:1 ratios will do you fine in most situations with fish up to 150 lbs. and/or shallower waters. BUT, when you get big fish that will hold straight down in deep water (think bigeye tuna or swordfish in the NE canyons) then that 1.5-2:1 low gear will come in real handy.

    It strikes me that the situation you want to address, (possible big thresher while fishing for stripers), may be a bit like Bill Fisher's. I believe he does a lot of trolling for billfish in the GOM. In that case, he can move the boat to help fight the fish which generally stays closer to the surface. For that, he doesn't need 2-speeds. For you, its much the same. Big thresher grabs a bunker or jig in shallow water, he's gonna run away not down. You'll probably need to move your boat to keep up, much like Bill Fisher would with a big marlin. 2-speed reel really won't help you much there. Real good single-speed (4-5:1 ratio) would be the way to go, IMO.